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View Full Version : New Results from Stardust Mission Paint Chaotic Picture of Early Solar System



Fraser
2010-Feb-26, 07:50 PM
One of the most surprising results from the Stardust mission which returned comet dust samples to Earth in 2006 is that comets don't just consist of particles from the icy parts of the outer solar system, which was the common assumption, but also includes sooty dust from the hot, inner part of the [...]

More... (http://www.universetoday.com/2010/02/26/new-results-from-stardust-mission-paint-chaotic-picture-of-early-solar-system/)

Jerry
2010-Feb-28, 12:10 AM
...is that comets don't just consist of particles from the icy parts of the outer solar system, which was the common assumption, but also includes sooty dust from the hot, inner region close to the Sun.

That is one possibility. Another is that comets originated somewhere else, and still another is that the outer solar system is littered with sooty dust and many other heavier elements. The primary, accepted theory for how the solar system formed eschews the make-up we are seeing in comets - not just Wild 2, but every one we have examined closely. Something fundamental could be wrong.

The Dark face of Iapetus says more: There may be 'sooty stuff' acting like black snowballs. Or has the dark, leading hemisphere of Iapetus sublimed away a thin icey coating, leaving a dark, Titan like enigma? And the changing face of Pluto, what's with that? There is much to be learned!

trinitree88
2010-Feb-28, 05:41 PM
One of the most surprising results from the Stardust mission which returned comet dust samples to Earth in 2006 is that comets don't just consist of particles from the icy parts of the outer solar system, which was the common assumption, but also includes sooty dust from the hot, inner part of the [...]

More... (http://www.universetoday.com/2010/02/26/new-results-from-stardust-mission-paint-chaotic-picture-of-early-solar-system/)

Fraser. I hope the analysis includes the recent visit, within the last several million years, of intruding O/B stars from the Centaurus-Sco association that are believed to have contributed six separate supernova blasts, clearing out the region known as the Local Bubble. Marine sediments from Earth indicate that fe-60 has been deposited here (and more likely on Mars) as a result of those visitations. Late phase evolution of type-2 supernovae should also involve reprocessing of dust grains (Dwek, NASA Goddard) and surface depositions of carbon nanotubes (Kielty, Duke). It will be tricky to discriminate between inner solar carbon soot and supernovae soot accumulated by comets on their visitations.
In deep space, said sooty grains should be radiating pretty blackbody at ~ 2.7 K. see blackest black: