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View Full Version : Will a lava lamp work in Jupiter's gravity?



Ufonaut99
2010-Mar-09, 12:17 PM
Only one way to find out ...

Meccano to the rescue ! (http://neil.fraser.name/hardware/centrifuge/)

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Mar-09, 12:23 PM
Cool and also the last thing Bigdons brother wants him to see.

Swift
2010-Mar-09, 01:40 PM
Cool that he built a centrifuge to find out, but unsurprising. Lava lamps work by convection and density differences and the amount of convection will actually increase in higher gravity.

Glom
2010-Mar-09, 02:01 PM
The motion seemed much more turbulent than I would normally expect.

Brilliantly produced video though.

NEOWatcher
2010-Mar-09, 02:05 PM
The motion seemed much more turbulent than I would normally expect.
Me too; but it looked "swirly", so I assume there's a considerable Coriolis effect.

schlaugh
2010-Mar-09, 02:05 PM
Some folks have waaaaaaayyy too much time on their hands.

But still fun. :lol:

cjl
2010-Mar-09, 06:41 PM
The motion seemed much more turbulent than I would normally expect.

Brilliantly produced video though.
I would assume that his centrifuge was too small, and the high rotation rate caused a considerable Coriolis effect. Therefore, it was interesting, but not really conclusive.

Paul Beardsley
2010-Mar-09, 07:16 PM
May I humbly suggest that this thread be upgraded?

I know its primary purpose is to be a bit of a laugh - and it succeeds - but there's an underlying seriousness that is frankly awesome. It's the sort of thing Benjamin Franklin or Galileo would have done if the technology had been available to them. The exact antithesis of the usual "I've got an against the mainstream idea, I can't be bothered to do any maths or carry out any experiments but I think you should take me seriously anyway..."

SkepticJ
2010-Mar-10, 01:22 AM
I found this site (http://www.meccano.us/) several years ago when I was researching Charles Babbage's machines.

Amazing stuff.

Too bad real meccano isn't as popular as it used to be. Gotta give the kids rounded-off plastic junk--can't have them hurting themselves.

jokergirl
2010-Mar-10, 08:27 AM
Awesome! I love such experiments.
That's a "must be shown in the classroom" kind of thing...

;)

Sententia
2010-Mar-10, 08:32 AM
What a interesting experiment !! would love to hear more like it..

mugaliens
2010-Mar-10, 09:37 AM
No. Gravity on Jupiter is so strong it defies all known laws of physics.

I'm joking, of course...

Yes, it would just work much faster at the same temp.

Provence
2010-Mar-10, 10:59 AM
I would assume that his centrifuge was too small, and the high rotation rate caused a considerable Coriolis effect. Therefore, it was interesting, but not really conclusive.

Yes, I think the only way to really know for sure is to send one on a space mission. But all the short-sighted people will refuse to provide funding.

cjl
2010-Mar-10, 06:49 PM
Yes, I think the only way to really know for sure is to send one on a space mission. But all the short-sighted people will refuse to provide funding.
Or just build a bigger centrifuge...

rommel543
2010-Mar-10, 09:49 PM
Or just build a bigger centrifuge...

:think: I'm thinking 2x4s and a electric motor from a washing machine hooked up for a variable speed control.

How big/long would the boom arm need to be to avoid the Coriolis effect?

HenrikOlsen
2010-Mar-11, 12:03 AM
Totally? Infinitely long.

rommel543
2010-Mar-11, 08:42 PM
Well you're not going to get rid of it completely, but enough that it's not going to have such a visible effect. Although it is kinda cool looking.

mike alexander
2010-Mar-11, 09:16 PM
Better than lava lamps, the Great Mambo Chickens!

Life Sci Space Res. 1975;13:21-7.

Gravitational effects on body composition in birds.
Smith AH, Sanchez PO, Burton RR.

Chronic Acceleration Research Laboratory, Department of Animal Physiology, University of California, Davis, Calif., USA.

Gallinaceous birds, presenting a wide range of body size, were adapted physiologically to hyperdynamic environments, provided by chronic centrifugation. Chemical composition was measured directly on prepared carcasses, which were anatomically comparable, and more amenable to analysis than the intact body. Body mass and body fat decreased arithmetically with increasing field strength and also with increasing body mass. Water content of lean tissue increased in hyperdynamic environments, but irrespectively of body size.