PDA

View Full Version : show on Pluto



Gomar
2010-Mar-07, 03:59 AM
Any see that show about Pluto on PBS that's playing all the time? It stars that Director of the planetarium in NYC Mr.Tyson.
Anyway, he found the widow of the man who discovered Pluto, she is 97 now. Her son still has the telescopes used to discover Pluto. 1st, I am astonished those things are not in the Smithsonian.
2nd, why interview the whole family?
3rd, so if Pluto is not a planet the stock market will collapse, the ice caps will melt, the U.S. will switch to metric, and Jimmy Hoffa will be found.

mantiss
2010-Mar-07, 03:18 PM
3rd the U.S. will switch to metric

'bout time!! ;)

laurele
2010-Mar-07, 10:19 PM
Tyson accurately shows that the debate over Pluto's planet status is very much ongoing and that there is no consensus on the matter among astronomers. This is a much more neutral stand than he has previously taken and is quite encouraging.

Van Rijn
2010-Mar-07, 11:26 PM
Any see that show about Pluto on PBS that's playing all the time? It stars that Director of the planetarium in NYC Mr.Tyson.
Anyway, he found the widow of the man who discovered Pluto, she is 97 now. Her son still has the telescopes used to discover Pluto. 1st, I am astonished those things are not in the Smithsonian.


I think you misunderstood that. The 13" astrograph used to find Pluto is still at the Lowell Observatory. Here's one picture:

http://plutovian.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/pluto-telescope3.jpg

Apparently it still gets some use.

The telescopes that Tombaugh's son showed were telescopes Clyde Tombaugh had built himself, for his own use.

cjl
2010-Mar-08, 01:01 AM
Tyson accurately shows that the debate over Pluto's planet status is very much ongoing and that there is no consensus on the matter among astronomers. This is a much more neutral stand than he has previously taken and is quite encouraging.
Nope. Pluto is clearly a KBO. It dynamically and physically is quite thoroughly different from both the gas/ice giant planets and from the terrestrial planets, but similar to a vast number of objects that we have detected in the far outer solar system. It's no more of a planet than the asteroids are, and the situation is quite analogous (since the first couple of asteroids that were discovered were classified as planets, and then reclassified as asteroids once it became clear that there was a region with many similar objects rather than a single one).

(Aren't you getting tired of this by now?)

mantiss
2010-Mar-08, 06:08 PM
Tyson accurately shows that the debate over Pluto's planet status is very much ongoing

I have to disagree, that thing is settled just as much as the case for Ceres not being a planet has been long settled, Pluto doesn't fit with the other planets, it's much more at ease with the KBOs and TNOs, where it is. Let's celebrate Tombaugh's discovery that came half a century before the 2nd KBO found and drop all the bad blood. No one would fight for Ceres being a planet nowadays, so it should be for Pluto, the only reason Mr. Tyson is softening his tone is that 1) not flare up the debate again, a debate that is in his view clearly over. and 2) being easy on the american public. :)

I'm with cjl, that debate is over.

ToSeek
2010-Mar-15, 03:42 PM
Last Thursday evening I was at a talk with Tyson based on the "Pluto Files" episode, and his attitude now is that the term "planet" isn't even a particularly useful one. We can group objects in the solar system based on what we're interested in studying - rings, atmospheres, polar caps, etc. - and use those useful groupings, rather than trying to come up with a pointless definition.

Jerry
2010-Mar-17, 09:06 AM
Useless? How now would we determine our horreriscopes without known Mars is in retro and Venus sparing with Jupiter? I mean, it could be too frightening to get out of bed.

noncryptic
2010-Mar-17, 01:14 PM
Tyson accurately shows that the debate over Pluto's planet status is very much ongoing and that there is no consensus on the matter among astronomers.

To the contrary;
As Tyson points out in his talks about Pluto, when it comes to classification of objects in astronomy there can not be more consensus than by what the International Astronomical Union decides. http://www.iau.org/public/pluto/

In science there is about as much debate about Pluto's status as there is about Evolution and Global Warming: essentially none.