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The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Mar-04, 05:42 AM
We have several threads for the prep of food, so I thought it would a good idea to have a thread on the growing of food.

Right now I am getting my usual itch to work in the garden. I usually try to grow the usual peas, potatoes, beets and others. We also have several apple trees, a grapevine, several rose bushes and a cherry tree.

BigDon
2010-Mar-04, 06:18 AM
Still waiting on a particularly cold set of rain storms to pass. But spring is here big time.

I have roses, petunias, last fall I bought three fushias, all gartenmeister bonstedts which do well around here. Three kinds of jasmine, with a clear preference for pink jasmine. On warm still days you can smell it forty feet away.

This season I'm going to expand on the amount of orange in the flowers of the yard and go will these nice poppy orange pansies which are a lot less problematic than actual california poppies. California poppies never seem to grow were you want them and always grow where you don't.

I put the pansies in bower bowls, and place them between the larger plants. As I like lobelia (var. Crystal Palace) a lot it makes a nice contrast.

I might transplant a 4 bush bed of roses this spring. They have been struggling with a smidgeon too much shade since I put them in in the late '80's. The new spot has a nice southern exposure that other roses thrive in.

I'll replace them with tall fushcias I'm thinking. In the backyard I might try hollyhocks this year. In my youth the old guys would grow champeon sized stalks. The tallest growing between two houses both painted white to reflect light with north/south exposures that protected the long stalks from the prevailing westerlie winds.

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Mar-04, 06:27 AM
Ground still frozen and some snow on the ground but the more prep work I get done now will probably help.

The growing season around has turned a little weird lately. In April and the first of May it is warm and dry and late May it turns wet for a couple of weeks. And late July and August it turns wet and cool. I am thinking of starting most of the vegetables early and using cold frames to overcome some the problems with the weather.

HenrikOlsen
2010-Mar-04, 07:31 AM
I've ordered some more apple rootstock and scions for more attempts at grafting and has just sown a lot of tomatoes in the hope that I can get them out into the green house in the beginning of April.

Ground still frozen and partially covered with snow, so I'm hopeful the cabbages (white and red head cabbage) I started last autumn has survived the winder and will soon start growing.

The potatoes from last year are sprouting nicely, but it'll likely be at least a month more before it's safe to plant them, as they can't take frost after the spouts get above ground.

jokergirl
2010-Mar-04, 07:49 AM
It's still snowy outside, but we've cleared up our plantations from last year and are planning to plant some tomatoes and some herbs once the windowsill is cleaned.

;)

sarongsong
2010-Mar-04, 08:16 AM
The Old Farmers Almanac weighs in:
Planting Dates for Seeds

Here's when to plant your seeds (http://www.almanac.com/gardening/planting-dates) indoors, in the ground, and by the Moon. No hand calculations! Just type in any location...
almanac.com (http://www.almanac.com/gardening)

Ivan Viehoff
2010-Mar-04, 10:45 AM
Potatoes chitting. 2 out of 3 chilli varieties, and sweet pepper, germinated in the last few days. Probably have to take them out of the propagator before they go rotten, though since I've discovered the use of anti-damping-off chemicals, I get a much better success rate.

Last year I tried achocha. It's rampant and its fun. Not only do the fruits look like hedgehogs, the seeds look like hedgehogs too. And taste OK too. Like tomatoes and squash, you can't put them in the ground outside until all risk of frost has passed. And then they can die through lack of water or slugs until well established. But once they are going, they go. Got all the way to the top of the apple tree. I've kept a few seeds, perhaps I'll try again.

BigDon
2010-Mar-04, 01:58 PM
Probably have to take them out of the propagator before they go rotten, though since I've discovered the use of anti-damping-off chemicals, I get a much better success rate..

Would you care to expand on the subject of anti-damping off chemicals? I'm having issues with some terrariums I started.

jokergirl
2010-Mar-09, 08:56 AM
This weekend we did some spring cleaning, then started our new windowsill plantations.

We have a pot of basil, oregano, cilantro and parsley each, some chives too.
Some bigger pots will house different leafy greens (rocket, red lettuce, field salad, hopefully some mangold and mini cauliflowers - really curious about that last one).
And we've started a planter with different chiles, small-growing cherry tomatoes, white peppers and mini eggplants. This year we're trying to avoid having a jungle on our window and are planting specifically pottable varieties. Heh. We'll see how that goes :)

;)

teddyv
2010-Mar-09, 10:29 PM
Trimmed the apple tree awhile back and bushwhacked the roses. Plum trees are close to blooming. Mowed the lawn twice already - looks like last year's fertilizer is still working.

Crocuses and hyacinths are blooming. Daffodils are well on their way with a couple blooms and the other perennials (hostas, peonies) are starting to show growth.

As far as veggies, I'll usually buy the seedlings, so it will be a little bit before they can go in. We are having a current run of cool weather after the spring-like weather during the Olympics.

mugaliens
2010-Mar-10, 09:38 AM
Oh! Plant the begonias...

chrissy
2010-Mar-10, 08:16 PM
My yellow Jasmine is starting to bud already as the days have been quite warm and dry for the past week, the snow drops have been out for a while now and my hyacinths are sprouting out of the ground too, I am just hoping they don't get frost bite on the new shoots. :( The Bluebells are popping their heads up too.

rommel543
2010-Mar-10, 09:33 PM
Still got snow here. Last year we moved into our new house. Our previous address the back yard was bathed in sun almost all day long, allowing for some great gardening. This new house,2 story which faces west, has a very large maple in the back yard blocking the majority of the sun in the morning. The house then blocks the light the remainder of the day. We only have one plot that gets full sun the majority of the day and the previous owners had it full of limestone and landscaping tarp. It will take us a couple of years to get the loam mixture up in it to have a nice growing location.

HenrikOlsen
2010-Mar-10, 09:54 PM
The tomatoes have just started sprouting, with the first two pulling their leaves out of the ground today and many of the rest showing bent stalks pushing up.
Got about 10 different varieties sown this year, which is quite a lot fewer than last year where my girlfriend went into total Toad mode with sowing and growing tomatoes.

chrissy
2010-Mar-10, 09:55 PM
My garden is west facing, in the summer it is a sun trap and can get very hot at times, my plants love it even though I have a high fence around it, giving shade to the plants who like it and protection from the winds too.

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Mar-10, 10:07 PM
My garden is in a one two fields on the north and south side of the house. Mostly on the south side, right now just waiting for the ground to thaw so I kind start the tiller.

jokergirl
2010-Mar-11, 08:24 AM
My windowsill boxes are sprouting already. Things are in a hurry this year.

Photos when there's something to show.

;)

Sententia
2010-Mar-11, 12:43 PM
Last year I started a garden, my very first time. When I was younger my family had them, so I sortof knew what I was doing. Though it rained alot last year, and we've got round after round of hail storms in June and July.. most of my tomatoes where destroyed by blight and the ice. This year, I've decided to triple my tomatoe stock. I will double it outside, and grow some indoors. I will grow potatoes for the first time, along with carrots. Beans, Cucumber, Zucinni.. I know I'm forgetting more but I'm rather excited about it.. I only used half my garden that I plowed, so this year I'll have enough food to last me atleast a few months.

HenrikOlsen
2010-Mar-11, 04:38 PM
Did you make a long term plan for crop rotation yet?

Especially the potatoes shouldn't go the same place every year.

Sententia
2010-Mar-11, 04:43 PM
I have a decent amount of land.. I rototilled it for the first time last year. It's in a good spot.. I expect a good year for crops since last year was crappy. I know planes always go past here though, with those chem trails..... Not sure if it has anything to do with anything, but I don't like it for my plants.

PetersCreek
2010-Mar-11, 04:49 PM
We're far from being master gardeners but The WifeŽ and I put two small raised beds in the back yard last year and I'm thinking of adding a third this spring. Nearly half of one was dedicated to herbs and was quite successful. I was especially happy with the rosemary, which grew much more quickly than my previous potted attempts. Of course, the mint grew like a weed but that was okay. I enjoy my mint juleps in the summer.

This year, in addition to the herbs, I think we'll again plant sugar snap peas, carrots, butter lettuce, spinach, and we'll take another stab at beets which didn't finish last time. I hate 'em but she loves them. I don't think we'll try summer squash again. They just didn't yield enough compared to the limited space they took up.

HenrikOlsen
2010-Mar-11, 07:24 PM
I have a decent amount of land.. I rototilled it for the first time last year. It's in a good spot.. I expect a good year for crops since last year was crappy.
Don't use a rototiller unless you really have to, the main effect you have of it is that all the nasty root weeds get their roots cut into nice (for them) bits and planted evenly so they can go really wild.


I know planes always go past here though, with those chem trails..... Not sure if it has anything to do with anything, but I don't like it for my plants.
Chem trails is a myth and contrails don't do anything to your plants and isn't really a good subject in this forum.

I suspect your problem may be with your soil.
You say you rototilled it, that sounds like you had grass before, is that right?

PetersCreek
2010-Mar-11, 07:33 PM
Chem trails is a myth and contrails don't do anything to your plants and isn't really a good subject in this forum.

Repeated for emphasis. The subject of chemtrails belongs in the Conspiracy Theories forum...only. No need to mention it further in this thread.

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Mar-11, 08:21 PM
Sententia, have you checked the ph of you soil some plants like more acidic then others. If you soil is too acidic get some lime. The local garden supply place should have some. Also some plants like more nutrients then others, so you might need to get a couple of different kinds of fertilizer. I found out beets might like more potassium the most and wood ashes are a good source. I am going burn some branches roughly where I am going to plant the beets. To keep the weeds down on thing to do is put something like shredded newspapers where you don't want weeds.
Mine main problem in the past few years was my work schedule. I did not get tilling until the end of May when I had my vacation. Also I had to work like seven days in a row then on my days off it would raining or just rained. Some plants like beans and tomatoes do not like being touched while wet so I stayed away from the garden.

rommel543
2010-Mar-11, 08:39 PM
Sententia, I would try dumping a bunch of manure and peat moss onto the plot and till that in. Also as Davidlpf suggested, get yourself a PH kit from your local gardening store or Big Box home store. Do you know what hardiness zone you live in (wiki (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hardiness_zone))?

HenrikOlsen
2010-Mar-11, 09:05 PM
To keep the weeds down on thing to do is put something like shredded newspapers where you don't want weeds.
Actually a similar trick is to put down newspapers, not shredded, in a thick enough layer that the sun don't get through, then plant through tears in the newspapers or black plastic.
I did that two years ago for a new plot I grew potatoes in, didn't need to hoe the potatoes as the plastic already kept them from getting sun and it finished off the last of the goutweed (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aegopodium) which had previously infected the entire area until I dug the plot and carefully removed all the rhizomes I could find.

It'll also kill off a lot of the annual weeds which will try to germinate but won't succeed in growing to make seeds for next year.

If you use newspaper, you don't even have to remove then, but can just dig through them when preparing for the next year, they'll add to the soil structure.

chrissy
2010-Mar-11, 09:17 PM
Actually a similar trick is to put down newspapers, not shredded, in a thick enough layer that the sun don't get through, then plant through tears in the newspapers or black plastic.
I did that two years ago for a new plot I grew potatoes in, didn't need to hoe the potatoes as the plastic already kept them from getting sun and it finished off the last of the goutweed which had previously infected the entire area until I dug the plot and carefully removed all the rhizomes I could find.

I have used old carpets, no weeds penetrate through the pile and the hessian backing, a lot cheaper and lasts a heck of a lot longer than paper. ;)

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Mar-11, 09:17 PM
Most of the weeds I have are grasses milkweed and horseradish. The horseradish pops up everywhere. I think it is similar to goutweed in the method it spreads. It was started by grandfather years ago. He liked chopped up and put into chopped up pickled beets in kind of a relish. Now I am the only one that likes spicy food so it does not get used at all.

HenrikOlsen
2010-Mar-11, 09:19 PM
Sententia, I would try dumping a bunch of manure and peat moss onto the plot and till that in.
Note that only a few plants can handle fresh manure in the ground.

Potatoes can, so a suggestion I've seen is to add fresh manure and sow rye in the autumn on the plot where you'll have potatoes next spring and simply till the whole shebang in the spring just before putting in the chitted potatoes.
Rye, because while growing it helps take up some of the nutrients and water so less are washed out, the stalks improves the soil structure and it releases chemicals in the soil that prevents other plants from germinating so it works as a weed suppressant that the chitted potatoes will ignore and sown in the autumn it won't have time to seed before getting dug down.
After the potatoes the manure will be broken down and the soil will be well fertilized for the next step in the rotation.

Incidentally, if you do have goutweed a rototiller is just about the absolutely worst thing you can use, it spreads underground through rhizomes which are basically long thin roots and even a fairly small piece can give rise to a new plant, so cutting them in small pieces only means you get very many of them.

chrissy
2010-Mar-11, 09:24 PM
Most of the weeds I have are grasses milkweed and horseradish. The horseradish pops up everywhere. I think it is similar to goutweed in the method it spreads. It was started by grandfather years ago. He liked chopped up and put into chopped up pickled beets in kind of a relish. Now I am the only one that likes spicy food so it does not get used at all.

I love horseradish, it goes ever so well with roast beef. :p I have been trying to find some wild horseradish in the hedgerows to make my own sauce.

I don't understand why you don't use it as it is hot.

HenrikOlsen
2010-Mar-11, 09:25 PM
Most of the weeds I have are grasses milkweed and horseradish. The horseradish pops up everywhere. I think it is similar to goutweed in the method it spreads. It was started by grandfather years ago. He liked chopped up and put into chopped up pickled beets in kind of a relish. Now I am the only one that likes spicy food so it does not get used at all.
The goutweed's rhizomes are fairly shallow, horseradish goes deep as well as sending out underground shoots.

To be honest I wouldn't want either in my garden, horseradish can also be hard to get rid of once it's established.

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Mar-11, 09:25 PM
I have got to start using it myself.

HenrikOlsen
2010-Mar-11, 09:38 PM
Note that the old roots grow woody and tasteless, but dig them up (helps control them too) and plant one or two 10cm pieces, then harvest when they've grown next year.

Sententia
2010-Mar-11, 10:58 PM
Sententia, have you checked the ph of you soil some plants like more acidic then others. If you soil is too acidic get some lime. The local garden supply place should have some. Also some plants like more nutrients then others, so you might need to get a couple of different kinds of fertilizer. I found out beets might like more potassium the most and wood ashes are a good source. I am going burn some branches roughly where I am going to plant the beets. To keep the weeds down on thing to do is put something like shredded newspapers where you don't want weeds.
Mine main problem in the past few years was my work schedule. I did not get tilling until the end of May when I had my vacation. Also I had to work like seven days in a row then on my days off it would raining or just rained. Some plants like beans and tomatoes do not like being touched while wet so I stayed away from the garden.

I never got that deep into the whole thing. I know I got a decent amount of beans... Huge cucumbers, some I picked earlier than others.. and I got around.. 20 decent tomatoes. I'm forgetting some others.

I used organic fertilizer, I'll probably use that again because it was good

HenrikOlsen
2010-Mar-11, 11:19 PM
Have you been taking good care of your earthworms?

One philosophy of gardening is that if you treat your garden as a zoo with a main purpose of growing earthworms, everything you put in the ground will flourish.

Sententia
2010-Mar-11, 11:22 PM
Have you been taking good care of your earthworms?

One philosophy of gardening is that if you treat your garden as a zoo with a main purpose of growing earthworms, everything you put in the ground will flourish.

I chased a few chipmunks , rabbits out of there .. I know I got a possom living around here somewhere ... I'd like to build some kind of fence to really prevent the wild, instead of inviting it into the area.. But I have seen worms in my garden.

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Mar-11, 11:52 PM
The only wildlife that bugs my garden is deer, but one trick is to plant marigolds and the scent keeps them out. I have noticed that there aren't many worms in the garden I would like more.

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Mar-11, 11:54 PM
I never got that deep into the whole thing. I know I got a decent amount of beans... Huge cucumbers, some I picked earlier than others.. and I got around.. 20 decent tomatoes. I'm forgetting some others.

I used organic fertilizer, I'll probably use that again because it was good
Cucumbers, squash and pumpkins are heavy feeders so if you have enough fertilizer they will do well.

jokergirl
2010-Mar-12, 11:34 AM
You can plant squashes straight on the compost heap, they love it...

;)

Trebuchet
2010-Mar-12, 04:45 PM
Most of the weeds I have are grasses milkweed and horseradish. The horseradish pops up everywhere. I think it is similar to goutweed in the method it spreads. It was started by grandfather years ago. He liked chopped up and put into chopped up pickled beets in kind of a relish. Now I am the only one that likes spicy food so it does not get used at all.

I spent 3 years getting rid of the horseradish the former owner had planted when bought our vacation home. We like horseradish and did harvest and use some but I couldn't tolerate the way it spread into everything else. When we moved in, it had been planted in a small raised box but was coming up around the edges. The next summer it had spread to a five foot radius and I started taking it out. We had it coming up as much as 20 feet away by the time I finally got rid of it.

The eradication method boiled down to nothing more than persistence. Daily visits to the garden (when we were there) and digging out of any new sprouts, with careful attention to removing every possible bit of root.

The garden, which was a thing of beauty a few years ago, is now a total mess. I haven't been able to tend it the past couple of years due to caring for my parents. Now that they are gone, I'm thinking of retiring and spending the summer there. Perhaps I can get it back into shape.

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Mar-12, 05:06 PM
The horseradish is spread out over several acres so I have the feeling it is pretty much immortal at this point.

Trebuchet
2010-Mar-12, 07:52 PM
The horseradish is spread out over several acres so I have the feeling it is pretty much immortal at this point.

Ouch. The less green side of me wants to suggest chemicals except when I was battling it I found them not very effective.

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Mar-12, 07:56 PM
I'll just have to just dig up the ones in the garden. There are also some poplar trees that are probably just stems of the same tree with a similar root system as the horse radish. I just cut down the ones I don't want and keep a few for shade for the house and lawn.

HenrikOlsen
2010-Mar-14, 09:50 PM
Went to the garden today, ground is still frozen about a foot down.
Going to be a bit of a mess as I'll be receiving 24 bare rooted apple trees for grafting Tuesday or Wednesday.

Anyone have any suggestions for keeping them alive for a couple of weeks until I can get them permanently planted?

Torsten
2010-Mar-15, 12:09 AM
Not sure of what to do to ensure their survival for that period, but perhaps you can hasten the thawing by placing some clear plastic over the ground in which you intend to plant them, in essence creating a temporary green house over that area so that a stronger wave of heat penetrates the ground.

Ivan Viehoff
2010-Mar-15, 06:26 PM
Went to the garden today, ground is still frozen about a foot down.
Going to be a bit of a mess as I'll be receiving 24 bare rooted apple trees for grafting Tuesday or Wednesday.
Anyone have any suggestions for keeping them alive for a couple of weeks until I can get them permanently planted?
Do you have access to some unfrozen soil? Lie the trees on their sides, with the roots in a bit of a trench if possible, and cover their roots over with a mound of soil. This is called "heeling them in" and is a technique to delay permanent planting of bare root fruit trees.

closetgeek
2010-Mar-16, 01:08 PM
This winter killed my baby palm tree and we are currently waiting to be sure the frost is over before planting another. My garden is a sad state of affairs, at the moment. There are no longer pretty green shrubs lining the edge, just masses of brown bare sticks. I've been told to cut them down to the base and they will grow back but I would like to do something to stop the Munsters Go Home, notes left in my mailbox.

Fazor
2010-Mar-31, 06:08 PM
Looking for some advice on killing trees. We get these annoying little saplings [edit to clarify: I said 'saplings', but at the base they're about the diameter of a quarter, on the small side, and silver dollar on the larger]that grow, and most of them are just that--annoying. But there are a few that grow in some very inconvenient places. For instance, there's on that comes up between the brick chimney (that runs, obviously, all the way to the ground) and the sidewalk. The gap between the two is probably only two inches, making it impossible to dig very far down. We cut it back all the time, but I get tired of having to cut every other week (stupid things grow like weeds!).

There's another that's growing from beneath the sidewalk. (Root comes out and curves around so that the tree grows next to the side walk, but we can't get to the main root). And there's one or two that grow in the fence, where I likewise can't really get at the roots.

I've read that salting the area will kill them, but most of these trees come up in the garden, and I don't want the things that are supposed to grow to get killed off. Would cutting them back and burning the ends of the stump keep them from growing until they die? Or would they just sprout a new "branch"?

HenrikOlsen
2010-Mar-31, 06:31 PM
Before anyone suggests it, the copper nail "trick" is a myth.

Fazor
2010-Mar-31, 06:37 PM
Before anyone suggests it, the copper nail "trick" is a myth.
I had seen that one, and a few other "interesting" suggestions on various other sites. No mention yet on whether or not "rare earth magnets can channel the growth energy away from the plant, killing the roots!" . . . hell, maybe I just discovered the next great infomercial product!

. . . anyway, I saw a lot of suggestions for various herbicides, but again, I don't want to risk the soil/plants around the trees. Also, I have dogs, and I'd much prefer a method that won't poison them.

rommel543
2010-Mar-31, 07:22 PM
We had a problem with carigannas growing in my parent's yard. The only way you can get rid of those is rip out the roots, and the roots go all over the place. A single bush of them that above ground 3 foot radius coved about 8 underground. Huge mess ripping it out.

HenrikOlsen
2010-Mar-31, 08:28 PM
Caragana (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caragana_arborescens)?

Trebuchet
2010-Mar-31, 11:19 PM
Looking for some advice on killing trees. We get these annoying little saplings [edit to clarify: I said 'saplings', but at the base they're about the diameter of a quarter, on the small side, and silver dollar on the larger]that grow, and most of them are just that--annoying. But there are a few that grow in some very inconvenient places. For instance, there's on that comes up between the brick chimney (that runs, obviously, all the way to the ground) and the sidewalk. The gap between the two is probably only two inches, making it impossible to dig very far down. We cut it back all the time, but I get tired of having to cut every other week (stupid things grow like weeds!).

There's another that's growing from beneath the sidewalk. (Root comes out and curves around so that the tree grows next to the side walk, but we can't get to the main root). And there's one or two that grow in the fence, where I likewise can't really get at the roots.

I've read that salting the area will kill them, but most of these trees come up in the garden, and I don't want the things that are supposed to grow to get killed off. Would cutting them back and burning the ends of the stump keep them from growing until they die? Or would they just sprout a new "branch"?

What type of trees? They're likely coming up from the roots of some nearby (or even not so nearby) well established tree. Anything that's a fruit with a pit (cherry, plum, apricot, etc.) is very prone to doing this. I'll never have another of those in my yard, if I can help it. I've not found any good solution to the problem, either. It might be you could dig down and cut the roots nearer the main tree but they'll grow back.

Fazor
2010-Apr-01, 12:59 AM
Silver maple, I'd guess. No trees around anymore, but there was one in the back yard five years ago. But for these to be that root system, they'd have to have gone down under and across the basement. We get thousands of those stupid whirly seeds each fall from trees down the block. I hate those things.

BigDon
2010-Apr-28, 06:51 PM
My post got eaten by the "you are not logged in" monster...

It was a long one too...

Fazor
2010-Apr-28, 06:56 PM
My post got eaten by the "you are not logged in" monster...

It was a long one too...

Bah. And I've been waiting for it since you posted your "I'm back" thread (yesterday?)

BigDon
2010-Apr-29, 04:40 AM
Only for you, Faz... :) I went and dug out some stumps to blow off steam and my hands are a bit sore.

After the city dept, who did an absolutely fabulous job pruning the trees mistook a loquat I've been tending for eight years for a big weed and dug it out and ran it through a chipper, I was a bit gutted.

It was stunted for it's age due to growing in heavy shade, but I had it well fed and it was beginning to develope three seperate canopies and still not ten feet tall. It was growing next to the city owned tree and had survived two previous pruning episodes, but I was sick most of the winter this time and didn't even think of it when my sister called me and told me the city crews were there. I know the crew's work and actually looked forward to seeing the trees. (And they did yeoman work. I don't have to move a rose bed anymore.)

Then the next week my stepfather went to work in the yard and took out a bed of spider plants I planted when Boo was small, and a bed a small fushias. I then decided I couldn't afford to be sick any more and spent the last couple of weeks working on the yard and my various tanks.

I bought a novelty multigraft plum with four kinds on one root stock. Specific for the peninsula. Found a nice sunny spot for it in the back yard. Also a pair of grapes, Seedless Concords (var. Mars) Put them in a good southern exposure along the last of the bare fence.

Fazor
2010-Apr-29, 01:34 PM
How's the growing season been out there thus far? We've had a warmer than average March-to-April, and so everything here is growing like wildfire. The past two nights there's been some heavy freezing, I guess. I'm in the city, and I haven't seen it, but my co-worker lives a bit further out and said out there was pretty well frozen.

I don't have any plants; haven't planted anything yet this year, and at the end of last year, tore out most of the scraps of whatever we had left in anticipation of some re-working of the gardens this year. The one thing we have that bloomed was our pathetic lilac bush. It just never blooms as fully as our neighbor's, but it was in poor shape until we pruned it back about two years ago, and I think it's just taking a few seasons to fully recover. There's also some very annoying vine plant that grows all through it during the summer; it's not during it's bloom period but it may be stealing enough nutrients to hurt it. I swear I cut that thing down, pull it out, nuke it from space, etc., multiple times every year, but the damnedable thing just keeps coming back. Both plants are along the fence (chainlink) and the vine just loves that.

Two years ago I got sick of fighting the vine and let it go. There's actually two kinds. One's a flowering vine that wouldn't be half bad if it wasn't so pesky. The other turned out to be wild grapes; they were sure fun to gut out of the fence at full size.

I have to head to Columbus this afternoon for a meeting; that puts my parent's house on the way back after work. If the weather holds--and I think it's supposed to--I may try to swing by and borrow my dad's truck and till so I can till up the flowerbed around the deck, the stupid patch of wild grass between our yard and where we park in back, and till up a little garden for us to grow some veggies this year. Tara's bosses' father-in-law (no room mates involved, at least) has some tomato plants he wants to give us. I want to grow some peppers. Not sure what else.

mike alexander
2010-Apr-29, 02:08 PM
I have a similar problem with horsetails (I think of them as dinosaur asparagus), which also spread by underground rhyzomes. Amazingly tough, persistent things. I just wait for them to get about six inches tall and then pull them out, hoping over time to discourage them. Must've pulled a couple of hundred last week from a small bed in front of the house.

Fazor
2010-Apr-29, 02:11 PM
I have a similar problem with horsetails (I think of them as dinosaur asparagus), which also spread by underground rhyzomes. Amazingly tough, persistent things. I just wait for them to get about six inches tall and then pull them out, hoping over time to discourage them. Must've pulled a couple of hundred last week from a small bed in front of the house.

Blah. You're supposed to tell me there's some magical cure made from common household materials, like soda mixed with mustard (of the brown variety), that when a drop is placed on an unwanted plant, it will magically wither and die all the way down through the roots! Oh well.

BigDon
2010-Apr-29, 03:05 PM
Blah. You're supposed to tell me there's some magical cure made from common household materials, like soda mixed with mustard (of the brown variety), that when a drop is placed on an unwanted plant, it will magically wither and die all the way down through the roots! Oh well.

Ever see what cooking oil, like Wesson, does to plants? (Go ahead, check it out. Just not on plants you like.)

Plus I got to work with some absolutely terrifying herbicides in my greenhouse days. We had one butthead who didn't believe the proper mix was one drop per 55 gallons of water. (Made in 2000 gallon batchs usually. Achieves satisfatory results within three days with minimal regrowth. Often used as a pretreatment for future parking lots and roadways.) He wanted just enough to clear a 80 foot by ten foot area between greenhouses that was going to be regravelled and didn't want to do the math. Some obnoxious, like mint. It was coming under the greenhouse's foundation and invading them as well

There was a major session of "What the *heck* did you do!" when the guys work was checked a few hours later and all the top growth in the sprayed area had literally liquified. He exceeded the labelling directions a wee bit. (And was too high up the food chain for me to really impress with my displeasure. One of the drawbacks of working for a large privately owned company. Lower level workers with pull.) Probably still barren to this day.

Fazor
2010-Apr-29, 03:12 PM
There was a major session of "What the *heck* did you do!" when the guys work was checked a few hours later and all the top growth in the sprayed area had literally liquified. He exceeded the labelling directions a wee bit.
Ha! Tempting . . . :whistle:

I'm gunshy with any type of chemical treatment for these particular plants because they're in the back yard, and I have dogs. I'm just still in the denial phase of admitting I need to use the weedwacker more than once a month. That's one chore I really don't like. Just imagine if my yard was more than about a quarter acre! Heh.

BigDon
2010-Apr-29, 03:40 PM
Well then try the first option.

Fill a small cheap spray bottle with Wesson oil and spray the top growth. Spray in the morning and it will be dead by noon or sooner. (You asked for dramatic results) The oil triggers massive collapse of all the upper folliage of almost all vascular plants. Nothing is immortal and they can only respawn from underground stores three or four times, max. (usually twice, in my experiance) I've taken out pampas grass with that method. Pampas grass stops bulldozers. You have something that fights bulldozers? And salad oil is probably good for your dog's coat. Or give him the screaming runs, I'm not sure which.

(Don't you know any better than to ask for advice on the internet? There's all kinds of loonies out there!)

slang
2010-Apr-29, 10:54 PM
Ever see what cooking oil, like Wesson, does to plants? (Go ahead, check it out. Just not on plants you like.)

Hmm.. maybe. Saw what spilling a little lamp oil appeared to do a 3 by 3 ft shrub. Directly affected branches died almost immediately, and now, months later, so much of the plant seemed dead, we ripped it out to do something else with the space. But.. it could also have died of our rather more severe than usual winter.

HenrikOlsen
2010-Apr-30, 04:43 AM
Fill a small cheap spray bottle with Wesson oil and spray the top growth. Spray in the morning and it will be dead by noon or sooner. (You asked for dramatic results) The oil triggers massive collapse of all the upper folliage of almost all vascular plants. Nothing is immortal and they can only respawn from underground stores three or four times, max.
Sounds like something to try on the ground-elder/goutweed (Aegopodium podagraria) once the back garden clears up from its impeding invasion of construction machinery.

When I mentioned grafting 24 apple trees in another thread, you mentioned having room for them. Currently they're in a temporary bed while I'm waiting for their grafts to take. The plan is that when the construction machinery is gone in about a years time and has finished converted what was previously an overgrown slope into a 20' high, 40' wide SSE facing wall, I'm going to go seriously nuts with espaliering.
I picked M7 as the optimal rootstock for that, as it's dwarfing enough that it won't fight espaliering too much, but still vigorous enough to try, thus hopefully making it possible to provoke it to grow as I want it to.

1) My garden has a 4 lane motorway/freeway as its northern neighbor and they're expanding that to 6 lanes. I'm definitely looking forward to it, as that will replace a basically useless slope straight up to the road with no noise control, with a vertical wall with a 12' noise absorbing wall on top. And though the 3' closest to the wall isn't mine, I'm allowed to plant anything I want there.:D

HenrikOlsen
2010-May-01, 05:43 PM
I've been to the garden for the first time in about a week, and the apple trees are starting to show signs of some of the grafts succeeding, with a greening of the buds on the scion. Many of them were also trying to bud below the graft which is good as it shows the roots have established themselves enough to support the rest, but as they'll take energy and water from the scion I removed all of the buds below the graft.

And I've learned something new about Peonies: If people try to tell you that peonies are delicate fragile things, they don't know what they're talking about.
A bit of additional information is probably needed to set up the situation. When I got the garden about three years ago, my then girlfriend had never had a garden before and was prone to bouts of Toad (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mr._Toad)-like enthusiasm when starting something new1, so when we got is she decided to put one part aside as a rose garden. Being the nice guy I am, I let her do what she wanted with it, which resulted in the planting of 4 roses and the moving of 3 peonies (in Danish, one of the names for the European Peony (Paeonia officinalis) is Bonderose, literally Farmer's Rose, so she was of the opinion that they belonged there).
This was subsequently a slight point of disagreement between us and after she died last year I decided to get rid of them, both in order to make it a "real" rose garden and because they grow so big that one of them was completely overhanging one of the smaller neighboring rose bushes, and I went about it in fastest and most effortless way I could think of which was by redefined them as part of the lawn, and I subsequently ran them over with the lawnmower repeatedly over the rest of the autumn while mowing.
Now all three are shooting as if nothing had happened and are already several inches high forming a dense pillow of shoots. Those things are tough!

1) another example of her enthusiasm was that she'd read that comfrey's good for producing organic fertilizer in the garden2, so after we'd bought two she experimented with various ways of multiplying them in order to get lots of fertilizer, ranging from the traditional cutting the plant into a couple of pieces with a spade and planting each, to simply cutting leaves off and sticking them in the ground. Almost every attempt succeeded including simply sticking leaves in the ground, so now I have 15 plants and have to cut them clean to the ground every other month or so to keep them from taking over everything, but at least I have plenty of greens for the compost and for producing fertilizer extract. I filled a 30 liter milk pail completely with comfrey leaves I picked today.

2) It isn't a nitrogen fixer like the legumens but it has a very deep tap root so it can access nutrients not accessible by most other plants and bring them to the surface.

slang
2010-May-02, 07:46 AM
(in Danish, one of the names for the European Peony (Paeonia officinalis) is Bonderose, literally Farmer's Rose, so she was of the opinion that they belonged there).

(In Dutch it's "pioenroos", pee-oon-rose)

In our backyard we have a shrub (actually 2 close together) of Red currant (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redcurrant). It does well and gave us a lot of berries last year. Considering the amount of berries already starting to grow, this year should be good too. But.. it suffers from small green caterpillars (a few mm in size, comparable to a grain of rice). From earlier experience I know I have to act quickly or the entire shrub will be without leaves. Is there any "friendly" way to get rid of these critters, except hand-picking? Or will it require a trip to the store for some kind of pesticide?

12951 12952

flynjack1
2010-May-02, 05:29 PM
Wow, great thread! I have started to take interest in gardening the last few years and this year I got my vegetables out last weekend. This weekend of course I had to cover my little garden which is inside my dog pen to prevent frost damage. We are experiencing a late cold streak roughly 20 degrees below normal. My garden space is small but I also have about the property a large grape plant(yields 40 lbs of green grapes) , raspberries 2nd season (no yields yet), and strawberries that have done well the last couple years. The grapes are in bloom, the strawberries well on their way, and from the one raspberries plant that I put in last year I now have about 6 stalks.

Any suggestions on ensuring that my raspberries fruit? I have friends who claimed that they never could get their raspberries to bear fruit. I have been adding coffee grounds to my strawberry patch as I was told this is good for them, and will help their yield. Are coffee grounds good for the tomato's too? Any word on what to use coffee grounds with or to avoid using on.

HenrikOlsen
2010-May-02, 06:04 PM
When did you cut the raspberry canes?

If they're regular raspberries you should be aware that they're likely a summer bearing variety, which means they bear fruit early to midsummer on second year canes, so you have to be careful about which canes you cut, when.

One way to have summer bearing raspberries (as they're known) is to grow them in a row with a double trellis so you can tie one year's canes on one side while having last year's canes on the other. Once the second year canes are done fruiting, you cut them an inch off the ground, they won't bear any more fruit anyway, this frees that side of the trellis for next year's growth.
The advantage is that when you don't have first and second year canes entangled, there's less risk of damaging the new ones when you remove the old.

As for coffee grounds I put them in the compost heap, saves thinking and the filter can go too.

flynjack1
2010-May-02, 06:39 PM
I cut the canes back last fall to about 2 inches from the ground. Suddenly this spring I found several new canes comming up beside the orginal plant, interestingly they actually showed more growth than the original canes, but the orginal canes do show some greening. So I would assume from what you have said that the canes from last year should bear fruit but the new ones will probably not. Typically here in New Mexico the raspberries fruit in the late summer but that is further North in the State so I dont know exactly what to expect here in town.

Its funny about the coffee grounds, the local Star Bucks coffee shops are slammed with gardeners taking their grounds by the sack full. My timing at getting to Star Bucks in time to get their grounds seems poor so I have been making do with my own. I was told by my barber that coffee grounds are exceptionally good for strawberries and should be hand mixed right into the soil around the plants. I have given this a try so we'll see how that fairs. Our local soils are sandy and probably more base than acid. Roses grow here like weeds though I have managed to kill one in my front yard.

HenrikOlsen
2010-May-02, 07:05 PM
I cut the canes back last fall to about 2 inches from the ground. Suddenly this spring I found several new canes comming up beside the orginal plant, interestingly they actually showed more growth than the original canes, but the orginal canes do show some greening. So I would assume from what you have said that the canes from last year should bear fruit but the new ones will probably not. Typically here in New Mexico the raspberries fruit in the late summer but that is further North in the State so I dont know exactly what to expect here in town.
When raspberries bear fruit depends more on which type they are than on where they're grown, I expect the late summer bearing is because it's an autumn bearing variety.
Those will start bearing fruit late summer and if picked regularly will continue to do so through a fairly long period lasting into autumn, while the summer bearing will have a short but intense period in early to mid summer, depending on the exact variety.

Raspberries, both summer and autumn bearing will make new shoots readily, vigorously, and once settled, all over the place including where you don't want them, their main way of multiplying is by sending roots in all directions and putting up shoots every foot or two.

When I talk about second year canes it's not about new growth on top of old stumps, it's canes that have been allowed to keep their full length since last year (possibly with the top shortened to 6-7 feet for ease of picking next year).
Basically they should be allowed to grow as they like for 1˝ year, then get cut all the way down so they're replace by the new shoots that have been growing since spring.

Sadly, I suspect you won't get any this year either but if you let them keep their height until next year you should get lots.
I actually planted a row of summer bearing raspberries late last year and they're only now starting to seriously shoot so I'm in exactly the same situation myself.

chrissy
2010-May-02, 07:27 PM
I used to cut my raspberries in the Autumn (fall) and they used to give me loads of fruit in the summer, I couldn't keep up with picking them.
Coffee grounds are good for the garden and they also keep the evil slugs away and the kittehs off the garden, they don't like the taste of it when they clean their paws. Mwhahahaha.

flynjack1
2010-May-03, 01:32 AM
Ha Ha that should prove fun with my cat Josey. As I keep the dog out by planting most of my garden in the dog kennel...the cat has no problem getting in and out whenever she cares too. Fortunately my dog (anAustrailan Shepard) doesnt know she could easily jump over our back wall so hence the lack of need for the kennel. Of couse if I leave the kennel door open she loves to dig around in the damp garden soil. She does have access to my strawberries and I catch her occassionally helping herself to them. As far as the raspberrries go Ill hope for the best and keep your pruning suggestions in mind. Thanks all!

rommel543
2010-May-03, 04:12 PM
(In Dutch it's "pioenroos", pee-oon-rose)

In our backyard we have a shrub (actually 2 close together) of Red currant (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redcurrant). It does well and gave us a lot of berries last year. Considering the amount of berries already starting to grow, this year should be good too. But.. it suffers from small green caterpillars (a few mm in size, comparable to a grain of rice). From earlier experience I know I have to act quickly or the entire shrub will be without leaves. Is there any "friendly" way to get rid of these critters, except hand-picking? Or will it require a trip to the store for some kind of pesticide?

12951 12952

I'm wondering if they are Box Tree Caterpillars

Does this sound like them?


The eggs are laid in a flat sheet, overlapping each other, on the underside of box leaves. When first laid, they are pale yellow and difficult to see, but as they mature, the eggs develop a black spot where each larval head capsule is forming.
Newly hatched larvae are coloured greenish yellow, with black heads. As the larvae get older, the head stays black and the green body develops dark brown stripes. Mature larvae retain the green ground colour to their bodies, and develop a striking pattern of thick black and thin white stripes along the length of the body, with large black dots outlined in white on the dorsal side. They are up to 4 cm long.

If it does the mainly list chemical treatments.

http://www.hortweek.com/News/EmailThisArticle/983420/FERA-PLANT-PEST-FACTSHEET-Box-tree-caterpillar-Diaphania-perspectalis/

slang
2010-May-03, 04:44 PM
I'm wondering if they are Box Tree Caterpillars

Does this sound like them?

Not really, ours are much smaller, and (what I think are) the eggs seem to be somewhat individually placed. Thanks though.

chrissy
2010-May-03, 08:17 PM
(In Dutch it's "pioenroos", pee-oon-rose)

In our backyard we have a shrub (actually 2 close together) of Red currant (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redcurrant). It does well and gave us a lot of berries last year. Considering the amount of berries already starting to grow, this year should be good too. But.. it suffers from small green caterpillars (a few mm in size, comparable to a grain of rice). From earlier experience I know I have to act quickly or the entire shrub will be without leaves. Is there any "friendly" way to get rid of these critters, except hand-picking? Or will it require a trip to the store for some kind of pesticide?

12951 12952

I'm just wondering if those critters change colour a bit more as they get a bit older ie: does it get black spots on it later? If so they are magpie moths, then a spray with Bifenthrin - a contact insecticide, will bring them under control. This is best done before the flowers are open, or after petal drop. This prevents any accidental damage to friendly pollinating insects. :)
I have used just plain old washing up liquid and a bit of water in a spray bottle, they don't like the taste of it.

chrissy
2010-May-03, 08:26 PM
Or it could be an Angle shades (http://www.gardensafari.net/english/picpages/phlogophora_meticulosa.htm), these are very common and beautiful to look at when they have pupated into a moth.

slang
2010-May-03, 08:42 PM
Thanks. I put a couple aside, to see what they'll do. I wouldn't mind them if they only took some leaves, but they take them all and quickly too.

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-May-05, 08:44 PM
Got the some beets and peas in today. Did not get around to burning the brush the weather has been to warm. dry and windy for fires, used some ashes from wood stove for the beets. And one of the cherry trees are already blooming. (http://www.flickr.com/photos/31720387@N07/4581805563/)

BigDon
2010-May-06, 04:15 AM
Well today I filled that spot in the front that always gets too much sun and wind with a tall container that I put a zonal geranium, with metalic crimson blossoms, surrounded by purslane. I could never find purslane before because one; I didn't know what in was called and two, I thought it was a miniature iceplant and kept asking for the wrong thing.

I found it today on a long shopping trip to the local nursury. Dropped another hundred bucks on color, pots and potting soils.

I made a cactus bowl today as well. I told people I was thinking of making one and friends bought me two. Both were commercial bowls that are using immature spiney succulents I know I could grow into effective cattle barriers in about three years. The bowl I made today are all cacti and lithops I know have startling flowers and stay reasonable sized for bowl life. As a matter of fact at the moment the bowl looks a little empty as I allowed for growth and budding. And I know no less than two people who have extensive and beautiful cactus gardens.

Now Treb mentioned trouble with stone fruits like plums. I just bought one for the first time. It's already swelling plums on it. I am now delaying putting it in the ground in my parent's paved backyard. I was going to hire a contractor to remove a 3 x 3 foot section of concrete. Since all the different plums are grafted on a quality rootstock, shouldn't that mean it's a little tamer than a seed grown plum sucker and shoot wise?

Fazor
2010-May-06, 03:02 PM
I didn't do anything that fancy. I did have my father bring out his tiller, and since he beat me home he did most of the tilling. So if the rain holds off (though I don't think it's supposed to), I have a few fresh beds that need raked and planted. One I'm just going to seed for grass, one (back by where we park our cars) will probably get the 'ol mulch treatment, because I'm tired of dealing with the weeds. The last is going to be our vegetable garden. We have five tomato plants living on our kitchen windowsill (it's supposed to get cold this weekend, so we're holding off on planting them until next week). We also bought some various seeds; a few different peppers, lettuce, ... um ... other things? I forget. And a whole lot of herbs. I'm going to start the other veggies inside, as we did last year and it worked much better. The problem was, we never were able to get a garden tilled, so our starts never made it past, well, starting. :)

HenrikOlsen
2010-May-06, 05:32 PM
Since all the different plums are grafted on a quality rootstock, shouldn't that mean it's a little tamer than a seed grown plum sucker and shoot wise?

It should be a little tamer, though not to the same extent as e.g. apples where the dwarfing range of rootstock is immense.
Really dwarfing rootstock hasn't been found yet for plums, so a little tamer is probably exactly what you'll get.

RalofTyr
2010-May-07, 12:18 AM
Well, I dug out my garden soil, which is mostly hard clay. I created a dam to catch all the water that runs off from watering the lawn and other things like rain at the property edge. Then, I filled the garden with soil and sand.

There's a ton of stuff piled everywhere, so I use pots to grow most of my vegetables.

Oh, I only grow food. You can't eat flowers.

Here's an inventory of all my plants

7 Beans (Snap: Vines)
2 Beets
13 Corn
4 Melons
2 Peppers
5 Potatoes
6 Tomatoes
20 Tomatoes, Cherry
5 Zucchini

I only have the space of a queen-sized bed to work with. So I have to maximize everything.

Cherry Tomatoes grow like weeds; even ever a cherry tomato goes bad or gets half way eaten by a worm, I simply throw it in the dirt and next year, it grows. I usually give them to coworkers in pea pots.

I'm actually quite pleased with growing corn and potatoes. If civilization should ever collapse, due to Peak oil or what not, those two plants are staples for a good diet.

I bought a ten pound bag of potatoes for a dollar, but I couldn't finish them before they started growing. I throw one in a planter in mid-Feb. The winter monsoons came and the plant grew and then, a few weeks ago, it died. While preparing the soil for a zucchini, I dug up several small potatoes. I'm quite pleased with that.

BigDon
2010-May-07, 03:46 PM
Ral, I can grow potatoes like nobody's business around here but corn just doesn't do well at all. As a teen my family started a couple of vegetable plots and we were wildly successful with the spuds and collairds. And though I haven't done it myself, tomatoe growing is almost a cult locally. What with all the Italian, Portuguese and Mexicans that live here.

Ral, as far as corn and The Big Collapse go, educate yourself on "nixtamalization". That's very important, or your colony could suffer from pelagra (AKA Spanish leprosy) should your potatoes get honked by something. (You can actually live on potatoes alone. A nutritional researcher ate nothing but spuds for a year and suffered no defects.) It's a pretreatment for corn that allows for the niacin in the corn to be liberated. Otherwise the niacin is unavailble.

Edit to add link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nixtamalization

Fazor
2010-May-07, 03:51 PM
A nutritional researcher ate nothing but spuds for a year and suffered no defects.) It's a pretreatment for corn that allows for the niacin in the corn to be liberated. Otherwise the niacin is unavailble.
Alton said something about that on a 'Good Eats' that I recently recorded (about making tamales). I haven't actually watched the episode yet (Tara's not really interested, so waiting for the rare occasion that I'm watching tv when she's not), but it was in the first minute or two before I changed the channel.

I wasn't going to plant corn this year, but now that I think about making fresh corn meal for tamales, I might just have to!

BigDon
2010-May-07, 04:12 PM
Oh, as the bare root grapes I bought were kind of "iffy" to the point the greenhousemen gave me a discount, I planted six hoping for two and it looks like four are going to make it. Two varieties of seedless Concords. As I know a couple of locals also have grapes in their yards I'm going to mooch off of them as pollenizers. ;)

Seedless grapes produce sterile pollen. The ones I have (var. Mars) can produce without a pollenizer but produce larger yields with one. I'm greatly looking forward to small scale vinticulture (I think it's called.) If the four get really well established I my plant my own pollenizer, just to be sure.

BigDon
2010-May-07, 04:28 PM
Hey Fazor, did I ever tell you the story of my Dad's corn field? Not a commercial sized one, just a big back yard corn plot. Dad lived in the Williamette valley near Roseburg on a half acre plot.

Since the house was set forward on the property the back lawn was brutal to mow and needed doing weekly. So Dad had the back yard sub-divided. Hmmm, this is going to be a big long story so I probably should give it it's own thread. And I owe ABR. the terrarium report first as far as big long stories go. Well these stories don't write themselves.

Faz, let me get ABR his story then I'll do this one. But first...er I need a cup of coffee. Going idle for about ten.

BD

HenrikOlsen
2010-May-08, 01:37 PM
I'm greatly looking forward to small scale vinticulture (I think it's called.)
It's viticulture if you're talking about growing grapes.
It's viniculture if you're talking about growing grapes to make wine.

I have a single vine, currently about to enter its third year of training where it's planted.
I don't expect much from it production wise, as it was picked as an impulse buy at the nursery during a shopping spree, so I'm basically playing around trying to learn how to train one before I start laying out money for a more well researched selection.

I selected that specific system of training because a lack of space where it's growing meant I require tall narrow growth and don't have space for multiple trunks and/or long side canes. Being tall also reduces the risk of frost damage which definitely was a bonus with this winter.
So far the permanent structure has been established and this year the exercise will be about establishing 2-3 spur systems on each horizontal branch. Being one year old, they really want to produce grapes this year but as I really want side growth to establish things for next year, I don't intend to allow them to:naughty:

RalofTyr
2010-May-10, 11:06 PM
I'll have to look into, "nixtamalization". From what I've read, it also enriches corn with vitamins; so it's like taking a daily vitamin as well.

I've increased watering. Instead of watering when the ground is dry, which is about one or twice a week, I water every two days; side effect, the ground's always muddy, but the tomatoes are really growing.

BigDon
2010-May-11, 09:39 PM
Henrik, just a cursory read through on "viniculture" (thanks) shows me it's probably better if I go with "viticulture". I like to have plants I can spoil with love and affection and doing that to wine grapes leads to an inferior product. (for the folks at home, it makes too much sugar and the result is similar to MD 20/20

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-May-19, 07:13 PM
A week ago Monday I finally went to the local nursery at got the first round of seeds and plants and went a little overboard already. Got the usual veggies and few new ones. I had to expand the garden slightly for all the veggies to fit in.

As for berries we have then everywhere, well wild varieties we have raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, and even wild strawberries but the fruit are so tiny.

We also have a grapevine. The problem with the grapevine is it grew up an apple tree now I have train to grow so we can get to the grapes.

BigDon
2010-May-22, 08:18 AM
Well it looks like all six vines are going to live. Checked them today.

They were so sad that the nursery man dropped the price from ten dollars to 50 cents a piece. A guess in a couple of years I'm going to be one grape-eating son of a gun..The happier ones have side shoots about two inchs long and the ones that were really sad are peeking little green sprouts, like potatoe eyes.

BigDon
2010-May-22, 08:35 AM
First I have a question about my valencia orange I planted last fall.

It's still less than waist high, but it's covered in buds. Would it benefit the tree if I removed the buds at this time? Put more energy into growth?

The plum tree I mentioned is still in it's five gallon container and it has a lot of plums al most of it's branches. I'm thinking maybe keeping the concret intact and planting in the tree peony I have place. Move the Peony to a large container. Two reasons to hesitate to supplant the peony with the plum are the peony has started to bloom regularly after almost ten years of not and sometime in the future there may be a issue of the crowns of the plum and the valencia crowding each other the trunks being only twelve feet apart.

No, maybe I will go ahead and hire that contractor.

BigDon
2010-May-22, 08:36 AM
After reading that last post I think I should log out now and go to bed. Goodnight everybody.

geonuc
2010-May-22, 10:37 AM
After reading that last post I think I should log out now and go to bed. Goodnight everybody.

Good move. :)

HenrikOlsen
2010-May-22, 03:04 PM
It's still less than waist high, but it's covered in buds. Would it benefit the tree if I removed the buds at this time? Put more energy into growth?
Flower/fruit buds or branch buds?
I'm guessing it's still stressed from the recent planting and is in emergency procreation mode.
You'll definitely want to remove most of the potential fruits this year, though I don't think it'll be too bad if you wait until it's flowered so you have the benefit of the prettiness.
An attempted large crop might push it into a biannual cycle and will likely stunt its growth at a time where you want that instead of fruits.
Perhaps keep a couple so you get a chance to taste them.

Are you pruning/training it yet?

Note that this advice is based on what I know about other fruit trees, most notably apple and plum. I'm assuming the fundamentals are similar though the details are likely not so much.

BigDon
2010-May-22, 07:09 PM
Oh, the orange has flower buds Henrik. Petals, a few olive sized fruits and everything. I plan on putting a circular bench around the trunk once the crown clears head height.

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-May-22, 07:49 PM
A couple of frustrating days here. First, last year a lost a pin that keeps on of tires on the tiller so I replaced it with a bolt and nut, lost two sets in the last couple of days. I started putting paper down between the rows to keep the weeds down, put a little dirt on top of them to keep the wind from blowing them but did not put enough dirt went out an hour ago and the sheets were scattered all over the garden and into the field.

BigDon
2010-May-22, 07:57 PM
Sounds a little more than annoying there Dave

chrissy
2010-May-22, 09:18 PM
I am worried about my poor cordyline, when I returned from Denmark at the end of March, the fronds were looking brown or paled in colour, I have had it for almost 6 years and it has passed the winters here without a hitch, but I think the bad weather we have suffered this year might have given it a shock to the system, I have cut a great many fronds of it already and now it is looking a sorry state, I am just wondering if it will recover or will I have to cut it down because it is dying? :( The centre fronds are also brown but I don't want to cut the off in case there are some healthy fronds lurking inside. Should I wait and see?

Sorry I have just taken the pictures tonight.

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-May-23, 03:02 AM
Sounds a little more than annoying there Dave
Some days I feel like Brian Dunning.http://skeptoid.com/episodes/4150

Fazor
2010-May-23, 05:23 AM
we got our vegetable garden put in today and put up the fence around it, and also put the flowers in the side-beds (along the house) and multched. I'm more proud of it all than I probably should be. Still have a ton of stuff to do tomorrow, but I'd rather not think about that right now.

Fazor
2010-May-25, 05:51 PM
we got our vegetable garden put in today and put up the fence around it, and also put the flowers in the side-beds (along the house) and multched. I'm more proud of it all than I probably should be. Still have a ton of stuff to do tomorrow, but I'd rather not think about that right now.

We finished planting the flowers in the side beds last night. What? I already did that once? Our mentally challenged dogs dug them up the first night. Stupid dogs. So we re-planted the ones that needed replanted, and sprayed with stuff that's supposed to deter them from getting into the beds, but I doubt it'll work. I also got the bed back by where we park put in, and started a handful of various plants in indoor feeders until they sprout and get big enough to transplant out to the gardens.

Tonight, I get to start on the front yard. It's kinda scary because we haven't touched those flowerbeds in years. Lots of big plants that I have no idea what they are. Lots of big bugs in there too. *shudder*

RalofTyr
2010-May-26, 03:07 AM
I'd recommend growing vine snap green beans. I've got about four plants and they provide me with one serving of green beans per day.

I'm also pulling about a handful of cherry tomatoes per day was well from my 20 or so plants.

Fazor
2010-May-26, 01:31 PM
I'd recommend growing vine snap green beans. I've got about four plants and they provide me with one serving of green beans per day.

I'm also pulling about a handful of cherry tomatoes per day was well from my 20 or so plants.

Yep, we've got some of the beans germinating right now. No cherry tomatoes this year, but we've grown 'em in years past and they've always done well. Also have a couple varieties of lettuce and some bell peppers. I'm (attempting) to grow some jalapeno and cayenne peppers, but they're going in planters rather than in the garden. Six or seven different herbs are (theoretically) germinating in pots in a planter on our deck too. Curious to see of all the stuff we're planting, what will grow and what won't.

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-May-28, 06:24 PM
Went to the nursery again to pick up some strawberry plants and other things. They were actually sold out on the strawberries so were their suppliers.

Done tilling for planting. Some plants nearly died because hot temperatures and not enough rain. Yes I did hand water them but still not enough for them. Some beans, peas and potatoes are coming up.

Fazor
2010-May-28, 06:32 PM
Done tilling for planting. Some plants nearly died because hot temperatures and not enough rain. Yes I did hand water them but still not enough for them. Some beans, peas and potatoes are coming up.
Cool! Our tomato plants are getting pretty tall; we'll need to put in the cages for them to grow around this weekend. Out of the seven various herb pots, the basil and the thyme were sprouting like weeds as of yesterday. We started the sprouts of other things inside; they're currently in the kitchen window. Two varieties of lettuce are growing pretty fast, the bell peppers are sprouted, and the green beans are sprouted, I have some pretty good okra sprouts too. My jalepeno and cayenne haven't sprouted yet, but IIRC, they have a slightly longer germination period. Exciting! I hoping to get to use the cayenne and the okra to make home-made spicy pickled okra; one of my favorite foods.

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-May-28, 06:52 PM
Just took a walk out in the garden and the lettuce, spinach and swiss chard are coming up. Got tomatoes, basil, thyme an dill plants and some cucumber, squash and pumpkin seeds which are probably going into the garden this weekend, I forgot to get more fertilizer last trip. Also got some marigolds which help keep away the deer.

RalofTyr
2010-May-28, 09:59 PM
Yep, we've got some of the beans germinating right now. No cherry tomatoes this year, but we've grown 'em in years past and they've always done well. Also have a couple varieties of lettuce and some bell peppers. I'm (attempting) to grow some jalapeno and cayenne peppers, but they're going in planters rather than in the garden. Six or seven different herbs are (theoretically) germinating in pots in a planter on our deck too. Curious to see of all the stuff we're planting, what will grow and what won't.

My peppers are taking forever and a day to grow.

I tried some Serranos, but they haven't come up at all. I save some of the seeds when I buy them at the store.

jokergirl
2010-May-29, 08:23 AM
This year my windowsill has two types of cherry tomatoes - one are the tried and true Tiny Tim, and they just get better every year. They are already growing tomatoes now.
I'm also trying small eggplants - very, very curious about those. They have flowerbuds but they're not open yet. Anybody who could give me a hint about eggplant pollination? I hope it's not like zucchini...

Chiles and peppers are doing fine, but as for everyone else - slow.

;)

mahesh
2010-May-29, 09:44 AM
Most of the weeds I have are grasses milkweed and horseradish. The horseradish pops up everywhere. I think it is similar to goutweed in the method it spreads. It was started by grandfather years ago. He liked chopped up and put into chopped up pickled beets in kind of a relish. Now I am the only one that likes spicy food so it does not get used at all.
Aaw...that's a real shame. Horseradish! I used to hunting for it, inner city areas, to make my sauce from scratch.

Wouldn't you consider making your own brand a la Paul Newman?
Seems a waste not to use it. May be you could...oh well...

mahesh
2010-May-29, 09:54 AM
...I'm also trying small eggplants - very, very curious about those. They have flowerbuds but they're not open yet. Anybody who could give me a hint about eggplant pollination? I hope it's not like zucchini...

Chiles and peppers are doing fine, but as for everyone else - slow.

;)
You mean aubergines! Oh the Lovely, Delicious, Most Delicate, Beautifully Coloured, Gorgeously Edible Vegetable! Yuuuuuuum!

jg, for your files for future use:
http://apps.rhs.org.uk/advicesearch/AtoZ.aspx

but here's http://www.nhm.ac.uk/nature-online/species-of-the-day/scientific-advances/industry/solanum-melongena/behaviour/index.html

you might end up using q-tips and / or a mascara brush to help it along, in absence of natural agents in inner cities.

when's dinner?

RalofTyr
2010-May-30, 09:10 PM
I've got a heavy clay soil. I'm thinking of digging a small hole in between each corn plant to catch water. When I water, I suspect the water is just running over the rows instead of soaking in.

jokergirl
2010-May-31, 07:54 AM
You mean aubergines! Oh the Lovely, Delicious, Most Delicate, Beautifully Coloured, Gorgeously Edible Vegetable! Yuuuuuuum!

jg, for your files for future use:
http://apps.rhs.org.uk/advicesearch/AtoZ.aspx

but here's http://www.nhm.ac.uk/nature-online/species-of-the-day/scientific-advances/industry/solanum-melongena/behaviour/index.html

you might end up using q-tips and / or a mascara brush to help it along, in absence of natural agents in inner cities.

when's dinner?

Three flowers opened yesterday! I've been brushing them the same way I have been successful with tomatoes already, using my fingers or a small paintbrush.
Another flower opened today, and there are lots of buds on all of the plants. Yay!

I can't wait... yum.

;)

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Jun-01, 03:01 AM
Everything in but the cukes, can't find the seeds. The weather forecast is for rain for 5 out of the next 7 days. All I have to say is let it rain.

mike alexander
2010-Jun-01, 06:35 AM
I could use just a bit less rain, but the weather pattern is slowly moving towards summer.

Second-year blueberries look like they'll be ready for picking in 2-3 weeks. Not a lot yet, but the plants are doing nicely and I expect a good payoff next year.

BigDon
2010-Jun-02, 04:58 PM
I went and checked my parent's yard yesterday. One of the grapes has two big red leaves finally.

I have the flowers looking good, but now the lawn needs more attention. So much rain I have a rust problem with my grass! Though the roses are fine.

RalofTyr
2010-Jun-03, 03:42 AM
I'm pulling a handful of cherry tomatoes and green beans every other day.

My peppers are coming up and growing very slowly...my beats and melons aren't doing a thing.

Since I've been watering more frequently, my corn and tomatoes are booming. Some of them are almost as tall as me!!!

The girls at work love it when I give them plants to go as I have beans and cherry tomatoes growing as weeds.

slang
2010-Jun-04, 07:50 PM
When should chili peppers be picked? As soon as they've turned fully red? (Got a plant with peppers in several stages of growth)

ETA: Strawberries doing great, also got a few broccoli and cauliflower plants that are doing great. Moved a cherry tomato plant we bought a few years ago from its pot into the ground. It never gave much fruit, maybe it will now.

geonuc
2010-Jun-06, 10:09 AM
I've been growing chiles for over twenty years and I like to pick them when they're fully red. But you can pick them earlier.

Fazor
2010-Jun-07, 04:05 PM
Here's a quick question for all you pepper-growers out there: my jalapeno and cayenne pepper sprouts are about at that size to be moved from the indoor starter setup to their outdoor location. I was going to grow the pepper plants in decorative planters rather than put them in the ground. I'm just curious as to how big the planters should be to accommodate the roots. I have 8 plants; four of each. Was hoping to do two plants per planter.

BigDon
2010-Jun-07, 07:50 PM
Go at least five gallons. We have rocotos in five gallon containers as that's as big as pratical for moving them around on furniture dollies when it gets cold.

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Jun-07, 07:57 PM
Today went out into the garden and saw something ate a couple of head lettuce plants I suspect deer. I haven't put the marigolds near there yet because it has raining a lot lately and I was focused on another part of the garden.

BigDon
2010-Jun-07, 07:59 PM
I suspect a deer can ruin a lettuce head pretty quickly.

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Jun-07, 10:42 PM
It wasn't deer it was slugs. I caught the little buggers in the act of eating a couple more head lettuce plants. I sprinkled some some salt on the ones on the plant and left a cup with just a little ice tea in the bottom. (I don't have any beer.)

slang
2010-Jun-07, 11:46 PM
In our backyard we have a shrub (actually 2 close together) of Red currant (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redcurrant). It does well and gave us a lot of berries last year. Considering the amount of berries already starting to grow, this year should be good too. But.. it suffers from small green caterpillars (a few mm in size, comparable to a grain of rice). From earlier experience I know I have to act quickly or the entire shrub will be without leaves. [...]

12952

After several searches on websites trying to find out what kind of caterpillar (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caterpillar) this is, I found out that it isn't... I learned that true caterpillars have three pairs of "real" legs in the front, and up to four pairs of "prolegs (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proleg)" under the belly, and usually a pair of "pusher" legs on the last segment. My critters have 6 or 7 pairs of prolegs, which means they aren't caterpillars after all. They start out as translucent green, but as they get big they get a black interior. I put a few of them in a jar, with a nice, regularly renewed bunch of fresh leafs, and they (somehow) turned into black flying insects. I didn't see it happen, I didn't see a cocoon or anything, the insects just showed up. I didn't do anything to destroy them this year, and they ate every leaf of the shrub. In the end they would be a dozen of creatures eating a single leaf. (bad quality, attempt to image one in the glass jar: )

13108

(Btw, when the description on the label of bought tiny broccoli or cauli flower say that they need a certain amount of surface... they're not kidding. These babies get big!)

BigDon
2010-Jun-07, 11:58 PM
Hose doesn't work? Most catepillar type creatures fair poorly on the ground.

slang
2010-Jun-08, 07:00 AM
No, I had not thought of that. They require a bit of force to get them loose from the leaves, and I suspect that would get rid of the berries too, won't it? So far the only thing that has ever helped was a chemical solution, don't remember which. But I'll keep this in mind for when the shrub grows leaves again. Nasty critters had a free ride this year, mostly to satisfy my curiosity.. but now that satisfaction is here, they better beware!

BigDon
2010-Jun-08, 08:32 AM
Go with BT (Bacillus thuringiensis) then.

You didn't even try a spray bottle of mildly soapy water?

slang
2010-Jun-08, 09:43 AM
Go with BT (Bacillus thuringiensis) then.

You didn't even try a spray bottle of mildly soapy water?

Not this time, although I received a suggestion for this. It's strange... first I really wanted to prevent the shrub going leafless as it has done before, but then I got fascinated by what these fellas were doing, and ended up just observing. Never caught any in the act of transformation though, and not for lack of trying.

Perhaps I should add that in the first 40 years or so of my life I was never interested in what really went on in my backyard, never really tried growing anything, barely paid attention to it. Just mowing the grass occasionally and raking weeds once or twice. The shrub will survive this.. it's probably got more to fear from my attempts at trimming it. :)

jokergirl
2010-Jun-08, 09:46 AM
http://joker.mirar.org/bento/flower2010.jpg

Lovely!

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Jun-14, 11:54 AM
The ice tea didn't work so I went got a few beers from the liquor store, and it works great. I divide one beer for six traps and they all had at least one slug in them a couple about a dozen.

HenrikOlsen
2010-Jun-14, 12:19 PM
Beer's excellent for attracting slugs.
If you leave the slug after it died, know that dead slug is an even better attractant, they come from near and far to feast on the dead ones.

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Jun-14, 12:25 PM
Beer's excellent for attracting slugs.
If you leave the slug after it died, know that dead slug is an even better attractant, they come from near and far to feast on the dead ones.

[Monty burns] excellent[/Monty burns]

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Jun-14, 12:34 PM
Also had other pests in the garden, ants. The get rid of them I poured some gas on the colony and lighted it with a match. Had to replace some lettuce was eaten by the slugs and ants.

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Jun-18, 07:48 PM
No something is eating the soldier beans but leaving the other beans alone.

Fazor
2010-Jun-18, 08:24 PM
No something is eating the soldier beans but leaving the other beans alone.
Obviously, now you have a colony of army ants.

HenrikOlsen
2010-Jun-20, 10:51 PM
The apple trees I grafted this year are doing fine.

Here's a picture of two of them.
13321

RalofTyr
2010-Jun-22, 05:29 AM
I find beer isn't that effective. I might get one or two a night, but that's it. It's more effective against snails just to walk out in your garden at nigh; you're bound to step on a few.

The neighbor's dogs got through the fence and crapped in my backyard. I don't know the neighbors feed them, but there were tons of flies; more flies then I had ever seen on my dogs' duty. The flies didn't leave and swarmed in my garden (the ground's wet). I hope the flies leave; I spare the spiders because their job is to eat the bugs coming to eat my veggies and flies, do not eat my veggies and don't need to be spider food.

My corn is flowering; my peppers, beets and melons are failing to grow at a good pace; I guess they don't like my heavy clay soil. Beans, tomatoes and corn love it.

slang
2010-Jun-23, 09:26 PM
My pepper plant (http://www.pickandjoy.com/en/pick-a-hot-pep.html) suddenly started to wilt. Not for lack of water. I think I may have added too much fertilizer. Picked what peppers were on it, albeit green, and now hoping it will start growing again. One pepper looked pretty bad, so I opened it up and got the seeds from it. Will try to see if I can make something grow from those.

Torsten
2010-Jun-24, 04:08 PM
The apple trees I grafted this year are doing fine.

Aha, you found a solution to the frozen soil problem.

BigDon
2010-Jun-24, 04:42 PM
Aha, you found a solution to the frozen soil problem.

I was thinking the same thing. :)

I'm sad to say that due to being a bit under the weather I couldn't get to my parent's house often enough and four of the grapes got a bit dessicated in the steady 18mph wind that started two weeks ago. I dispair as to their recovery. The least harmed is starting to grow fast though.

I'll try to get pictures of individual flowers. I have a tree peony that puts out huge complex pink flowers the size of dinner plates. I can never predict when it's going to bloom though and thats after twenty years of tending it. It just does it when it wants too.

One of the new cactus bloomed three days ago but I wasn't up to taking it's picture then. And the flowers are very short lived, two days at most. The flower was incredibly crimson. Someone will cry photoshop!, I'm sure. It's got three more buds, and I'm feeling better so be prepared!

HenrikOlsen
2010-Jun-24, 05:57 PM
Aha, you found a solution to the frozen soil problem.
I had them heeled in in a couple of peat filled bread trays on my balcony for about three weeks until I could get them in the ground.

flynjack1
2010-Jun-28, 08:20 PM
Zuccini is doing great, jalepenos fair, basil is blooming, cucumbers are producing, but what gives with my tomatos? Lots of blooms but very little fruit. I was wondering if my watering by sprinkler rather than drip was causing a problem? Any suggestions?

BigDon
2010-Jun-29, 10:08 PM
As tomato growing is a minor religeon around here, I'll ask around Jack. Managed to avoid it myself and went into flower growing. I have to say my parent's yard is looking nice, btw.)

Fazor
2010-Jun-30, 02:18 AM
Gardening? I must admit I've been thoroughly disinterested in my garden for the past couple of weeks. Ninty-plus-ninty will do that to you (Ninty+ degrees (F) with 90 or better relative humidity). Beyond watering my herbs in the morning, I have done very little beyond the requisite yard upkeep. I did pull out about five yard-bags (ya know, those big brown paper bags for yard . . . stuff) worth of weeds and junk from our years-of-neglected front garden and under the pine tree. And trimmed the front hedges back. I'd like to tear them out, but not 'til I can afford to build a new porch on the front of the house (so, never).

The tomatos and lettuce and ocra and beans all look like they're doing great; but I haven't gotten in to get a close look. I need to weed. And as many slugs as our yard has, I'd be surprised if they havent launched a full-on assault on the plants. Big suckers; but they'll get what's coming to them. Slugs should know better than to go anywhere near a fisherman's house.

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Jun-30, 02:45 AM
After two days of rain, I got an email from a seed company advertising products to help you water the garden.

RalofTyr
2010-Jun-30, 03:38 AM
I haven't seen rain since late April.

My corn is eight-feet tall. Tomatoes are six-feet tall.

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Jul-15, 08:46 PM
An update.
Already some of the Chard more ready to pick tomorrow, also ate all the spinach and some of the lettuce. The peas a loaded and almost ready to pick. I planted beans to times, the first bunch are setting the pods and have more flowers setting. The wild raspberries a loaded and the other a day a neighbor with a few too many cultivated raspberries to pick asked me over to pick what I could. i took over a couple of extra heads of broccoli. The tomatoes are setting fruit and the pumpkins are just about to flower, the squash is somewhat behind because the slugs got the first bunch I planted. Ok, the garden is needing a severe deweeding, the best time is in the morning but I can't get out there in time and I try in the evening but that is when the nieces are home and want to go outdoors and someone has to keep an eye on them.

Fazor
2010-Jul-15, 08:58 PM
Our garden could use a de-weeding too but a combination of never getting around to setting proper tomato cages as well as planting things that got much bigger than I expected too close, the veggies have pretty much squashed out the weeds. When I picked the first batch of okra last night, there weren't as many weeds as I'd expected there to be.

There's a bunch of green-beans to pick too, but I promised those to my office manager since I don't have a particular need for them at the moment.

HenrikOlsen
2010-Jul-15, 09:17 PM
The red currants were ready to be harvested, though it looks like something got to them, one branch was completely denuded of leaves.
I found another "tent" on the apple tree from the Apple Ermine Moth larvae, but I think it was from the same batch as the other two, which got taken care of last time.
Four more bags of weeds are ready to be driven to the communal compost.

We had major thunder and rain Monday night (42,500 lightning strikes registered for Denmark in 24 hours), and a minor shower today, so I considered it safe to go to work with the propane burner on the weeded areas. I haven't been able to do that before now because we just had 3 weeks of sun and the fire risk was too high.

A question for the knowledgeable: Why does this happen to my tomatoes?
13441

geonuc
2010-Jul-16, 10:36 AM
A question for the knowledgeable: Why does this happen to my tomatoes?
13441



I'd be interested to know, as well. It's happening to my tomatoes, too.

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Aug-02, 11:03 PM
Don't know about the tomatoes the only rule I know about tomatoes is don't touch when they are wet.
The garden is producing fine, next if I have the money is to get someone to plow(plough) under the part the field where I going to put the garden.

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Aug-03, 03:36 AM
I should of taking my camera with me sometimes. The other day while picking berries I came across a couple of Monarch butterflies making new butterflies, they flew off together.

Githyanki
2010-Aug-03, 08:28 PM
My corn is over-mature and too chewy. I'm going to remove the leaves from the corn stalks and tie the stalks to a stake in the ground; then I'm going to plant beans and use the corn stalks and bean poles.

http://i33.tinypic.com/2yz0ffd.jpg

geonuc
2010-Aug-06, 08:07 AM
A question for the knowledgeable: Why does this happen to my tomatoes?
13441

Blossom end rot, caused by a lack of calcium or drought stress. As I indicated above, it happened to my plants as well.

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Aug-15, 09:08 PM
Most of my corn only grew to about 5 feet and some only about 2 feet, don't know if I get any corn there are about 30 ears forming out there. Got a few tomatoes and cherry tomatoes already, the first on lasted about ten minutes off the vine. Bite it put some salt in it and ate the rest. Yesterday picked about half a shopping bag of bush beans and half a dozen brussels sprouts.

HenrikOlsen
2010-Aug-17, 05:40 PM
This was waiting for me in the greenhouse when I came home from England.
13577

OK, slight exaggeration, the ones to the left with white stuff on them were in the freezer from before I left and it's ice.

Time to make tomato sauce for the winter.

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Aug-17, 07:46 PM
I probably only get a couple dozen tomatoes this year but after years of not having them right out of the garden it is great.

HenrikOlsen
2010-Aug-17, 08:02 PM
1˝ hours of simmering and some manual work later, 2/3rds of them(what fit in the pan) has been separated into two parts,
13578 that which after 1˝ hours of simmering can pass through the sieve and that which can't even after lots of encouragement.

Now to boil the last third in a smaller pan (it was needed during the separation so the boiling couldn't be done in parallel), while the large one reduces over slow heat, with the intent to similarly separate the small portion and combine the two portions to one, then reduce it further before putting it in jars.

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Aug-17, 09:46 PM
Henrick, stop rubbing the salt in.

Bigdon these are my grapes, I've got to build something to bring them down closer to the ground.
http://www.bautforum.com/album.php?albumid=200&attachmentid=13579

Githyanki
2010-Aug-19, 09:23 PM
I probably only get a couple dozen tomatoes this year but after years of not having them right out of the garden it is great.

That's why I like tomatoes; I can go out anytime and grab fresh ones for sandwiches and burgers.

HenrikOlsen
2010-Aug-25, 05:35 PM
More loot from the garden.
13609
The apples are a bit premature, dropped because of heavy winds.
The potatoes are the loot from a single plant, the green ones were pushed up from below because there was basically nothing but potato under them. I'll sort those out and save then for next year.
The carrot was from a seed that didn't grow last year.

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Aug-25, 06:21 PM
One of the reasons I want to plow(plough) the garden under next year is to allow the potatoes to go deeper. The soil is had and filled with grass roots.

HenrikOlsen
2010-Oct-01, 06:34 PM
have a single vine, currently about to enter its third year of training where it's planted.
I don't expect much from it production wise, as it was picked as an impulse buy at the nursery during a shopping spree, so I'm basically playing around trying to learn how to train one before I start laying out money for a more well researched selection.

I selected that specific system of training because a lack of space where it's growing meant I require tall narrow growth and don't have space for multiple trunks and/or long side canes. Being tall also reduces the risk of frost damage which definitely was a bonus with this winter.
So far the permanent structure has been established and this year the exercise will be about establishing 2-3 spur systems on each horizontal branch. Being one year old, they really want to produce grapes this year but as I really want side growth to establish things for next year, I don't intend to allow them to:naughty:
I got weak and went for trying to get grapes anyway and picked 5 pounds of grapes from it yesterday.
1374413743

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Oct-01, 06:47 PM
The growing season is pretty much over here. There are still brussels sprouts and leeks and the ground. The grapes are out of reach. For them I have an idea of using an old antenna tower and some tubing from old tents for cross supports but just have to find a way of connecting them together. It is one those projects I should of done this year.

HenrikOlsen
2010-Oct-01, 07:14 PM
Same here, I dug up the last potatoes and picked the last apples, cleared out the greenhouse of old tomato plants, cursed the lawnmower which wouldn't start as well as my lack of motivation for the garden this year which caused me to miss when the raspberries were ready to pick, I had to trash several pounds of them as overripe.:(

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Oct-01, 07:25 PM
Most people in the area did well in their gardens this year. Mine could of done better some it came from not planting at the right time because I had to make I had funds for other things, some of it is not getting on weeding when I should have. Plus there was the fight with the slugs that meant I had replant some things over and also there was bit of a drought in the last week of July until the end of August. Lessons I have learned, somethings take too long to plant them from seed so us plants next year plus slugs can't do that much damage to them if they are grown a fair bit. Ashes work well for chard as well spinach and beets. Next year I will probably use more chemical fertilizer in the garden, manure is fine for most things but still need and extra kick. Should try to get the part of the field I am using plowed it would probably make things a lot easier in the future.

Also I did plant a crab apple and a couple of cedar trees this year. Mom picked them up a retailer that has plants for sale for a few weeks and wanted to get rid them so the price was reduced. Hopefully they will live to next year.

HenrikOlsen
2010-Oct-01, 09:25 PM
13751 quick update on the grapes.
This is the result obtained by replacing the traditional feet of a burly french peasant with squishing them with my hands and picking the stalks out individually.
I'm going to see if it'll start fermenting on its own before buying yeast. It'll feel more like the result of my own work if I don't have to buy any ingredients at all.:)

The Backroad Astronomer
2011-Mar-08, 06:44 PM
The snow is melting and time to think about the garden again. Save some of the soldier beans from last year. Got a lot of choke cherry trees to cut down but still alot of snow around them. The area the occupy needs to cleaned up.

HenrikOlsen
2011-Mar-08, 07:15 PM
I was actually thinking of revisiting this thread, but revisiting the garden made me end up in the random rants thread instead.

Been starting to plan which apple scions to buy this time, I don't quite have enough yet, with only 14 succeeding last spring.

The Backroad Astronomer
2011-Mar-11, 07:58 PM
I saw that rant and it sucks it happened to you.

The Backroad Astronomer
2011-Mar-21, 03:36 PM
Started to cut down some the choke cherries and other trees an the area that need to be cleared. We have some tiger lilies that have been for years. Some the chives probably will be coming up, the only unfortunate thing is they are planted in the lawn so it could be hard to tell the difference betwwen chives and grass.

HenrikOlsen
2011-Mar-30, 01:00 PM
Today I finally got my gardening season started. Started out by sowing 24 mini pots of tomatoes, squash and annual spices, plus setting new seed potatoes to sprout. I have a batch from last year as well, which will get planted first, since they're already more sprouts that potatoes.

BigDon
2011-Mar-31, 06:50 PM
I would have started a week ago but I'm sidelined with another round of renal colic. More kidney stones it seems. I hate kidney stones.

But I did inspect today and the yard is positively lush and ready to be worked.

The Backroad Astronomer
2011-Apr-01, 03:50 PM
Didn't get much done this week. One of the nieces was home sick for three days, just a rash but the school didn't want it spreading. Got some of the stuff a cut down cleaned up, getting way to many piles of brush piling up.

Fazor
2011-Apr-13, 06:10 PM
It's that time of the year again, isn't it? We got our side-flowerbeds cleared, and the vegetable garden cleared last weekend. I also got to it soon enough to be able to get to the maple tree that grows right up through the middle of our lilac bush, and used my hand-axe to chop the heck out of the stump after sawing down the new growth.

I need to clean up the front garden (and *maybe* get around to taking down those Christmas lights . . . . ) And I need to take the lattice down around my deck and clear out the stuff that grows through it, cover the ground to prevent (or, at least slow) new growth this year. I need more lattice, since we bought the house there are spaces by the stairs and around in back that were left open, and my dogs run under there. I want to keep them out since it's always such a mud-pit after it rains. Then the whole thing needs repainted/sealed.

Too much to do; but at least it's nice outside.

The Backroad Astronomer
2011-Apr-14, 02:56 PM
I was down with a cold last week so not much got done. Still doing a lot of pruning and clearing out a certain area. Part of the area that I used for the garden last year is now covered with brush and a lot more to go. Underneath is a lot of junk metal that my grandfather left there maybe a can sell it for garden money. Also in this area is an old blacksmiths shop that needs to be torn down. The other day I found the old blower for the furnance, it is all seized up but still looks cool.

Fazor
2011-Apr-14, 05:31 PM
Sounds like you have your hands full! I should have done some stuff last night, but I too am fighting a cold and used that as my excuse to work on some programming indoors instead.

Tonight, at the very least, I'll have to break down this small tree I chopped down last weekend, since it's now laying by our back gate with it's branches protruding just into the doorway path at both eye-level and shin-level. I've made it almost the week without poking or tripping myself on it, but I probably shouldn't continue to press my luck.

Jim
2011-Apr-15, 03:36 PM
I doubt we'll do much in the way of veggie garden stuff, although I did manage to nurse the strawberry pot through the winter and the plants are now putting on berries.

A friend was mentioning yesterday that his wife wanted to put in two raised beds for planting. He bought all the materials... cedar fence boards, framing posts, metal edging brackets, nails... it cost him about $33 for each 4x4 planter. He spent several hours cutting the boards and posts to size and putting all the pieces together. Then he noticed Home depot had 4x4 planters ready for easy assembly for $34 each.

Fazor
2011-Apr-15, 03:47 PM
A friend was mentioning yesterday that his wife wanted to put in two raised beds for planting. He bought all the materials... cedar fence boards, framing posts, metal edging brackets, nails... it cost him about $33 for each 4x4 planter. He spent several hours cutting the boards and posts to size and putting all the pieces together. Then he noticed Home depot had 4x4 planters ready for easy assembly for $34 each.

Ha! Well, I, for one, would at least feel more manly and accomplished with self-built ones. I'd like some raised beds, but didn't have the time or money last year and don't really plan on them for this year either. As far as veggies go, we tried too much for our tiny space last year and it was just an overgrown mess (thought it at least yielded some vegg. Okra plants are much bigger than I thought they would be! And our tomatoes took over the whole place because I was too lazy to prune them back. Got some green beans too, but our lettuce and . . . I forget the other thing we tried to plant, never became usable. They grew, but they were overtaken by the other colossal plants.

This year I think we're sticking to small plants. Maybe some bean vines. No tomatoes. No okra!

HenrikOlsen
2011-Apr-15, 06:01 PM
Tomatoes can be nasty, without pruning and support they'll revert to their original growth pattern and flatten down to all sides, then just put down roots wherever they touch ground and keep going.

Fazor
2011-Apr-15, 06:07 PM
Tomatoes can be nasty, without pruning and support they'll revert to their original growth pattern and flatten down to all sides, then just put down roots wherever they touch ground and keep going.

That's exactly what they did. We *did* have support, but without the pruning (and due to them being the "big boy" tomatoes, which are extra large), they were still too huge and heavy, and toppled their support and strangled out all but the okra and a few lucky vines of beans.

I'm thinking just a handful of small, bushy veggies this year. Maybe a few heads of lettuce and/or cabbage. Maybe some hot peppers. Haven't made up my mind yet; still have almost a month before they need planted anyway.

Jim
2011-Apr-15, 06:34 PM
I normally plant three tomato plants in pots on the patio, one regular, one cherry, one whatever-looks-good. This year the BW has taken over. She wants to plant some in a raised planter (sound familiar?) with some herbs.

Oh, meant to add...

We had a small veggie garden while we were living in Baton Rouge and planted - among other things - some okra. It did really, really well. Tall and prolific.

The Backroad Astronomer
2011-Apr-24, 02:56 PM
Tried to burn som brush Thursday but when I tried it rained, snowed, hailed and even the wind blew it out so after a couple of hours I just gave up. next best day is actually tomorrow so I might try again. The chives are coming also the crab apple tree I planted last year looks like it doing well also.

The Backroad Astronomer
2011-May-09, 01:57 PM
Got the tiller going friday, started up on the first pull. Just tilled about half the garden, found some old pea seeds and some dill seeds from some dill I grew last summer, maybe get some strawberries. I have already been to the nursery twice without getting something.

Fazor
2011-May-09, 03:09 PM
Got the tiller going friday, started up on the first pull. Just tilled about half the garden, found some old pea seeds and some dill seeds from some dill I grew last summer, maybe get some strawberries. I have already been to the nursery twice without getting something.

You're welcome to haul that thing on down here if you want to do some more tilling when you finish with your place. I have a couple spots that could use it! With all the going's on with Tara's grandmother; but I did end up with yesterday afternoon free. Here's the only-something-I-could-be-proud-about result:
14961

The edging is something I've had hiding out in my shed for the last two years; we had it along the side of the house at one point, but it was getting torn up from the dogs. I considered repainting it with left over deck stain I have, but thought the wear added character so I just replaced a few missing parts and went with it.

That garden has been nothing but a bed of tall weeds since we bought the house six years ago. At one point we pulled everything we could and planted a few flowers, but they were quickly overcome by the weeds again. I had cut it all down at the end of the year last year, and the flowers came back and look healthy, but so did a bunch of ground-covering vine plants. I know I'll be battling them all year, but it's nice to finally have the bed mulched.

Tonight I start on the back yard!

HenrikOlsen
2011-May-09, 03:27 PM
Thursday I got the lawn mowed for the first time, the tomatoes are in the greenhouse, growing fast.
I got all the small apple trees pruned, including the ones I grafted last spring, The various fruit bushes are doing well, though I should have a look at the ones with frost damage and get them pruned.
The raspberries are doing well, both the line of spring bearing ones and the line of autumn bearing ones, though they're obviously at different stages in their growth and the spring bearing ones haven't entirely settled yet.
The peonies (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php/101543-A-general-gardening-thread?p=1724671#post1724671) are shooting again, seems like they didn't get the hint last year when I mowed them together with the rest of the lawn.

HenrikOlsen
2011-May-09, 03:29 PM
... Here's the only-something-I-could-be-proud-about result:
14961 ...
Apart from not having the same taste in edging styles, I would be proud of that result too.

The Backroad Astronomer
2011-May-09, 04:57 PM
The only raspberries I have are wild ones and the grow pretty much everywhere and the berries are not that big. Also this spring I am clearing some areas of junk and the raspberries love growing in the stuff so a lot of wild raspberries will be pruned back a lot. While clearine some old tires away I found a second patch of Rhubarb, I kind of knew where it was but things cover it up or grow high above it. Everywhere where my grandfather lived he plated the stuff. I do want to get some cultivated ones plus some cultivated blueberries but they are out of my very limited budget at the time.

Fazor
2011-May-10, 12:11 AM
Apart from not having the same taste in edging styles, I would be proud of that result too.

Tara's not big on it either, but with our plain-box white house, I like the red cedar as accents. It was a lot sharper when we first got it and it was still vibrant, as our back deck had just been painted and was a matching color. I really like the clay-red accent to the white home.

Tara's vote doesn't count anymore though, so I brought them back out of hibernation. We've lived here for six years and I can count the number of times she's done any yard work on one hand. :-P

Inclusa
2011-May-10, 06:44 AM
Fresh picked raspberries are nothing like the ones at the supermarket; they are so aromatic and tasty (pick them when they are deep red and eat them QUICK; they rot so readily).
I recommend not to do asparagus in a home garden; weeding is verydifficult, and the harvest is quite poor.

jokergirl
2011-May-10, 08:02 AM
Still doing windowsill gardening myself.

This year's models:

Tiny Tim cherry tomatoes (they're perfect for the windowsill - low-growing, bushy, don't need pruning and give LOTS of fruit),
nasturtiums,
http://joker.mirar.org/P?loc=gardening/DSC09410.JPG&get=s
lots of herbs,
http://joker.mirar.org/P?loc=gardening/DSC09417.JPG&get=s
and radishes and carrots in a deep planter :D
http://joker.mirar.org/P?loc=gardening/DSC09423.JPG&get=s

HenrikOlsen
2011-May-10, 02:19 PM
Tiny Tim's one I tried in the greenhouse too. I'll recommend that for a windowsill too.

The Backroad Astronomer
2011-May-10, 03:41 PM
Fresh picked raspberries are nothing like the ones at the supermarket; they are so aromatic and tasty (pick them when they are deep red and eat them QUICK; they rot so readily).
I recommend not to do asparagus in a home garden; weeding is verydifficult, and the harvest is quite poor.

Tomatoes are another thing that taste a lot better right out of garden vs in the store, actually pretty much everything.
We do have asparagus kind of been grandfathered in like a lot things in the garden, but we just let it go to a fern. Gardening can be a lot like astronomy it requires patience, you are often are continuing someone eles work, and you are always learning new things.

Fazor
2011-May-10, 04:06 PM
We're trying to decide what to plant in our veggie garden this year. It's that time where we really need to get a move on. Probably some tomatos but not the gigantic variety we did last year. That was a debacle. We have limited space (probably a 10 x 6 ft plot) so we aren't planting a whole lot, but there will be room for maybe one or two more small-plant veggies. Maybe a few vines of beans. I don't know. I'm feeling very un-inspired this year.

HenrikOlsen
2011-May-10, 05:05 PM
You could try for the traditional, and do the three sisters (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_Sisters_(agriculture)).

Fazor
2011-May-10, 06:11 PM
You could try for the traditional, and do the three sisters (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_Sisters_(agriculture)).

Not a great spot for the corn, but Tara's family are farmers and they have a few-hundred acres worth of corn, so we're not lacking in that department. Maybe the squash, though.

The Backroad Astronomer
2011-May-10, 06:26 PM
Some of my cousins operate a strawberry u-pick about 2km from here yet I still plan on having stawberries in the garden.

Inclusa
2011-May-11, 06:12 AM
Who have planted strawbini? Can anyone tell something about it?

The Backroad Astronomer
2011-May-13, 03:26 PM
Never even heard of it before and had to look it up. If it is like a strawberry plant then it like acidic soil if not it will like a more neutral soil ph, sorry that is all I can think of.

The Backroad Astronomer
2011-May-13, 03:28 PM
Since I am here I went to the nursery to pick up some strawberry plants, they were sold out. They said they will be sourcing some more but I just got a raspberry plant instead.

HenrikOlsen
2011-May-13, 03:39 PM
Since I am here I went to the nursery to pick up some strawberry plants, they were sold out. They said they will be sourcing some more but I just got a raspberry plant instead.
Remember to check if it's a summer- or double/ever-bearing variety, this influences how they should be cut, with the summer bearing varieties you don't get raspberries on first-year canes, rather you get them around mid-summer on second-year canes, which can then be cut off at the surface.
Double/ever-bearing varieties will give a crop in the autumn on first year canes and you then have a choice of either cutting them then or let them stay for a second (smaller) crop the year after.
In both cases, cut them no later than the second year if you want good production and cut right down at the surface. Raspberries shoot from the roots, not from buds on old canes, so keeping a bit standing will only increase the chance of infections.

The Backroad Astronomer
2011-May-13, 03:55 PM
It's a summer bearing variety, over the years I will getting more. We have plenty of wild raspberries but they can be small and unreliable.

I also want to get some cultivate blueberries but you need 2 different varieties for them to produce berries. We have a small patch of wild blueberries, it is in a wooded area, the only way to spread then is fire and won't work there.

HenrikOlsen
2011-May-13, 04:33 PM
..., over the years I will getting more.
Being a raspberry, that's axiomatic. Even without buying any more. :)

Githyanki
2011-May-14, 02:11 AM
What grows good in heavy clay-soil; I've read that beans and potatoes do, so, I've planted a few potatoes at the low spots where the water collects; is there anything else I can plant? I tried some zucchinis, but they didn't come up.

Fazor
2011-May-14, 02:22 AM
My parent's soil is mostly clay, and they can grow corn (they don't, but when we bought the land, it was a corn field so I know it grows), tomatos, zucchini's, squash, and pumpkins. I'm sure more can be grown, but that's what my mom plants and she always ends up with pretty healthy plants. You don't want to plant most of that where there's standing or pooling water, though.

Githyanki
2011-May-30, 03:14 PM
There goes my garden; what few things that grows in my soil gets ravishingly eaten before they have a chance to grow. I've lost all my tomatoes, beans, melons, beets and peppers in the space of a few days. I think I have grasshoppers so I'm going to find some poison for them.

I'm growing replacement plants in large pots at another location. and will transplant when they are about a foot in size and more resistant to whatever's eating them.

The Backroad Astronomer
2011-Jun-13, 05:12 PM
Finally got all the garden in this weekend hopefully there will enough time to let the stuff grow before forst. I got a couple of jobs in May so I was able to get some stuff plus my mother got some as well so my garden is now stuffed with veggies growing the list includes:
4 types of potato (purple, banana, red, and regular)
5 types of tomato
soldier, green and yellow beans
dill (my seeds didn't work so I bought some plants)
cucumber
squash
pumpkins
beets
a couple of different kinds of peppers
peas

A question so someone out there. We have a couple of horse chestnut trees and every summer their leaves dry up and fall off early, does anyone know whatcould be causing this.

just googled and found the answer apperantly they just need more water that time of year and I thought it was a major pest doing it.

Githyanki
2011-Jun-17, 12:09 AM
WHAT'S EATING MY GARDEN!!!

I planted pole-beans, about 60 individuals plants; they were growing good and when they reached about an inch or two high, something or somethings eat ALL OF THEM. I don't understand; I live in a suburb. I had no problems with growing things in my last garden Sure, a plant or two would get eating by the hordes of snails, but not EVERYTHING. Here's my location.

Southern California: I'm finding my beans eaten to a stump and sometimes, I find the tops of the bean plants as if they have been chopped off.

I'm in need of a poison that's can kill whatever's eating them AND isn't too deadly to the environment as I have a dog in the backyard (the garden is fenced off from it). I don't want it to eat the poison and then crawl away and die and have the dog eat the insect and poison himself.

Any ideas on what it could it be?

The Backroad Astronomer
2011-Jun-17, 11:16 AM
Could be cut worms. Their little worms that come out of the ground and eat the stems all the way around. I don't know about any poisons to get rid of them.

The Backroad Astronomer
2011-Jul-12, 01:55 PM
I put some black plastic on the ground around my peppers and tomatoes to warm the ground and also warped my tomato cages with clear plastic. The black plastic proved to a favorite area for ants to live under and they went and killed a couple of tomato plants and one plant is almost dead. So this weekend I took all the black plastic off the ground and took the clear off because the plant were now being restrained for it and finished doing its job.

Already got some lettuce out of the garden, and soon some peas and romain lettuce.

suntrack2
2011-Jul-12, 07:07 PM
I think they(worms) are naturally land cultivators than making any toxics.

secondly every year spraying of different chemicals in the agricultural field may enable toxics through the plants
in the human body.

I have not ever heard about toxic preparation done by the worms.(google search is required)

In my childhood my friends were too naughty they spreads few salt on the warms and later the warms
starts moving fast due to the irritation, but my friends used to laugh at worms.

Obviously some species of worms may dangerous for crops(I am not sure), whenever they hungry they can
make a hole in tomato also, but don't worry, teeth of worms are not that powerful. :) worms are mostly use
to come on the surface when there is a rainy season (it is observed).

Here: http://toxics.usgs.gov/highlights/earthworms.html

sunil

Fazor
2011-Jul-15, 02:06 PM
I figured I'd post here rather than starting a new thread, because it had to happen while gardening. But man, I had forgotten how much I hate poison ivy! I don't get it often -- we used to play paint ball in the woods, and you'd be too busy crawling and diving and generally avoiding being shot while shooting at others to care about looking for what kind of things you're running/crawling/walking through. I never got it then.

But I have a very small rash of it on my left ring and middle finger. Maybe six small blisters total, which form a short line. It itches like crazy, regardless of what kind of anti-itch cream I put on it. And it's been about two weeks and hasn't even started going away yet. Consider me annoyed.

Tinaa
2011-Jul-15, 10:14 PM
My garden is not doing well. It has been so hot for so long with no rain. I keep it watered but it looks so sad. About the only thing I am harvesting plenty of is okra, cayennes, jalapenos and banana peppers. Grape tomatoes are doing ok. The first few picks of the jalapenos were sweet ans hot. The last bunch I picked were super hot. I generally can cut them up with no problem but these set my hands on fire for several hours. I'm going to string up the cayenne peppers adn dry them but I still have too many. Any ideas out there for what to do with the cayenne pepper?

Cucumbers died, zucchini not producing well. Maybe it is the soil. Put down lots of good fresh manure before planting and prepared the soil well. I'm about to harvest my first cantaloupe. It is kind of small but I hope it will be good.

BigDon
2011-Jul-21, 07:54 PM
WHAT'S EATING MY GARDEN!!!

I planted pole-beans, about 60 individuals plants; they were growing good and when they reached about an inch or two high, something or somethings eat ALL OF THEM. I don't understand; I live in a suburb. I had no problems with growing things in my last garden Sure, a plant or two would get eating by the hordes of snails, but not EVERYTHING. Here's my location.

Southern California: I'm finding my beans eaten to a stump and sometimes, I find the tops of the bean plants as if they have been chopped off.

I'm in need of a poison that's can kill whatever's eating them AND isn't too deadly to the environment as I have a dog in the backyard (the garden is fenced off from it). I don't want it to eat the poison and then crawl away and die and have the dog eat the insect and poison himself.

Any ideas on what it could it be?

If it's cutworms or armyworms you have some options.

The best option is using parasitic nematodes available at nurserys and big hardware outlets in the gardening section. It will keep them away for a while as the nematodes take up residence. But you can't find them all the time. Also works on craneflies, click beetle larva and other ground dwelling pupating insects, few of which are friends to your garden.

Bt is only really effective against young cutworms.

Cornmeal is another option. The cutworms eat it greedily but it doesn't give them any lysine or tryptophane so they die of protein malfunctions. (With a short lifespan and metamorphesis in their future every meal has to count.)

The Backroad Astronomer
2011-Aug-12, 11:33 AM
The Garden is doing well. Already picked 5 heads of romain and plenty of leaf lettuce. I also planted some romain from seed and they coming up and we might get some from them as well. One tomato plant has about 20 tomatoes. Haven't really picked many wild raspberries we have plenty in the freezer from last year. Picked some early potatoes and I have been picking off many potato beetle larva. The cucumbers plants and the few cucumbers are small and the plants are turning kind of pale, I think it is because the last of couple weeks we had a lot of rain.

HenrikOlsen
2011-Aug-12, 01:56 PM
I've gotten about 3 kg of tomatoes so far this year and the grapes look like they might give a majorly good crop, it's going to be interesting to see if the garden ends up being sold before or after I can harvest them.

The Backroad Astronomer
2011-Aug-12, 02:58 PM
What do you mean by the garden being sold?
(if you don't mind me asking.)

The Backroad Astronomer
2011-Aug-15, 03:13 PM
Also going to get plenty of soldier beans this year. Have some red and hot peppers coming as well.

ETA just an added update

Just looked at the bag of green and yellow beans a friend of the family dropped by I am getting some but not as many as they got but I didn't plant many beans this year. Also I got plenty of dill but the cucumbers aren't big enough for pickles. Some year I will get just right.

HenrikOlsen
2011-Aug-16, 09:43 PM
What do you mean by the garden being sold?
(if you don't mind me asking.)
It's an allotment garden and I'm selling it because I don't have the time to keep it in the state it really should be.

Githyanki
2011-Aug-16, 10:37 PM
I have a question; bromethalin was used in a garden area that I plan to use and I believe a few dead rats, who were poisoned by bromethalin are buried there. Should I use the area for a vegetable garden?


And thanks for the suggestions, but it was rats. I've killed about eight of them with one rat trap.

BigDon
2011-Aug-17, 04:53 PM
I have a question; bromethalin was used in a garden area that I plan to use and I believe a few dead rats, who were poisoned by bromethalin are buried there. Should I use the area for a vegetable garden?


And thanks for the suggestions, but it was rats. I've killed about eight of them with one rat trap.

Yeah, rats will do that too...

I use to work in a commercial greenhouse and rats love the stems of pothos vines

The Backroad Astronomer
2011-Aug-19, 03:07 PM
Yesterday I picked some the tomatoes while they were still green because one rotted while stil one the vine so I picke the ones that were there the longest. What will happen to them they will be turned into chow pickes this weekend by my mother. I left a lot that were still forming hoping that we will get the weather soon so they will ripen.

Fazor
2011-Aug-22, 04:02 PM
Hrmph. I spent the weekend cutting out the bushes that grow on our side of the chain link fence, since the neighbor cut them out on their side. Tara helped. The whole time I warned her to watch out because there was some poison ivy growing in them. I made sure to go in and take the 'ol "haz mat" shower every time I came in (once after cutting the stuff down, and again after throwing it in the truck and hauling it off.)

But Tara never really heeded my warnings. So, of course . . . she doesn't have any rashes, whereas about a fourth of the skin on my right arm is swollen and bumpy. From about halfway down my bicep down to the middle of my forearm on the inside. So the rash is right around the crease of my arm. That's real comfortable . . .

Also have a few splotches of it on my left forearm that may turn into a larger rash, and a half dozen small splotches on my right leg that may turn into a large rash. Last time I had poison ivy, it took a good week and a half for the full rash to develop, so I'm afraid to see how bad this gets. Oh well, can't do much about it now.

If I seem cranky for the next few weeks, you'll know why.

The Backroad Astronomer
2011-Aug-22, 04:24 PM
"What is that the Reds suck"

trinitree88
2011-Aug-22, 05:00 PM
Hrmph. I spent the weekend cutting out the bushes that grow on our side of the chain link fence, since the neighbor cut them out on their side. Tara helped. The whole time I warned her to watch out because there was some poison ivy growing in them. I made sure to go in and take the 'ol "haz mat" shower every time I came in (once after cutting the stuff down, and again after throwing it in the truck and hauling it off.)

But Tara never really heeded my warnings. So, of course . . . she doesn't have any rashes, whereas about a fourth of the skin on my right arm is swollen and bumpy. From about halfway down my bicep down to the middle of my forearm on the inside. So the rash is right around the crease of my arm. That's real comfortable . . .

Also have a few splotches of it on my left forearm that may turn into a larger rash, and a half dozen small splotches on my right leg that may turn into a large rash. Last time I had poison ivy, it took a good week and a half for the full rash to develop, so I'm afraid to see how bad this gets. Oh well, can't do much about it now.

If I seem cranky for the next few weeks, you'll know why.

Fazor. Get thee to a garden center or Lowe's or some such....and but some TECNU. Lotion will absorb the oils out of the skin and reduce the ensuing histamine reaction ~ 90%. Landscapers and Scouts of America wonder-stuff. Try it. No I don't own stock, but I was an assistant troup leader when my daughter was a Girl Scout...(it's a long story) good luck pete

Fazor
2011-Aug-22, 05:20 PM
Gracias Trinitree, I'll check it out.

The Backroad Astronomer
2011-Aug-23, 03:10 PM
Last week we a got alot of beans from a neighbor, now my beans are being picked. Yup, you guess it right now I am full of beans.

Taeolas
2011-Aug-24, 07:27 PM
I moved into a second floor Condo with a nice big south facing deck last Easter, so I was able to try and grow plants for the first time in a long long time. I picked up a patio tomato, a patio cucumber, and 4 planters to try and tend through the summer. I put a tray of tomatoes in 1 of the planters, and the other 3 have various peppers.

Well, now its the end of the season (getting there up here). I lost some tomatoes to end rot, but once I looked it up and increased my watering, the rest have done well. So far only the patio plant has ripened fully enough to pick some, but the rest of the tomato plants have big fruit on them, starting to ripen through yellow towards red.

The green peppers have done really well; a bit smaller than store bought, but very tasty.

The Jalopeno peppers have done extremely well. I've picked a couple dozen already, and there's easily another couple dozen left, almost ready for picking. (all told I only had 2 plants).

The yellow pepper plants are loaded with fruit, and lightening from green to yellow, so I expect them to be ready in a week or two.

Sadly, the cucumbers never took off well. The plants are still growing, but the fruit dried up before it could really grow. I suspect I didn't keep it wet enough through the summer, and maybe I should have kept the plants tighter to the pot so they'd be shaded more. I'll probably give another patio pot of cukes a try next year though.

Next year as well, I'll get a few more planters and spread out the plants more. 2 of the planters have 3 pepper plants each, which is plenty of space. But the other two planters have 6-8 plants in each, which is way too crowded. (looked like a lot of space to start but then they really started to grow).

I've also got a herb garden up front, and it did well enough, but I'll be splitting that across 2 planters next year too; 4 herbs in 1 planter is a bit too tight. :)

Overall, I'd say my first attempts at gardening since '98 or so were very successful. I'll be picking for weeks to come, mainly as I need until the first frost comes (which hopefully won't be for awhile yet; 9C this morning was a bit scary though).

The Backroad Astronomer
2011-Aug-25, 04:30 PM
Well picking the red potatoes and the russets this week and got a fair amount. Also got a lot of peppers. What I thought were hot peppers are not hot peppers and only got a few of those but two of the plants were eaten by insects and the other two were chewed up as well. I also had problems with my cucumbers as well as squash and pumpkins. I think the problem there is that we had a cooler then normal summer and a lot wetter.

Githyanki
2011-Aug-25, 07:39 PM
My gardens are growing exponentially; I have a heavy-clay soil so I dug out the garden and moved the clay to the border; I then filled it would good-quality soil I got off of Craig'slist for free (no more paying 4.08 for a cull palate from Home Depo!!!).

When I water, the clay borders hold in the water, so my garden fills up really, really fast. I've got about nine tomatoes (Roma, Early girl, heirloom, best boy, cherry tomatoes and a surviving pepper that's being shut out by the tomatoes. I've got about eight corn coming up, some beets, a potato and plenty of green-beans.

I have tomatoes and peppers growing as weeds. When ever I chop a tomato or pepper, what's left on the chopping board, which is usually seeds, I throw into my garden. Luckily, the growing season here is from February to November, so I have plenty of time.

Fazor
2011-Sep-01, 11:45 PM
Here's a question; I noticed today that many of the little viney weeds that our yard get are covered in yellow aphids. I don't have any actual flowers/plants that I care about. Any harm in just letting them run their course? (eg, do they end up seeking indoors?) I understand aphids can be a pain to get rid of -- particularly since I have dogs and don't want to use any heavy pesticides in the yard.

They're disgusting; but I don't mind letting them be if they won't cause problems.

The Backroad Astronomer
2011-Sep-12, 02:10 PM
Well picked the soldier beans over the weekend and up with over 6 liters of beans enough for few dinners over the winter.

Taeolas
2011-Sep-13, 11:26 AM
Yeah I pulled the rest of my peppers and my 1 misshapen cuke over the weekend. I'll probably pull the plants this week some time.

One problem I had with my tomatoes was that they started splitting on me. Anyone knows what causes that? Did I just not water enough or maybe too much?

HenrikOlsen
2011-Sep-13, 04:21 PM
From what I read, too much heat.

Taeolas
2011-Sep-13, 07:48 PM
Too much heat wasn't an issue around here this summer at least. :) But from doing some quick googling, it looks like inconsistant watering and/or fertilizing were probably my culprits. Oh well, I'll know better for next year. (Especially since it looks like I won't have a trip to Vegas in the prime growing season next year)

All in all, my deck gardens did turn out well (despite Irene stripping most of those split tomatoes off the vines). I've got the peppers frozen until the next time I need them, and hopefully next year will be even better.

HenrikOlsen
2011-Sep-17, 01:03 PM
Picked the grapes off the vine, 2˝ kg from the one plant this time, 1˝ kg last year, I think I chose a good way to prune it.

Clive Tester
2011-Oct-30, 07:45 PM
Anyone here had any experience with planting thyme lawns?

Githyanki
2011-Nov-01, 06:07 PM
Too much heat wasn't an issue around here this summer at least. :) But from doing some quick googling, it looks like inconsistant watering and/or fertilizing were probably my culprits. Oh well, I'll know better for next year. (Especially since it looks like I won't have a trip to Vegas in the prime growing season next year)

All in all, my deck gardens did turn out well (despite Irene stripping most of those split tomatoes off the vines). I've got the peppers frozen until the next time I need them, and hopefully next year will be even better.

If you enclose your patio with glass, could you make a greenhouse?

Taeolas
2011-Nov-03, 12:30 PM
If you enclose your patio with glass, could you make a greenhouse?

I think my local condo association wouldn't like that. :) And even if they would allow it, my south facing deck doesn't have a roof so I'd have to enclose a lot more were I to try that. (The north facing deck has a roof, but no real sun views)

The Backroad Astronomer
2011-Nov-28, 06:57 PM
I have to admit a screwed up a bit. When I picked the soldier beans I put then a plastic container that didn't allow then to breath, and they were still damp and most got ruined. Hopefully some will be useful for seeds next year. But I guess for the northern hemisphere residents this is all for the year.

Taeolas
2012-May-09, 02:15 PM
Well, Spring is here, most of the gardening centres are open in my neck of the woods, but it is still *just* a hair too cold to plant/have planters out. But I've got my planters and 6 bags of soil all set to start soon.

Not sure what I'll plant yet; it will depend on what the local centres have. I am going to try a cucumber pot again, but probably not as many tomatoes. Definitly some Green and Orange pepers, and jalopenos; the Jalapenos went well last year.

Herbs will also depend on what catches my eye. Probably some basil of some sort and chives and whatever else smells/tastes good.

I'm hoping this weekend or next weekend (May Two-Four next weekend!) will be warm so I can get started.

The Backroad Astronomer
2012-May-09, 04:31 PM
Well to continue the saga of the beans. There was enough to make one pot of beans after I spent an entire afternoon sorting thru them to get the ggod ones out. The garden almost finished tilling but there is no seed money for a couple weeks yet. Still trying to make up my mind on what to get. Of course there are potatoes but what kind to get and how how much. This garden the garden will be about double the size of last year.

Taeolas
2012-May-18, 11:26 AM
Started my gardening adventures for the year. I've got some Garlic Chives, some oregano and some basil for herbs for the front garden; and 3 Maritime Tomato plants for the back. I'll probably look for another variety of tomato for the back and my selection of peppers of course. And I want to try another cucumber pot too.

I picked up a hanging strawberry planter at Sobey's last night; going to see how that works. I've got it hanging in the front for now, but I need to pick up a hook to hang it off the back deck as best I can since that faces south. (It's awkward because the privacy divider between my deck and my neighbour, where I can put hanger hooks, 'slopes' away from the house to the point that the end at the end of the deck is only 3 ft off the railing).

Has anyone had any experience with hanging strawberry planters? The pot I have has a lot of runners hanging off of it, and I'm nto sure if I should let them be, trim them back, or fold them back into the pot. I'm almost tempted to let them grow into a railing planter when I move the hanging pot to the back deck.

The Backroad Astronomer
2012-May-23, 04:42 PM
The runners for the strawberries will need to be put into some soild because they will start growing roots but I never did in anykind of pot before. Chives got no shortage of them here and I am the only one that eats them.

Taeolas
2012-May-23, 07:14 PM
Yeah I don't have room/ground space to put the runners in anything so I'm wondering if I should just chop them off and let the plant focus on the parts that stay in the planter.

I did most of my planting/buying over the past long weekend.

Picked up:

2 Green Pepper plants
2 Red Pepper Plants
2 Orange pepper plants
1 tomato plant that grows mini tomatoes (maybe cherry tomatoes; not sure).
1 beefeater tomato plant
Goes along with the 3 Scotia tomato plants I've already got.

And a pile of herbs, including Sage, Basil, Chives, rosemary, lemonmint and something else I'm blanking on.

Of course I'm out of planters now. I'll need another patio planter for 2 tomatoes, and 2 more rail planters for the last of my herbs and my plans for 2 jalopeno pepper plants. :)

I know my mom's gonna be boggled by the back deck when she sees it; but I've always loved planting and growing; so I don't care. :)

PetersCreek
2012-May-23, 08:10 PM
The WifeŽ and I made our rounds at the local greenhouses over the last two weekends. Now that I have a couple of mint plants potted...for mint juleps...I can say Summer is officially underway for me. The herb garden is shaping up with basil, thyme, rosemary, tarragon, curly and flat parsley, cilantro, dwarf lavender, and chives. The chives were from last year's planting and surprised us by overwintering beneath a 6-foot snow berm. We put a variety of flowers in beds and containers: African and English daisies, pansies, dianthus, impatiens, violas, geraniums, marigolds, lobelia, and a couple of others. The forget-me-nots we planted a couple of years ago are back again and spreading. They've started to bloom after not doing so last year. We also bought a couple of hanging pots with a mix of flowers, including fuscia.

The Backroad Astronomer
2012-May-24, 01:39 PM
we've had chives planted here for more than 20 years and they have survived being under snow to -40 C to be being cut with a lawn mower.

HenrikOlsen
2012-May-24, 02:57 PM
Chives are nearly unkillable.