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View Full Version : Now that was just wierd



Larry Jacks
2010-Mar-15, 01:26 PM
A couple weeks ago, my wife's cellphone voicemail inbox started filling up with junk messages. She isn't allowed to use her cell phone at work so she turns it off. When we checked her inbox, it'd contain over 30 messages consisting of nothing but beeps with no indication of who was placing the calls. We'd empty the inbox but it'd keep filling up.

Yesterday, she happened to have the phone turned on. It rang several times but all we heard was the beeps, only this time we had the phone number. We eventually managed to get through to the caller. It was a Wal Mart pharmacy. They'd incorrectly had her cell phone listed as a fax contact number. When I explained the situation, they promised to delete her number right away.

Now for the wierd part - the phone number that was calling us used to belong to us. From 1986-1999, we had the same phone number. When we moved to a different part of town in late 1999, we had to get a different phone number. That Wal Mart pharmacy eventually was assigned our old phone number, and it was calling her new cell phone number.

What are the odds of that?

Fazor
2010-Mar-15, 01:33 PM
What are the odds of that?

To quote a much too cheesy line from the end of the CSI that got pushed back and thus recorded at the beginning of another one of our scheduled-to-record shows; "Since it happened? 100%"

sarongsong
2010-Mar-15, 08:02 PM
...Now for the wierd part...Other than the spelling :confused:

NEOWatcher
2010-Mar-15, 08:11 PM
What are the odds of that?
If the area was covered by one phone exchange? 10000:1
But Fazor's answer works too.

Larry Jacks
2010-Mar-15, 08:49 PM
Other than the spelling

One of the reasons I hate English grammer is that there are so many exceptions. "I before E except after C, or when pronounced as A as in neighbor or weigh." Except it doesn't work for weird, either. Besides, if all you can comment on is the spelling, you're really not adding anything to the conversation.

If the area was covered by one phone exchange? 10000:1

There are many, many exchanges in the metro area alone, much less the area code. Within the 719 area code, there are likely at least a million phone numbers when you count the land lines, cell phones, pagers, etc. The probability would not be 1 just because it happened.

kleindoofy
2010-Mar-15, 08:56 PM
... I hate English grammer ...
Ok, but what about English grammar? ;)

ShadowSot
2010-Mar-15, 09:27 PM
Heh.
We had a fellow who called in for tech support, and it took a little while over the phone to figure out the fellow was connecting to someone else' wireless connection.
It turned out the mac id for his modem, was the same as this persons passkey!

slang
2010-Mar-16, 12:56 AM
Heh.
We had a fellow who called in for tech support, and it took a little while over the phone to figure out the fellow was connecting to someone else' wireless connection.
It turned out the mac id for his modem, was the same as this persons passkey!

Wow... that is just a little bit beyond "whoops, might just happen". Was this investigated further? Did people share their passkey, or was a returned modem assigned to someone else?

sarongsong
2010-Mar-16, 01:01 AM
...f all you can comment on is the spelling, you're really not adding anything to the conversation...It's in the fingernails-on-blackboard title...

TheHalcyonYear
2010-Mar-16, 01:02 AM
Now for the wierd part - the phone number that was calling us used to belong to us. From 1986-1999, we had the same phone number. When we moved to a different part of town in late 1999, we had to get a different phone number. That Wal Mart pharmacy eventually was assigned our old phone number, and it was calling her new cell phone number.

What are the odds of that?
So vanishingly small as to be considered an argument for intelligent design. :whistle:

Tog
2010-Mar-16, 06:16 AM
I used to drive a green Neon. I worked at a grocery store at the time, and we had this old guy that used to come in 3 or 4 times a week that also drove a green neon.

I got there at around 3 AM at this time, and always got the same parking space. One day, there was someone in my spot, so I had to park a few spots over. When I left, I came out and got into the green neon in my space. I sat down and three things struck me.

1. My car was cleaner than I remember.
2. It smells like old man.
3. It was an automatic now.

I got out of the car, and looked on the other side of the white van beside it to find my car right where I'd left it.

A year or so before this, the old guy had told me that he had gotten into my car by mistake. I thought he was just confused (he told me the same story about once a week for a year and half, and the setting was always "yesterday"), or possibly that I hadn't locked it.

I counted the notches on the key, and as near as I can figure, any given Neon key would open 1 in every 256 cars. The ignition uses the same key as the door.

It was the odds that one of those 256 would be the same color as mine, with the same wheel covers, and parked in the same parking stall that I normally use, and was owned by a person I sort of knew, that struck me as odd.