PDA

View Full Version : Surplus Fruit Advice Needed.



BigDon
2010-Mar-13, 06:26 PM
I know how to deal with most kinds of fruit in bulk having a mother, grandmother and greatgrandmother who were canning/preserving types who did country fair stuff.

But I'm at a loss as to what to do with a surplus of oranges.

My fridge is stuffed and the ones out of the fridge are going to go south if I don't hurry. Nice navel oranges. Total shame not to try something.




*What beats having a great-grandmother who was a retired professional confectionist? I hereby state, for the record, that as a kid that rocked. Could probably make broom straw pie taste good. Almost got to a hundred and only stopped cooking at 92. Literally generations of neighborhood kids loved her. (This was in Washington/Oregon. I'd spend summers up there.)

Fazor
2010-Mar-13, 07:56 PM
Um. Orange mint jelly, for pork? Orange juice, for cups. Orange . . . um, you could throw oranges at people, for fun. :)

Gillianren
2010-Mar-13, 08:07 PM
Marmalade? I think I have a recipe around here somewhere, though I never touch the stuff myself.

kleindoofy
2010-Mar-13, 08:11 PM
Moonshine

megrfl
2010-Mar-13, 08:24 PM
Orange wine.

http://www.ehow.com/how_5108131_make-orange-wine.html

Rue
2010-Mar-13, 08:42 PM
Moonshine

I just got this video sent to me. Yeast, sugar, juice, bottle, balloon, a radiator are all anyone ever really needs.

MAKING ALCOHOL ON THE CHEAP (HOME BREW) (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=muMvhF0X12A)

HenrikOlsen
2010-Mar-13, 11:36 PM
But I'm at a loss as to what to do with a surplus of oranges.

My fridge is stuffed and the ones out of the fridge are going to go south if I don't hurry. Nice navel oranges. Total shame not to try something.
I'll second the marmalade.

Or chutney, I expect this recipe (http://www.allotment.org.uk/recipe/1125/sweet-orange-and-chilli-chutney-recipe/) can be adapted.

Other recipes (http://www.allotment.org.uk/recipe/category/fruit-recipe/oranges-recipe/) for oranges including several marmalade recipes.

tashirosgt
2010-Mar-13, 11:57 PM
I wonder how they make that "orange power" cleaner.

Trebuchet
2010-Mar-14, 12:27 AM
Screwdrivers.

Buttercup
2010-Mar-14, 03:13 AM
Make orange marmalade. It's actually rather easy (and needn't require pressurized canning). Check for Barefoot Contessa's recipe at Foodnetwork.com. I saw how she makes eeeeeasy marmalade during one of her shows in early February. Give some away as gifts. :)

Tobin Dax
2010-Mar-14, 03:46 AM
Screwdrivers.
While not a bad idea in most cases, IMO Don hasn't been posting enough stories lately. I don't want to see him take a break due to alcohol-induced seizures.

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Mar-14, 04:11 AM
He can make the screwdrivers out the orange juice and the moonshine made from the oranges.

Delvo
2010-Mar-14, 05:10 AM
Both brownies and banana bread can benefit from some orange flavor. For the banana bread, it can work with either juice or "zest" (tiny bits of the out part of the peel, scraped off), depending on how much other moisture the recipe you're using already has. The only brownie recipe I've seen that used oranges used the zest, not juice, presumably to avoid giving it too much moisture overall. If adding orange juice to either of these recipes, you could reduce or eliminate the water or milk.

After juicing an orange, the pulp is good to plop right on top of a piece of fish or chicken. I suspect it could work with pork in some cases, but haven't tried it, and don't think it would work with beef at all.

Gillianren
2010-Mar-14, 08:15 AM
Make orange marmalade. It's actually rather easy (and needn't require pressurized canning). Check for Barefoot Contessa's recipe at Foodnetwork.com. I saw how she makes eeeeeasy marmalade during one of her shows in early February. Give some away as gifts. :)

If you want it to last until gift-giving season, you're going to need pressurized canning. The stuff does go bad. However, Alton Brown has very good, basic advice about how to do it, and if I liked essentially anything at all that can be preserved at home, I'd consider trying it.

BigDon
2010-Mar-14, 06:53 PM
Thanks for the replys all.

Tobin, I have some weird firewall issue on my new set up that dumps me and eats my posts if I take too long. And my long posts take several hours to get just right. Lost three posts and about twelve hours all told. Still trying to figure it out.

Thanks for the links everybody. The winners are orange date bread and marmalade, which I adore. The bread only consumes a single orange per loaf. Marmalade plumb eluded me for some reason. Never tried to make it before.

Delvo
2010-Mar-14, 08:29 PM
Write long posts in another program, saving as often or seldom as you like along the way. Then copy & paste them here. That way, your time spent actually using this website to put the post in is just a few seconds.

You can include quote tags by using the quote buttons here, copying & pasting the quoted stuff (including the quote tags) into your other program where you write your response, and then just not hitting the button on this web page to actually post your reply yet until you come back later.

HenrikOlsen
2010-Mar-14, 08:47 PM
Mentioned before, ctrl-a select all, ctrl-c copy, then post. If it fails, log back in and paste to a new post.

It doesn't feel like talking to the right audience if it isn't written in a reply box.

Tobin Dax
2010-Mar-14, 10:39 PM
Ooh, orange date bread sounds good.


Tobin, I have some weird firewall issue on my new set up that dumps me and eats my posts if I take too long. And my long posts take several hours to get just right. Lost three posts and about twelve hours all told. Still trying to figure it out.
I've seen your posts about this elsewhere, and it's understandable. I just like reading your long posts, and don't want the situation aggravated. :)

The suggestion of writing your posts in Word (or similar) first, then pasting them into the text window is a good idea. My dad has been doing that for years, partly because Word had spellcheck before web browsers did and partly because it let him collect this his thoughts and consider what he was writing. I think that method would work well for you, too.

Ivan Viehoff
2010-Mar-15, 10:15 AM
Make orange marmalade.
You don't need very much orange to make marmalade. A kilo of oranges turns into a year's supply of marmalade for us. Also it is best to make marmalade with bitter oranges, and definitely not from oranges with very thick skins.

Making orange juice will use up much larger quantities of oranges.

Strange
2010-Mar-15, 10:21 AM
Also it is best to make marmalade with bitter oranges, and definitely not from oranges with very thick skins.

I would say it is essential to make it with Seville (bitter) oranges. Otherwise you end up with orange jam, which is OK if you like that sort of thing. (As opposed to marmalade which, if properly made, is one of the greatest inventions of all time.)


Making orange juice will use up much larger quantities of oranges.

And you can freeze it.

jokergirl
2010-Mar-15, 10:24 AM
Orange marmelade, just google the recipes, there's been a slew of them posted recently. (I think there was one on Evil Mad Scientist, even...)

;)

tlbs101
2010-Mar-15, 05:09 PM
Don,
If you want to preserve the fresh oranges a little longer, dip them in a mild bleach solution for a time.

One of my former bosses used this technique for preserving fresh oranges for more than a month. This was decades ago, so I cannot remember the proportion of bleach to water, nor can I recall the amount of time he soaked them, but I remember that he could keep a crate of navel oranges for over a month without having any problems with mold/rot.

I'm sure you can Google the info. about the bleach solution & soak-time.

Gillianren
2010-Mar-15, 06:05 PM
I would say it is essential to make it with Seville (bitter) oranges. Otherwise you end up with orange jam, which is OK if you like that sort of thing. (As opposed to marmalade which, if properly made, is one of the greatest inventions of all time.)

Does it have skin in it? Yes? It's marmalade by definition. (Though, of course, I'd peel the zest away from the pith and just include that.) Somebody did actually set the definitions on those things, and what variety it's made with is not relevant to the definition.

Ivan Viehoff
2010-Mar-15, 06:18 PM
I would say it is essential to make it with Seville (bitter) oranges.
There are other kinds of marmalade, from tangerine to lime. Blood orange marmalade, for example, can be rather wonderful but I'm not sure I'd want a whole batch of it in the cupboard. Then there's onion marmalade... You also need to avoid fruit that has been waxed to extend its shelf life, as is pretty standard treatment for dessert oranges here. But, in sum, navel oranges would be unlikely to make a very tasty marmalade.

BigDon
2010-Mar-19, 09:33 PM
Ivan, I gathered that on further reading. Especailly the part that said, " for best results don't use navel oranges." :)

My brother, who I share an apartment with, has one of those expensive extra fancy juicers. I just didn't want to clean the damn thing. One of those professional models that assume you have a professional staff to clean it.

I defaulted to that as that pre-smell of oranges going south had started setting in.

The juice was good though.

mugaliens
2010-Mar-20, 03:35 PM
Marmalade!