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Tog
2010-Mar-02, 02:05 PM
Here is a video (http://www.wimp.com/awarenesstest/) that is actually a public service ad.

It asks a question at the start, which I got right. Then it asks another at the end, which I did not get right.

No spoilers please. At least for a while. The reason I posted it here should be pretty obvious to those that spend time in the CT section.

Strange
2010-Mar-02, 02:13 PM
I'm surprised because I have read about this but still had to say "no" to the second question ...

jokergirl
2010-Mar-02, 02:47 PM
I read about it a while ago, watched the video then, and I didn't either.

;)

Fazor
2010-Mar-02, 02:50 PM
Yeah, very neat clip. I was looking for anything unrelated to the first question (while still trying to answer the first question) but admit I did not notice it either.

Cougar
2010-Mar-02, 03:10 PM
It's a bit like the Heisenberg principle. The more you can answer "yes" to question number 2, the more you are likely to undercount question number 1.

Fazor
2010-Mar-02, 03:14 PM
I think it's a very clever and apt way to make their particular point too. It annoys me that most people, when approaching a stopsign, don't look to make sure they have right-away, rather, glance to make sure they don't have a particular need to actually stop.

Around here, you can't even use the term "rolling stop", it's more like a "slight decrease in acceleration, followed by a huge increase in acceleration to shoot out in front of the car that's coming."

I really, really hate the way people drive.

MAPNUT
2010-Mar-02, 04:03 PM
If it had really been a - - - - , I might have been able to answer the second question. But it didn't look much like a - and wasn't - - - very well. ;)

HenrikOlsen
2010-Mar-02, 05:44 PM
I got both right, but then I know what to look for in that kind of tests.

mugaliens
2010-Mar-02, 07:16 PM
Correct/Yes.


It annoys me that most people, when approaching a stopsign, don't look to make sure they have right-away, rather, glance to make sure they don't have a particular need to actually stop.

Here they almost always stop, but then don't know when they have the right of way! They either just sit there, on my right, waiting for me to drive through, or worse, waiving me through in violation of the law.

They almost always go when I put my hands atop the steering wheel and begin twiddling my thumbs.

Strange
2010-Mar-02, 08:00 PM
Correct/Yes.

Apparently, about 50% of people answer no to the the second question. I don't know if there is a gender difference. When I tried it again, I got the first question wrong (by 1) but the second one right.

redshifter
2010-Mar-02, 08:45 PM
Correct/Yes.



Here they almost always stop, but then don't know when they have the right of way! They either just sit there, on my right, waiting for me to drive through, or worse, waiving me through in violation of the law.

They almost always go when I put my hands atop the steering wheel and begin twiddling my thumbs.

Stop signs (esp. 4 way stops) seem to be a binary operation in this area: either everyone stops and tries to outwait each other, or someone thinks a 4 way stop means close your eyes and floor the gas pedal.

One Skunk Todd
2010-Mar-02, 08:50 PM
I got both right. I was a little surprised about getting the number of passes correct but I was looking for the insertion of something unusual because I've seen, and been fooled, by misdirection videos like these before. I think the team had a rhythm going for the passes and I (barely) managed to keep the count based on that. If they had not kept a beat I'm sure I would have lost count.

mugaliens
2010-Mar-03, 04:42 AM
Stop signs (esp. 4 way stops) seem to be a binary operation in this area: either everyone stops and tries to outwait each other, or someone thinks a 4 way stop means close your eyes and floor the gas pedal.

Yes. And I don't get it - when I began learning to drive in the '70s, people knew rights of way. Now they dont? Aren't they teaching that anymore? Has there been negative learning somewhere along the way where over-politeness has replaced safety?

01101001
2010-Mar-03, 05:57 AM
Here is a video (http://www.wimp.com/awarenesstest/) that is actually a public service ad.

Credit to the originator, a scientist type:
University of Illinois: Visual Congition Lab (http://viscog.beckman.illinois.edu/djs_lab/demos.html)

Sustained inattentional blindness -- selective looking
These videos were used as stimuli in Simons & Chabris (1999). [...] in our midst: sustained inattentional blindness for dynamic events.
Cruder original (http://viscog.beckman.illinois.edu/flashmovie/15.php)

Nudge blog: Watch out for cyclists (http://nudges.wordpress.com/watch-out-for-cyclists/)


Unfortunately, the ad has become part of story about intellectual property, as well as human error.

Jens
2010-Mar-03, 09:44 AM
List many others, I didn't see it. But I went into it with no idea that there was going to be a trick question. I think that expectations probably make a difference.

I think it's probably quite normal to get the second question wrong. I suspect that it's the way our concentration is supposed to work. When you look at a cat or an owl, they keep their gaze fixed on their prey and can be really oblivious to other things happening around them. Whereas an animal like a horse or deer will keep concentrating on different things to look out for potential danger.

tdvance
2010-Mar-04, 03:00 AM
Stop signs (esp. 4 way stops) seem to be a binary operation in this area: either everyone stops and tries to outwait each other, or someone thinks a 4 way stop means close your eyes and floor the gas pedal.

In Bowie, you have people who race to keep up with the guy who just went through before anyone from another direction can go, and you have people who sit and wait as their turn passes, again and again.... And when a 4-way was turned into a stoplight, for as much as a year afterward, people would stop, take a quick look, then go on through on red.

mugaliens
2010-Mar-04, 11:15 AM
I think that expectations probably make a difference.

Absolutely. The first time I saw this was in a room full of military aviators. Of the roughly 20 of us, none of us spotted the gorilla, and the video we saw was shot in a much lighter room, so the guy in the gorilla suit really stood out! But we'd been given a task, and you know how competitive aviators can be, so every one of us was counting passes as if our lives depended on it.

The exercise was one in "channelization," which occurs when someone over-focuses on one thing to the exclusion of others. It was the principle factor in the Air Florida disaster - the pilots had focused on a peanut bulb that had burned out, to the exclusion of their altitude.

To compensate, we're taught "relaxed detachment," taking a mental step back and taking an overall view of things.

ETA:


Cruder original (http://viscog.beckman.illinois.edu/flashmovie/15.php)

Yep - that's the one we flubbed!