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View Full Version : The Belt Sword or, I Never Knew I Needed This



SkepticJ
2010-Mar-08, 05:05 AM
Lightsabers? Who needs 'em when you've got the belt sword (http://www.beltswords.com/)!

Isn't it just like something out of a cyberpunk novel?

I find it to be simultaneously extremely cool, and ridiculous.

novaderrik
2010-Mar-08, 05:19 AM
neat swords, but annoying website.

sarongsong
2010-Mar-08, 05:52 AM
Link doesn't load "image"---still have no idea what the OP is about!

hhEb09'1
2010-Mar-08, 06:15 AM
I got some sort of lightning bolt

What's a belt sword? Is it a belt that turns into a solid sword? Interesting.

grant hutchison
2010-Mar-08, 10:05 AM
What's a belt sword? Is it a belt that turns into a solid sword? Interesting.It's a flexible sword that threads into a set of belt loops for concealment, and springs straight on withdrawal. Bemusingly unpleasant.
They need to work on the containment system: anything that relies on velcro to keep large springy sharp objects in close proximity to your abdomen is a sure-fire accident waiting to happen.

Grant Hutchison

Jeff Root
2010-Mar-08, 11:27 AM
I didn't see any pictures (aside from the very nice lightnng bolt), but by
clicking on "Dialup connection" I was able to read:



World’s First - Massive Sword - Hidden in Pants Belt
Massive Totally Concealed Sword: 32 Inches Long By 1 Inches Wide

Lightning Fast
Can’t -- See-it! Hear-it! Stop-it!
Until It’s Too Late!
RazorSword is Totally Hidden and Concealed in a Flexible Linked
Tunnel of High Carbon Spring Steel

RazorSword Deploys Instantly From Your Pants Belt
The carbon spring steel tunnel sounds at least a little safer than velcro.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

mugaliens
2010-Mar-08, 11:42 AM
I prefer a more traditional means of defense.

grant hutchison
2010-Mar-08, 12:42 PM
The carbon spring steel tunnel sounds at least a little safer than velcro.The carbon spring steel tunnel is velcroed to your belt: or so we're told in the video, by a man who sports the obligatory moustache-and-camouflage look, albeit in a low-key sort of way.

Grant Hutchison

BigDon
2010-Mar-08, 03:20 PM
I prefer a more traditional means of defense.

Relying on someone else with a gun? After a three to six minute delay?

:)

Fazor
2010-Mar-08, 03:24 PM
Relying on someone else with a gun? After a three to six minute delay?

:)

Even more traditional; running faster than at least one other person you're with.

mahesh
2010-Mar-08, 03:35 PM
Quote:
World’s First - Massive Sword - Hidden in Pants Belt
Massive Totally Concealed Sword: 32 Inches Long By 1 Inches Wide

Lightning Fast
Can’t -- See-it! Hear-it! Stop-it!
Until It’s Too Late!
RazorSword is Totally Hidden and Concealed in a Flexible Linked
Tunnel of High Carbon Spring Steel

RazorSword Deploys Instantly From Your Pants Belt

Is it detectable at check-in points / boarding aircraft?

shhh...Mr Hutchison...anything that relies on velcro to keep large springy sharp objects in close proximity to your abdomen is a sure-fire accident waiting to happen.
...don't s a y i t s o l o u d ...the morons may hear you...

SkepticJ
2010-Mar-08, 07:16 PM
The carbon spring steel tunnel is velcroed to your belt: or so we're told in the video, by a man who sports the obligatory moustache-and-camouflage look, albeit in a low-key sort of way.

Grant Hutchison

Dual Lock tape. It isn't your grandmother's velcro.

In any case, normal velcro is stronger (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Velcro#Strength) than you're giving it credit for.

grant hutchison
2010-Mar-08, 08:00 PM
In any case, normal velcro is stronger (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Velcro#Strength) than you're giving it credit for.I give it credit for being strong. I also give it credit for ageing badly and sometimes picking up secondary material that interferes with its function.

Grant Hutchison

BigDon
2010-Mar-08, 09:43 PM
I think Mr. Hutchison is trying to tell us this is right up there with stashing a pistol in your front waistband.

Sounds like a good idea until you have to use it under stress, in which case you stand a good chance of "pulling a Tupak" and blowing your own johnson off.

Which is fatal all by itself more often than not.

Larry Jacks
2010-Mar-08, 10:11 PM
That's why they have training, Don, to avoid those kinds of mistakes. Just because your average sailor* may not have had that kind of training with small arms, it doesn't mean others are similarly handicapped.

*And no, SEALS are not your average sailor!

Bluevision
2010-Mar-08, 10:11 PM
I dunno this actually seems kinda cool, though useless unless you're trying to get those tricky security checkpoints in hotspots and airports! :p

For actual use, I'll stick with my real knives. Real swords aren't of much use to me, but they are good just to look nice! :D

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Mar-08, 10:18 PM
It would great for the Highlander.
There can only be one.

grant hutchison
2010-Mar-08, 11:16 PM
There can only be one.Indeed.
I believe Don has already referred to the danger of lopping off an essential part of your anatomy.

Grant Hutchison

BigDon
2010-Mar-08, 11:39 PM
That's why they have training, Don, to avoid those kinds of mistakes. Just because your average sailor* may not have had that kind of training with small arms, it doesn't mean others are similarly handicapped.

*And no, SEALS are not your average sailor!

True, but no amount of training is going to stop you from squeezing the trigger if you are actually being shot concurrant to you grasping the weapon. (Like that rapper Tupak, who managed to shoot himself in the groin twice trying to draw his gun while being shot to death in his car.)

I forget the name of the reflex. I had a three day old boxer's fracture set without without painkillers once at Tripler Hospital.* (Which itself was a re-separation of a bone set the previous week) I didn't faint or cry out, but all of my extremities curled up tight and my finger nails cut deep into my palms without me even realizing it.

That didn't happen even when I got "annoyingly" burned that one time and I couldn't get pain remediation until the doctors determined if willy was still alive of not.

*Better off than the guy beside me who was having a fractured femur reduced, also without pain medications. Why? (This should cheese off Grant.) Because he's going to faint during the process anyway.

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Mar-09, 12:25 AM
As a kid we had these tops that came in cereal packages. You would pull a cord wrapped around the middle and thing would would spin. For some reason I am thinking of those.

grant hutchison
2010-Mar-09, 12:28 AM
*Better off than the guy beside me who was having a fractured femur reduced, also without pain medications. Why? (This should cheese off Grant.) Because he's going to faint during the process anyway.Cheeses me off. Amateur-hour stuff. Fainting doesn't stop the muscle spasm that makes the fracture difficult to reduce.

Grant Hutchison

Larry Jacks
2010-Mar-09, 12:56 AM
True, but no amount of training is going to stop you from squeezing the trigger if you are actually being shot concurrant to you grasping the weapon.

Here's how it's done (http://media.npr.org/programs/morning/features/2005/mar/marines/kasal_large.jpg), Don. Notice the position of Sergeant Major Kasel's (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bradley_Kasal) trigger finger. Despite his wounds, the man knows his trigger discipline. Your assertion simply isn't correct, at least not for those who have had the proper training. Just because some fool rapper didn't know what he was doing, don't assume everyone is just as stupid.

BigDon
2010-Mar-09, 01:06 AM
Okay.

You win Larry.

At ease.

Middenrat
2010-Mar-09, 02:22 AM
It's legal to carry a concealed bladed weapon as long as your arm ? Perhaps they should be handing them out to Visitors at airports instead of screening and refusing entry for any slightest misdemeanour.
Of course, I want one, but my attempts to obtain defensive weaponry have been thwarted before it got off the plane (tele-baton and pepper spray) and a home visit from the CID.

Nick Theodorakis
2010-Mar-09, 02:54 AM
It's legal to carry a concealed bladed weapon as long as your arm ? ...

In the US, legality of the various types of bladed (and other) weapons varies by state. Many states explicitly ban concealed sword-like weapons (the usual example is the sword-cane), though.

Nick

SkepticJ
2010-Mar-09, 03:09 AM
I also give it credit for ageing badly and sometimes picking up secondary material that interferes with its function.

How hard are you on your velcro?

My father had a foul-weather jacket that lasted over twenty years, and its velcro still worked fine up to the point when a tree branch snagged into the jacket, tearing a ruining gash along the side.

BigDon
2010-Mar-09, 03:13 AM
In the US, legality of the various types of bladed (and other) weapons varies by state. Many states explicitly ban concealed sword-like weapons (the usual example is the sword-cane), though.

Nick

Oddly enough...

In California you can't have a staff or walking stick with a spring loaded blade, but you can have a spear with a screw top cover. As long as your have to unscrew the cap manually it's legal.

Then working from that...

When I was a LOT younger some friends and I made one. Screw top with a six inch blade. Then playing with design we found out that a "robust" enough cap and a sturdy retaining chain made a more devastating weapon.

As a spear you could do only so much to a 4x4 post. The final iteration of the spear, cap and chain we did without the blade altogether. And we used a sash weight. I sheared the post about eight inchs off the ground with a full on swing.

Which made it "slung shot" and thus a felony to posess.

grant hutchison
2010-Mar-09, 11:34 AM
How hard are you on your velcro?Not particularly. My old jacket has a patch of Velcro at mid-chest which doesn't stick any more, but it's not a problem.
However, there are are established safety routines for the regular replacement of Velcro whenever failure could cause death or injury: skydiving, scuba, medical applications. These routines are driven by previous bad experiences. A while ago, for instance, I found essentially non-stick worn Velcro "securing" medical monitoring equipment to a patient transfer trolley.

Grant Hutchison

mugaliens
2010-Mar-10, 10:42 AM
Relying on someone else with a gun? After a three to six minute delay?

:)

Ha! You're baiting me! You know I can't elucidate without risking a repeat of previous suspension...

mugaliens
2010-Mar-10, 10:49 AM
Cheeses me off. Amateur-hour stuff. Fainting doesn't stop the muscle spasm that makes the fracture difficult to reduce.

Grant Hutchison

Yet I shattered (totally) my collarbone in 7th grade.

No cheese, no spasm. No reduction, for that matter - it was gone (the x-ray looked like etae carinea).

Doc gave me a brace and six weeks later couldn't tell which clavical it was.

I really hate hitting trees at 65 mph... (much later)

grant hutchison
2010-Mar-10, 11:06 AM
Yet I shattered (totally) my collarbone in 7th grade.

No cheese, no spasm. No reduction, for that matter - it was gone (the x-ray looked like etae carinea).I'm not sure why your post quotes my remarks on the management of a femoral fracture, starts with "yet", and then describes a clavicular fracture. Different bones, different fractures, different muscles, different problems: different treatments.

Grant Hutchison

mugaliens
2010-Mar-10, 11:20 PM
I'm not sure why your post quotes my remarks on the management of a femoral fracture, starts with "yet", and then describes a clavicular fracture. Different bones, different fractures, different muscles, different problems: different treatments.

Grant Hutchison

No point, really. I'm no doctor - perhaps the fracture cut a nerve? I dunno.