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SolusLupus
2010-Feb-28, 03:39 PM
Okay, I'm not expecting miracle workers to come here and solve all my problems, but I do want some advice here.

My problem is, whenever I have a time I want to wake up (like at 7:30 in the morning or whatever), I always get antsy and anxious, causing my body to wake up at least an hour early. I often wake up in fits and starts, waking up at 2:00, finding out I still have time to sleep, sleeping until 3:00, finding out I have time to sleep, etc.

While it's a relief to wake up too early and find out I have time to sleep, I think it's causing me to feel more tired than when I just collapse asleep and sleep for 8-10 hours at a time on weekend nights.

However, there's an issue with that, too; I think my body's keen on waking up "early", and it's selected 7-8:00 for a good time to wake up when I don't have an alarm. This is true even when I sleep 1-2:00 in the morning.

Can someone help me out here?

htriggerx
2010-Feb-28, 04:01 PM
Prince Valium

Ara Pacis
2010-Feb-28, 06:59 PM
Sleeping pills, or pill. Tylenol PM or equivalent (Paracetamol with diphenhydramine) or diphenhydramine straight often works for me, but I only take one pill since two gives me cottonmouth and too much sleep. If the problem is going to sleep too late, you could try not eating anything after 4 hours before bedtime, or eat something sugary a little before bedtime so that the sugar crash helps you sleep.

Swift
2010-Mar-01, 03:32 AM
One thing that might help, though it can be difficult (I would think particularly with a student schedule) is to try to follow a very consistent schedule. Try to go to sleep at the same time every night and wake up at the same time each morning, even if you can sleep later. That helps to program the body to specific times, and maybe you'll stay asleep till that time.

Fazor
2010-Mar-01, 03:42 AM
I don't know--Dang. Tara interrupted me and now I don't know what I don't know.

Oh, as I was trying to say [gives Tara the evil eye] I don't know when it happened, but my body set it's own alarm clock. Much the same problem as you have. I wake up at 6:00 most every day. I can go back to sleep if I want, but like you, I suspect it's making me more tired when I actually get up. Holds true for weekends, even when I stay up 'til 2 or 3am. That really screws me up.

The only thing that helps is, instead of trying to sleep later, going to bed earlier. I often just rely on being mentally dulled (even from my usually dull state) and coffee, and getting too little sleep. Going to bed earlier is just giving up too much time.

Plus, up until about 6 months ago, I had about 2 years of maddening insomnia. My god, that was aweful. At least now I can fall asleep at nights.

I guess that wasn't much help though. Good luck!

GalaxyGal
2010-Mar-01, 04:19 AM
To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub

Boy can I sympathize. Fortunately, have been sleeping soundly of late. Here's some tips on sleep hygiene (no, it doesn't mean clean sheets....although that can't hurt).

* Get up and go to bed the same time every day

Even on weekends! When your sleep cycle has a regular rhythm, you will feel better.

* Refrain from exercise at least 4 hours before bedtime

Regular exercise is recommended to help you sleep well, but the timing of the workout is important. Exercising in the morning or early afternoon will not interfere with sleep.

* Develop sleep rituals

It is important to give your body cues that it is time to slow down and sleep. Listen to relaxing music, read something soothing for 15 minutes, have a cup of caffeine free tea, do relaxation exercises.

* Only use your bed for sleeping

Refrain from using your bed to watch TV, pay bills, do work or reading. So when you go to bed your body knows it is time to sleep. Sex is the only exception.

* If you can't fall asleep within 20 minutes, get up and do something boring until you feel sleepy

Sit quietly in the dark. Don't watch TV as it is too stimulating. Don't expose yourself to bright light while you are up. The light gives cues to your brain that it is time to wake up.

* Stay away from caffeine, nicotine and alcohol at least 4-6 hours before bed

Caffeine and nicotine are stimulants that interfere with your ability to fall asleep. Coffee, tea, cola, cocoa, chocolate and some prescription and non-prescription drugs contain caffeine. Cigarettes and some drugs contain nicotine. Alcohol may seem to help you sleep in the beginning as it slows brain activity, but you will end end up having fragmented sleep.

* Take a hot bath 90 minutes before bedtime

A hot bath will raise your body temperature, but it is the drop in body temperature that may leave you feeling sleepy. I prefer showers myself...it works like a charm for me when I've had trouble falling asleep.

* Chill out

A hot room can be uncomfortable. A cooler room along with enough blankets to stay warm is recommended.

Good night, and good rest!

Jens
2010-Mar-01, 04:55 AM
Can someone help me out here?

I have the same problem. I've never really had to use an alarm clock, because I'll wake up on time anyway. Or rather, I'll wake up at 5:00 if I have to be up at 7:00, then try to sleep more but not get back to sleep, etc. I tried valium at one point, but wouldn't really recommend it. The thing that helps most in my case is not to obsess about not sleeping. At some point I came to a realization that I get more or less as much sleep as I need, and trying to sleep better becomes counter-productive because it just creates stress.

Sticks
2010-Mar-01, 05:46 AM
Horlicks

mugaliens
2010-Mar-01, 09:04 AM
Okay, I'm not expecting miracle workers to come here and solve all my problems, but I do want some advice here.

My problem is, whenever I have a time I want to wake up (like at 7:30 in the morning or whatever), I always get antsy and anxious, causing my body to wake up at least an hour early. I often wake up in fits and starts, waking up at 2:00, finding out I still have time to sleep, sleeping until 3:00, finding out I have time to sleep, etc.

While it's a relief to wake up too early and find out I have time to sleep, I think it's causing me to feel more tired than when I just collapse asleep and sleep for 8-10 hours at a time on weekend nights.

However, there's an issue with that, too; I think my body's keen on waking up "early", and it's selected 7-8:00 for a good time to wake up when I don't have an alarm. This is true even when I sleep 1-2:00 in the morning.

Can someone help me out here?

Yeah. I may not want to, but having suffered severe insomnia from 2005 through 2008, I will. :) I feel for you, and never want anyone to go through what I went through at the hands of incompetant doctors.

Each and every one of my suggestions come directly from the annals of hard science, particularly sleep science, as well-documented by the most successful and acredited sleep researchers around the globe. There are many more such scientific recommendations, most of which have found their way into mainstream, yet properly referenced publication. However, I only share the ones with which I have personal experience.

Besides, I update this regularly, and it's helped others. Hope it helps you, as well.

1. Get two alarm clocks and set them for the same time. It helps with the trust issue if you're worried about either one of them failing or not getting up.

2. Melatonin. Most are 3 mg, but toss them, as that high of a dose produces vivid dreams in most people. In fact, most people begin to feel the effects at just 300 mcg, 1/10 the 3 mg dose. I know Rexall carries the lower dose, and some others might, but don't know who. Take one 30 min before lights out and be in bed ready to go to sleep less within 10 min.

3. Hydrate. Some sleep problems are caused by dehydration. You obviously don't want to chug a quart of H20 just before bedtime. But you should be drinking water throughout the evening, thoroughly enough to trigger the primary response that you're well hydrated once or twice between dinner and turn-in.

4. Lights out - If you're an adult, shoot for 8 hrs. If wakey is 6 am, shoot for lights out at 10 pm. Easy math.

5. Dim the lights half an hour prior to lights out. Bright lights, TV, action-adventure - all tell your brain, "stay awake!" Time to cut off those messages.

6. Avoid exercise within five hours of lights out time.

7. Avoid any big meals within eight hours of lights out. Dinner's fine - just kept it light, as well as a light snack not later than two hours prior.

Here's how my schedule would look if I were a 10pm to 6am sleeper:

5pm - no more exercise (note this implies you do get some form of daily exercise - 3x/wk 20-min cardio, 2x/wk strength - not excessive, just something).
6pm -begin drinking water. Set alarm clocks for 6am.
9pm - stop drinking water.
9:30pm - dim lights. No TV. Take 300 mcg Melatonin. Read a book.
10:00pm - lights out.
10:30 - still not asleep? Take another 300 mcg Melatonin.
6am: Rise and shine.

Good luck!

ETA: I second GalaxyGal's recommendations (http://www.bautforum.com/off-topic-babbling/101379-i-need-tips-sleeping-when-i-want-waking-up-when-i-want.html#post1690854)- they're among the others I've read many times over during those excruciating 34 months.

ETA 2: I strongly discourage the use of the usual "sleep aids" as most have rebound (can't sleep for days upon stopping) effects, particularly ambien, but also valium, most narcotics, and alcohol. There are very few other meds out there which work well, but there are some. I'm not a doctor, so I won't recommend - see your sleep specialist if the above regimen doesn't work.

closetgeek
2010-Mar-01, 01:23 PM
Seriously, Melatonin works; not only do I stay asleep but there is no druggy feeling in the morning. For years I suspected it was the placebo effect but I started taking it last week and have slept soundly, deeply, and woke up feeling like actually slept. That's a quick short term fix but Galaxy Gal and Mugaliens are dead on about routine. The only downside is the Fazor reaction, I have the same problem. If you have sleep disturbances through the night, I don't recommend Ambien/Lunesta as they seem to exacarbate the problem.