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View Full Version : The mystery of the Windermere Triangle has now been solved



Sticks
2010-Mar-03, 08:47 AM
Reported on the BBC Website (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/cumbria/8545104.stm)


A mystery which has been baffling motorists in a Lake District town for months has been solved.

Electronic car key fobs have failed to work around Crescent Road in Windermere, resulting in the area being dubbed the "Windermere Triangle".

Motorists have been unable to get in or out of their cars and security vans have been left stranded.

The culprit has now been revealed as the hand-held wireless devices used to take orders at a nearby bistro.

The system at Lazy Daisy's Lakeland Kitchen used the same radio frequency as many of the car key fobs.


Now I seem to recall that there is a place in New York which is like that, could that be the reason rather than the Empire State Building? :whistle:

Ivan Viehoff
2010-Mar-03, 10:49 AM
You mean that car companies designed cars that wouldn't work if the battery went flat in the key fob, or with e.m. interference? I thought that was what the key-shaped bit was for.

novaderrik
2010-Mar-03, 02:22 PM
there are new cars that you cannot even get into if the battery goes dead- ask any 97 and newer Corvette owner about that.
that just seems like a stupid design to me- things like door locks and latches should be mechanical first, with electronic "backup" for things like keyless entry and what not.
it's almost as stupid as the keyless ignition setups that require you to stay calm and hold the "start/stop" button down for 3-5 seconds as your car is hurtling out of control and the shifter won't allow you to throw it in neutral, as is the case with a certain make of cars with a name that starts with the words "Toy"..

rommel543
2010-Mar-03, 02:50 PM
Back when I worked in retail, I had a woman come into the store in tears. She had gotten out to her car and couldn't get in because the remote entry wouldn't work. As I was replacing the battery in it for her I asked her why the key wouldn't work. She got this blank look on her face and didn't say anything again until she paid for the new battery. She more than likely didn't even try to use her key and left all her groceries beside her car.

korjik
2010-Mar-03, 05:15 PM
there are new cars that you cannot even get into if the battery goes dead- ask any 97 and newer Corvette owner about that.
that just seems like a stupid design to me- things like door locks and latches should be mechanical first, with electronic "backup" for things like keyless entry and what not.
it's almost as stupid as the keyless ignition setups that require you to stay calm and hold the "start/stop" button down for 3-5 seconds as your car is hurtling out of control and the shifter won't allow you to throw it in neutral, as is the case with a certain make of cars with a name that starts with the words "Toy"..

I have always been a bit suspect of computer control systems. I want the car to go as well as I can drive, not as well as the guy who programmed the computer can program.

HenrikOlsen
2010-Mar-03, 05:55 PM
Even if he's better at programming that you are at driving?

korjik
2010-Mar-04, 08:23 PM
Even if he's better at programming that you are at driving?

Actually, yeah. If he screws up, I die. If I screw up, I die. I would prefer option two.

That situation is a bit exaggerated, but it gives my opinion. I would rather my crash be my fault, not the cars.

rommel543
2010-Mar-04, 09:51 PM
Well if it's a Microsoft programmer when you turn left and have your right turn signal on the car will shut down and you'll have to have your engine re-installed.

slang
2010-Mar-04, 11:38 PM
Well if it's a Microsoft programmer when you turn left and have your right turn signal on the car will shut down and you'll have to have your engine re-installed.

Just make sure you don't carry any rodents, or unexpected things might happen (http://www.cromwell-intl.com/unix/pictures/mouse_movement_error.jpg)..

jokergirl
2010-Mar-05, 08:58 AM
I have always been a bit suspect of computer control systems. I want the car to go as well as I can drive, not as well as the guy who programmed the computer can program.

Then you need to buy a pretty old car for that.

All new cars go as well as the ECS lets them. I have worked quite extensively in that area :)
It is kind of rewarding when you start up a new car with a blank ECU and it sounds like a tractor; one flash of the system later it starts sounding like a modern car. I get a warm fuzzy feeling from it.

;)

mugaliens
2010-Mar-08, 11:57 AM
Even if he's better at programming that you are at driving?

Yes. I think they've worked most of the issues out of ABS, but I recall an earlier system I had on a new 1991 vehicle was horrible on wet ice - I did a much better job if I simply never pressed hard enough to the point where the ABS kicked in. My 2005 vehicle doesn't have an issue.

As for the other issues, I don't think he's better at programming than I am at driving.

At least not yet..