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View Full Version : Inquiring minds want to know.....



Drakheim
2004-Mar-10, 02:41 PM
White Dwarves (??) cool overtime and eventually black dwarves which = one hell of a diamond that I will never be able to afford for my sweeties ring. :lol:

Supergiant sun's death = Neutron Star, Pulsar or Black hole.

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Question part:

Neutron stars = big o'l lumps of iron that have collapsed into neutronium right?

And do those ever cool off over time like a white dwarf dose or would the gravity of the object prevent it from that?

(Main reason for the question was that if they ever do cool down, then there is about 10 lifetimes worth of iron ore by a conservative estimate there) :D

Hamlet
2004-Mar-10, 02:58 PM
White Dwarves (??) cool overtime and eventually black dwarves which = one hell of a diamond that I will never be able to afford for my sweeties ring. :lol:

Supergiant sun's death = Neutron Star, Pulsar or Black hole.

------------------------------------------

Question part:

Neutron stars = big o'l lumps of iron that have collapsed into neutronium right?

And do those ever cool off over time like a white dwarf dose or would the gravity of the object prevent it from that?

(Main reason for the question was that if they ever do cool down, then there is about 10 lifetimes worth of iron ore by a conservative estimate there) :D

Neutron stars should cool down via radiation, but this will take a very long time. Many of the neutrons in a neutron star come from the fusion of electrons and protons under the intense gravity. The core remnant is like a giant ball of neutrons so I don't think there would be anything resembling iron left.

Normandy6644
2004-Mar-10, 03:07 PM
Right, and to my understanding the large magnetic field generated by a neutron star is due to the rate at which it spins, thus moving whatever charge is inside and creating the field. I'm not 100% sure on that, but I think it's close.

Hamlet
2004-Mar-10, 03:24 PM
From what I understand, the magnetic field in a neutron star is the concentrated remains of the magnetic field from the original star. When the core collapses the magnetic field is compressed and becomes much stronger. Because of conservation of angular momentum the collapsed core rotates much faster than the original star. The fast spinning magnetic field can induce charge particles to emit electromagnetic radiation which we can detect here on Earth as a pulsar. The radiation from the neutron star is preferentailly emitted from near the magnetic poles, so for us to see it, we need to be in the line of sight with one of the pulsars magnetic poles.

Swift
2004-Mar-10, 09:39 PM
(Main reason for the question was that if they ever do cool down, then there is about 10 lifetimes worth of iron ore by a conservative estimate there) :D
I think drilling a hole to the Earth's core and tapping the iron would be easier than getting it off a neutron star. Gravity and spin would make your cargo ships launch just a little difficult. With all the hunks of iron in the asteroid belt, why would you want to do this?

Drakheim
2004-Mar-10, 09:44 PM
I think drilling a hole to the Earth's core and tapping the iron would be easier than getting it off a neutron star. Gravity and spin would make your cargo ships launch just a little difficult. With all the hunks of iron in the asteroid belt, why would you want to do this?

Because if the technology were ever available to mine a cool neutron star for iron, then that would mean that we have colonized other worlds and have found a way to travel faster than light (or a way around it) It would be a lot easier in that case to strip-mine a neutron star than our own solar system for colonization needs.

Brady Yoon
2004-Mar-11, 01:16 AM
Not a good idea. You'd be crushed flatter than a sheet of paper. If there were gravity resistant suits, maybe that would work, but unfortunately, they don't. I guess we have to settle for our own planet. :D

Astronot
2004-Mar-11, 02:12 AM
I think drilling a hole to the Earth's core and tapping the iron would be easier than getting it off a neutron star. Gravity and spin would make your cargo ships launch just a little difficult. With all the hunks of iron in the asteroid belt, why would you want to do this?

To avoid having to file an environmental impact statement, of course! :lol: