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Buttercup
2010-Mar-16, 09:10 PM
Frosting flower power! (http://www.justinspace.com/screenpaper/10x7flowerjsbg.jpg)

I've decided to take cake decorating classes next month at my local Hobby Lobby. The package is 4 classes, 1 per week, each 2 hours in duration. My aunt learned to decorate cakes when I was a kid, and I've since wanted to learn.

Unfortunately I have a bit of carpal tunnel syndrome, so the constant squeezing of frosting in a tube onto a cake might prove a bit taxing. :confused:

Basically it's something to pass the time, chat with other ladies and hopefully make a new friend or two. Inexpensive too: Only $35.

Has anyone else here taken cake decorating classes? :)

Fazor
2010-Mar-16, 09:12 PM
Tara would be quite jealous. She's insistent that we could make awesome wedding cakes that rival those on all the tv shows. But every time we try, it turns out quite . . . interesting. Have fun, and bring back some tips!

Trebuchet
2010-Mar-16, 11:09 PM
See here for some hilarious examples of how not to do it:
Cake Wrecks (http://cakewrecks.blogspot.com/)

I think you can get electric powered piping tools to take the stress off your hands. Probably harder to do a good job though. I've had carpal tunnel for years so you have my sympathies on that one.

megrfl
2010-Mar-17, 01:54 PM
I haven't taken a cake decorating class, but I did see a demonstration using the Tupperware cake decorator. I bought it and I'm a satisfied customer. I also use it to fill deviled eggs.

Good luck with your classes. :)

jokergirl
2010-Mar-17, 02:20 PM
No, but I do demand pics of your creations!

;)

Buttercup
2010-Mar-17, 02:28 PM
Thanks megrfl.

:) Sorry jokergirl, but I'm not sure I'll post photos of cakes I've decorated. Frankly I don't expect to get much real-life practice; it's just the 2 of us and I'm watching my weight. :lol:

Fazor:
Tara would be quite jealous. She's insistent that we could make awesome wedding cakes that rival those on all the tv shows. But every time we try, it turns out quite . . . interesting. Have fun, and bring back some tips!

I'm not ambitious enough to try for a wedding cake. ;) Sure, I'll see what tips (pardon the pun) I might be able to share.

I just hope we won't be expected to work with rolled fondant. :( I want to stick with regular buttercream frosting.

Fazor
2010-Mar-17, 02:32 PM
We went to Hobby Lobby last night because I needed to pick up a sketch pad and some supplies (Tara wants me to illustrate a short story for my niece for her birthday, which is just a little over two weeks away. Yeah, that'll be fun).

Anyway, we were walking around like we always do at Hobby Lobby and saw the door to the "class room" was open slightly. We peeked in and, sure enough, they were decorating cakes.

I was wrong about Tara though; she wasn't even slightly interested. Apparently she doesn't care to do piping and frosting-flower type decorations. *Shrug* Good thing we're not on the 'Newly Wed' game. Of course, we're not newly wed either, so they'd disqualify us.

Parrothead
2010-Mar-17, 05:24 PM
Took a full year baking and pastry arts course. Shaky hands, I take my time with the little bit of decorating I do, try to stick to pastries. ;)

Buttercup
2010-Mar-17, 05:34 PM
Hi Fazor, I'm curious as to whether this local class will require we bake and bring our own cakes to decorate, or if we'll learn on styrofoam. :lol:

Parrothead, a full year? Sounds intensive. Pastries are something I've not tried my hand at, though I'd like to make kolaches sometime. They're Czech pastries; an egg-rich dough with an indentation in the middle filled with fruit jams and even canned poppyseed filling. My mother and aunts used to make them...yum.

Fazor
2010-Mar-17, 05:38 PM
They looked fake, but to be honest I didn't get a very good look.

Swift
2010-Mar-17, 06:27 PM
I've never taken a decorating class, but I have made a couple of themed cakes. One was way back when I was an EMT (Emergency Medical Technician). Our squad had an old post-office jeep that we converted into a first response vehicle. For the birthday of the fellow who was head of our squad (and for whom the jeep was a pet project), we made a cake replica of the jeep. It was basically a sort of box shape, covered in appropriately colored icing (white with an orange strip), a gum ball light on the roof, and Oreo cookies stuck on the side for wheels.

Another was for a going-away cake for a friend who was changing jobs, and the cake was a stylized road map of Cleveland, showing the way to her new job.

I'll see if I can find the prints (pre-digital camera) and scan them in.

I am also a huge fan of Ace of Cakes.

Parrothead
2010-Mar-17, 06:37 PM
The hardest for me was/is the fine work. Things like rosettes, etc are easy, decorating turntables are handy :) . Making flowers and other decorations from marzipan or fondant is pretty straight-forward. Making things out of pastillage was fun, but time consuming. Sugar work was fun too :) . Just before Christmas we made gingerbread chalets (it was hard not to munch on the sweets used for decorating them) ;) .

The course, 4 days a week. Baking lab from 7-11 am, then a variety of other courses including baking theory (the science behind baking and ingredients), business math, bakery management, health and diet, etc.

Buttercup
2010-Mar-17, 07:01 PM
Interesting, Parrothead. :) Alton Brown gives a lot of "the science behind baking and ingredients" on Good Eats. I'd like to make a gingerbread house sometime, but I would not have the patience.

Swift:
I am also a huge fan of Ace of Cakes.

To a point. Though I'll admit sometimes those cakes look like something out of Whoville [Dr. Seuss]. :confused: To have wildly clashing-color cakes which are set to have a tilt on each layer, and then squiggely rods with decorative balls on the ends... :shifty: For a kid's birthday maybe. But for a wedding? :rolleyes: No. But to each their own.

At one point my mother bought (and used) a little color-photo book on how to cut regular (round, square, rectangular) cakes and arrange them in the "shape" of a sailboat, giraffe, teddy bear, etc. It was published in the late 1960s and the designs were REALLY cute and clever. :) Included tips on frosting and tinting coconut. Decorations were licorice whips and etc.


Another was for a going-away cake for a friend who was changing jobs, and the cake was a stylized road map of Cleveland, showing the way to her new job.


Cool!

chrissy
2010-Mar-17, 07:02 PM
I learned how to ice cakes when I was at catering college many moons ago, as for decorating them I taught myself and decorated my wedding cake, I was quite proud of it too. Shame I wasted my talents on it...divorce and all, maybe I should have made a divorce cake and made an effigy of him with his head buried in the icing..:whistle:

Fazor
2010-Mar-17, 07:09 PM
I learned how to ice cakes when I was at catering college many moons ago, as for decorating them I taught myself and decorated my wedding cake, I was quite proud of it too. Shame I wasted my talents on it...divorce and all, maybe I should have made a divorce cake and made an effigy of him with his head buried in the icing..:whistle:

"This 'es supposed to be ah 'appy occasion! Let's not sit an' bicker about who diviorced who."