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tommac
2010-Mar-18, 06:31 PM
Does anyone know how to see ratings on Drs and hospitals?

For example, if I had a tumor ( i dont ) and wanted to go to the best hospital for my tumor, how would I go about researching this? Is there a list that ranks the best ones? There is defeinitely a difference between some of these hospitals and others but how can the lay person weed through all of the false promos.

For example one hospital near me states:


Deborah Physicians Earn Top Doc Honors
Several Regional Magazines Recognize Deborah Specialists

New Jersey Monthly Magazine, SJ Magazine, New Jersey Savvy Living Magazine, and South Jersey Magazine have recently all recognized Deborah’s physicians as among the best in the state.

So is this hospital really the best in the state? And if so ... what are they best in everything?


Also curious about this for individual Drs.

NEOWatcher
2010-Mar-18, 06:53 PM
Does anyone know how to see ratings on Drs and hospitals?
I've seen national rankings but not local ones.


For example one hospital near me states:
[...]
So is this hospital really the best in the state? And if so ... what are they best in everything?
They didn't even say best, they said "among the best". That means they could be farther down the list.

Talk to people. Some hospitals have excellent numbers but lousy service, some have excellent numbers because they are hard to get into.

And; of course it's going to depend on the speciality.

I recently used the services of one of the best (top 3) hospitals in the world. But; If it were for Cancer, I would rather go down the street a bit where they specialize a bit more for it.

tommac
2010-Mar-18, 06:55 PM
I've seen national rankings but not local ones.


They didn't even say best, they said "among the best". That means they could be farther down the list.

Talk to people. Some hospitals have excellent numbers but lousy service, some have excellent numbers because they are hard to get into.

And; of course it's going to depend on the speciality.

I recently used the services of one of the best (top 3) hospitals in the world. But; If it were for Cancer, I would rather go down the street a bit where they specialize a bit more for it.

Can you post the list that you are using?

NEOWatcher
2010-Mar-18, 07:55 PM
Can you post the list that you are using?
Like my suggestion, I'm not using a list, and more by word of mouth. I can almost do my own rankings for local hospitals based on horror stories that I hear.
I only mentioned lists, because every time I see one, the hospital is near the top.

kleindoofy
2010-Mar-18, 08:25 PM
How can one determine what is the best hospital to go to?

Park outside the back entrance for a few days.

The less hearses pull up, the better the hospital.

Trakar
2010-Mar-18, 08:33 PM
www.hospitalcompare.hhs.gov/ (www.hospitalcompare.hhs.gov/)


Welcome to Hospital Compare. In this tool you will find information on how well hospitals care for patients with certain medical conditions or surgical procedures, and results from a survey of patients about the quality of care they received during a recent hospital stay. This information will help you compare the quality of care hospitals provide. Talk to your doctor about this information to help you, your family and your friends make your best hospital care decisions.



Hospital Compare was created through the efforts of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), the Department of Health and Human Services, and other members of the Hospital Quality Alliance: Improving Care Through Information (HQA). The information on this website comes from hospitals that have agreed to submit quality information for Hospital Compare to make public.



The Veterans Health Administration (VA) is now providing information about the quality of care given in VA Medical Centers. The Veterans Health Administration's (VA's) medical benefits package is available to Veterans (including Reservists and National Guard) who served on active duty and meet eligibility requirements. Other groups can also be eligible. For more information, visit www.va.gov/healtheligibility.

Jens
2010-Mar-19, 12:00 AM
[B]
Park outside the back entrance for a few days.

The less hearses pull up, the better the hospital.

It's funny, but not really true. You probably see a lot of hearses coming out of trauma centers, but few from plastic surgery clinics. But that doesn't mean that if a person is involved in a major accident, you should take them to the plastic surgery clinic! :)

tommac
2010-Mar-19, 12:25 AM
www.hospitalcompare.hhs.gov/ (www.hospitalcompare.hhs.gov/)

The questions are more about customer service more than dr error and things like that ... these are the questions:

Percent of patients who reported that their nurses "Always" communicated well. 83% 72% 70%
Percent of patients who reported that their doctors "Always" communicated well. 84% 78% 75%
Percent of patients who reported that they "Always" received help as soon as they wanted. 72% 55% 53%
Percent of patients who reported that their pain was "Always" well controlled. 78% 69% 70%
Percent of patients who reported that staff "Always" explained about medicines before giving it to them. 64% 51% 53%
Percent of patients who reported that their room and bathroom were "Always" clean. 75% 69% 64%
Percent of patients who reported that the area around their room was "Always" quiet at night. 61% 50% 50%
Percent of patients at each hospital who reported that YES, they were given information about what to do during their recovery at home. 87% 78% 78%
Percent of patients who gave their hospital a rating of 9 or 10 on a scale from 0 (lowest) to 10 (highest). 82% 65% 63%
Percent of patients who reported YES, they would definitely recommend the hospital.

kleindoofy
2010-Mar-19, 12:44 AM
It's funny ...
Yeah, that was kind of the point. ;)


... few from plastic surgery clinics. ...
The OP asked for hospitals. In my personal opinion, plastic surgery clinics are not hospitals. They're chassis shops for the mentally ill (with the exception of deformed persons).

Actually, hearses are known to make deliveries to plastic surgery clinics. You know, like Melanie Griffith or Sylvester Stallone. ;)

GalaxyGal
2010-Mar-19, 01:46 AM
* Hospital Care (http://www.hospitalcompare.hhs.gov)
Hospital Compare
Use this tool from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to compare the quality of care hospitals provide.

* Health Grades (http://www.healthgrades.com)
See ratings for hospitals according to specialty, such as cardiac surgery, cardiology, orthopedic surgery, women’s health, and more.

* The Leapfrog Group (http://leapfroggroup.org)
Leapfrog gathers and reports information on hospital quality and patient safety. Make more informed decisions about where to receive hospital care by searching for hospitals in your area.

* UCompareHealthCare (http://www.ucomparehealthcare.com)
Browse quality and safety measures, check services provided, procedure volume, and more. Compare multiple hospitals on a variety of measures with the comparison report option.

* Hospitals Worldwide (http://www.hospitalsworldwide.com/)
Search through a database of worldwide hospitals to find contact details and websites.

* U.S. News & World Report (http://health.usnews.com/health/best-hospitals): Best Hospitals
View the online package for the magazine's latest "America's Best Hospitals" report.

* The Solucent 100 Top 100 Top Hospitals Reports (http://www.100tophospitals.com)
This national study identifies superior hospitals in 5 key areas. See how hospitals ranked in your state, purchase reports, and more.

tommac
2010-Mar-19, 03:23 AM
great info ... thanks ... a big help.


* Hospital Care (http://www.hospitalcompare.hhs.gov)
Hospital Compare
Use this tool from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to compare the quality of care hospitals provide.

* Health Grades (http://www.healthgrades.com)
See ratings for hospitals according to specialty, such as cardiac surgery, cardiology, orthopedic surgery, women’s health, and more.

* The Leapfrog Group (http://leapfroggroup.org)
Leapfrog gathers and reports information on hospital quality and patient safety. Make more informed decisions about where to receive hospital care by searching for hospitals in your area.

* UCompareHealthCare (http://www.ucomparehealthcare.com)
Browse quality and safety measures, check services provided, procedure volume, and more. Compare multiple hospitals on a variety of measures with the comparison report option.

* Hospitals Worldwide (http://www.hospitalsworldwide.com/)
Search through a database of worldwide hospitals to find contact details and websites.

* U.S. News & World Report (http://health.usnews.com/health/best-hospitals): Best Hospitals
View the online package for the magazine's latest "America's Best Hospitals" report.

* The Solucent 100 Top 100 Top Hospitals Reports (http://www.100tophospitals.com)
This national study identifies superior hospitals in 5 key areas. See how hospitals ranked in your state, purchase reports, and more.

Tom Servo
2010-Mar-19, 03:43 AM
Your satisfaction is going to depend largely on what you need to have done. And what your expectations are.

I work at a hospital on the northwest side of Houston. We get a bonus every 3 months if we meet the "Patient satisfaction quota". We give the patients questionaires to fill out and send back when they leave about their stay.

We usualy get the bonus every time. I think we have to be above 85% satisfaction or something like that.

Its really hard to trust people's reviews of hospitals on internet. Because, you have to keep in mind people who have had a bad experience are 100% more likely to feel the need to review something with negative reviews than someone with a good experience. Plus there is a certain percentage of the population who are shall we say "pain medication seeking". These people are generally imposible to please and will complain no matter what. Thus you will have a larger number of complaints vs compliments. If you do find a hospital that has generaly more compliments than complaints then chances are they are doing something right.

Here is a good way to find out if its good or not. Ask a nurse who works at that hospital if they would send their mother to that hospital. If they say of coarse they would, it's probably a good one. If they say ohh heck no, then its a good bet you should take your self somewhere else.

If your a famous person or have lots of wealth the Main Methodist Hospital in downtown Houston is famous for its VIP suites. After all President Bush sent his mother there, and she was very pleased with her stay.

tommac
2010-Mar-19, 04:27 AM
The us news and world report link is great ... it rates things like patient safety.


Your satisfaction is going to depend largely on what you need to have done. And what your expectations are.

I work at a hospital on the northwest side of Houston. We get a bonus every 3 months if we meet the "Patient satisfaction quota". We give the patients questionaires to fill out and send back when they leave about their stay.

We usualy get the bonus every time. I think we have to be above 85% satisfaction or something like that.

Its really hard to trust people's reviews of hospitals on internet. Because, you have to keep in mind people who have had a bad experience are 100% more likely to feel the need to review something with negative reviews than someone with a good experience. Plus there is a certain percentage of the population who are shall we say "pain medication seeking". These people are generally imposible to please and will complain no matter what. Thus you will have a larger number of complaints vs compliments. If you do find a hospital that has generaly more compliments than complaints then chances are they are doing something right.

Here is a good way to find out if its good or not. Ask a nurse who works at that hospital if they would send their mother to that hospital. If they say of coarse they would, it's probably a good one. If they say ohh heck no, then its a good bet you should take your self somewhere else.

If your a famous person or have lots of wealth the Main Methodist Hospital in downtown Houston is famous for its VIP suites. After all President Bush sent his mother there, and she was very pleased with her stay.

Tom Servo
2010-Mar-19, 06:33 AM
Hey cool theres my Hospital #20 on the list of best.

NEOWatcher
2010-Mar-19, 05:01 PM
great info ... thanks ... a big help.
<list of links>
Yes; it does make for good reference, but it also shows that you still need to do your research and compile the information for your own use.

My hospital appears in the top 5 on one national list, and not even in the top 100 on another. So there are definitely differences.

And, the government site seems to be more interested if the hospital follows guidelines rather than having good medicine.
For example:
Percent of hospitals that give drug "x" after procedure "a".
Well; if procedure "a" was done well enough, maybe drug "x" is no longer needed.
Or, being that it's a guideline that "a" is given, maybe the lower percent is actually looking at the effectiveness of the drug or monitoring the levels on an individual basis, while the other is just doing it because it's a good idea.

rommel543
2010-Mar-19, 05:27 PM
Don't forget to that it also depends on the doctor that you get as well. The Brandon Hospital that I went to as a child has/had a fairly good standing with doctors and nurses. The doctor that I got though when I had my accident almost caused me to loose both of my legs and had me addicted to Valium.

GalaxyGal
2010-Mar-19, 08:54 PM
Yes; it does make for good reference, but it also shows that you still need to do your research and compile the information for your own use.

Exactly. Unfortunately, consumers may not have the time, nor the expertise to conduct that research and analysis. As a healthcare quality and improvement geek, I'll confess my bias. Regardless of the politics, one area that is not as prominent as it could (and IMHO should) be in the healthcare reform debate is transparency of validated quality metrics.

If you can get quality, reliability, service and performance reports on a toaster, you deserve at least as much information on healthcare providers.

BigDon
2010-Mar-19, 09:42 PM
Exactly. Unfortunately, consumers may not have the time, nor the expertise to conduct that research and analysis. As a healthcare quality and improvement geek, I'll confess my bias. Regardless of the politics, one area that is not as prominent as it could (and IMHO should) be in the healthcare reform debate is transparency of validated quality metrics.

If you can get quality, reliability, service and performance reports on a toaster, you deserve at least as much information on healthcare providers.

Toasters do one thing and are made to engineering standards.

Doctors are human beings. Not a service. That's why you don't have a "right" to health care.

Some doctors lose patients because they take on hopeless trauma and cancer cases, and save more and more of them every year because of the experience. But still lose over half their patients.

swampyankee
2010-Mar-19, 10:29 PM
Does anyone know how to see ratings on Drs and hospitals?

For example, if I had a tumor ( i dont ) and wanted to go to the best hospital for my tumor, how would I go about researching this? Is there a list that ranks the best ones? There is defeinitely a difference between some of these hospitals and others but how can the lay person weed through all of the false promos.

For example one hospital near me states:



So is this hospital really the best in the state? And if so ... what are they best in everything?


Also curious about this for individual Drs.

The best way? Get friendly with with a number of nurses who work in area hospitals, especially those in (for your non-existent tumor), oncology. Find out which doctors are good -- frequently more important than which hospital -- and go from there.

BigDon
2010-Mar-19, 11:40 PM
Hey Swamp, that answer was so obvious I presumed he couldn't for some reason.

Hell yeah, that's the absolute, but informal, first choice.

The nurses know who the hacks and butchers are, as well as the heros.

I have an aunt who is a retired surgical nurse, my friend Ol' weird Bob's girlfriend is a retired surgical nurse, and my kid sister is a RN.

You can't help but know who all the Frank Burns' are.

Tommac, please don't read more smart "alec"ness into this than I intend, but if you're really worried find out where the local hospital staff go to unwind, buy drinks and eaves drop.

If you're single, start dating a nurse or shoot, even a doctor.

I know they come in "female" too. Saw one mostly naked once when I got lost late at night during an extended stay and entered one of those sleeping rooms via the back door. Caught her in mid-undress.

I thought she was very understanding about it. Though if you are an advanced hepatitis case dragging a wheeled IV tree around, it's really hard to appear threatening, even to half naked women who don't know you. :lol:

GalaxyGal
2010-Mar-20, 12:56 AM
Toasters do one thing and are made to engineering standards.

Doctors are human beings. Not a service. That's why you don't have a "right" to health care.
Okay, a toaster is probably not the best analogy. However, while healthcare isn't a product, we define ourselves as a service. As a service, our network's mission is to take care of the health of the community, it's the right thing to do....and it's also good from a fiscal standpoint. So how are we doing? If you look at the map of county health ratings for PA (http://www.countyhealthrankings.org/pennsylvania)*, you’ll see a large block of the healthiest counties are located in eastern PA(in white). Those are the areas my network serves.

*The County Health Rankings (http://www.countyhealthrankings.org)—the first set of reports to rank the overall health of every county in all 50 states includes snapshots of U.S. counties with a color-coded map that compares each county’s overall health with other counties in each of the 50 states.


Some doctors lose patients because they take on hopeless trauma and cancer cases, and save more and more of them every year because of the experience. But still lose over half their patients.

True, but that doesn't mean we can't reliably measure quality and outcomes. As a Level I trauma center, my health network takes the toughest cases on the sickest patients. Mortality metrics for conditions are weighted for acuity and complexity.

There are standard industry metrics on quality and performance that are not currently available to the public. The hospital compare site from HHS is a start, but it hasn't gone far enough....and certainly not fast enough. Health and Human Services has advocated for transparency for quite some time.

"Every American should have access to a full range of information about the quality and cost of their health care options."

Patients should be able to readily find out who are the good and bad hospitals, doctors and nursing homes based on established healthcare standards. Most states require hospitals and surgical centers to report serious medical errors and avoidable complications, but only aggregated statewide figures are available to the public. Certainly asking a nurse or two is helpful, but when we already have validated statistics on performance, that should also be available to the public.

tommac
2010-Mar-20, 01:00 AM
I would like to see stats like ... how many successful surgeries vs unsuccessful. How many malpractice suits, how many accidental deaths or unexpected deaths, how many staff infections caught in the hospital

GalaxyGal
2010-Mar-20, 01:19 AM
Exactly. You may also be interested in these established metrics:

Surgical care - includes the care you receive before, during and after a procedure. It ranges from the measures hospitals take to help you prevent infection to the steps they take to keep you from experiencing complications from your surgery. Each hospital is scored along these practices

Patient Safety
Death among patients with a non-serious diagnosis
Foreign object left inside patient during procedure
Patient falls
Broken hip following surgery
Post-operative blood clots
Post-operative blood infection
Surgical incision re-opens
Accidental cut or injury
Reaction to receiving blood

Hospital Readmission Rates - Readmission is when a patient who has had a recent stay in the hospital goes back into a hospital again for treatment within 30 days. These readmission rates demonstrate how well a hospital helps a patient prevent complications and transition out of the hospital to the home or another setting.

BigDon
2010-Mar-20, 02:38 AM
.

I deserved that reply because I was replying to a second argument going on on my side of the monitor, concurrent to me posting that reply. Hence the bit of non sequiter.

Having to do with whether doctors have a right to not do various procedures I won't name here. A doctor is not a slave to be ordered. A goverment shouldn't be ordering him to do squat save in time of war or if he transgresses. They're human beings with their own wants, beliefs and opinions. Lately the United States has had a big bunch of "not seeing that". Your rights end where the doctor's rights begin. (The argument I was having then, not with you!) Nobody has to be a doctor, and doctors quit practicing all the time.

And don't get me started on things like the goverment setting doctor's saleries! A gem from the lastest bill. That's even stupider than trying to cap sports figures saleries. Doctors do a service to society beyond entertainment. (Memo from the Stating The Obvious Dept, sorry.)

Well, my LAN warfare friends have arrived in time to save us all from the rest of my rant, myself included.

Sorry Tommac, didn't mean to rant on. What were we talking about again? :)


Have a nice weekend everybody.

GalaxyGal
2010-Mar-20, 03:23 AM
BD,

No harm, no foul. I enjoy a vigorous exchange or (ahem) healthy debate...one of the reasons I'm drawn to BAUT. Thanks for providing additional context.

We're in agreement about physicians, how they should be regarded and, I suspect, the pending reform bill.

Sunday is the vote on Healthcare Reform....but in the interest of staying within the bounds of the forum rules, I'll resist the temptation to provide further comment.

sarongsong
2010-Mar-21, 03:29 AM
I would like to see stats like ... how many successful surgeries vs unsuccessful...Maintenance inspection reports.

Jens
2010-Mar-22, 12:58 PM
Actually, hearses are known to make deliveries to plastic surgery clinics. You know, like Melanie Griffith or Sylvester Stallone. ;)

No I don't actually. I know something of Sylvester Stallone (from Rocky). But who is Melanie Griffith? Did she die in plastic surgery?

suntrack2
2010-Mar-23, 05:16 PM
(+) I think cleanliness and smart treatment with low cost would be the best option to undertake the treatments. if anything any hospital lagging on any count then the rating of the hospital may decline, the superspeciallity hospitals today are looking a maintained all good things to adopt for their patients.

JohnD
2010-Mar-23, 09:00 PM
An interesting thrread, and one that illustrates a great divide betwen UK and US medical practice. In the UK, all people (note, not "All patients") may apply to be cared for by a "General Practitioner" who is a similar doctor to the US "Family Doctor". The GP is not an employee of the NHS, but may, individually or in a group, have contracts with the NHS to provide that care, which will be extensive, detailed ansd where required, long-term.
If a GP's patient needs specialist care, then they will usually ask the GP's advice on what hospital to go to. Recent changes in the NHS have widened the choice to include 'private' (Non-NHS) hospitals.
The Wiki includes an article on "General Practioners", that details what this means in very many countries, and the differences. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_practitioner

I mention this as an example of how usefully a skilled doctor can advise the patient, using their knowledge rather than the rather desperate search as above for information to make the choice. It may be that the new US Healthcare statute jast passed by Congress will increase the number of similar Family Doctors who can help in this way. My newspaper predicts so!

John

PetersCreek
2010-Mar-24, 08:44 PM
This is a general and gentle warning to all: watch the political entanglements...carefully. In fact, since they have little-to-nothing to do with the OP, there's really no reason to mention them at all.

GalaxyGal
2010-Mar-25, 12:16 AM
If a GP's patient needs specialist care, then they will usually ask the GP's advice on what hospital to go to. .......
I mention this as an example of how usefully a skilled doctor can advise the patient, using their knowledge rather than the rather desperate search as above for information to make the choice.

John

Patients in the US still rely primarily on their physicians to recommend a hospital. However, consumers are asking more questions now. Activated and informed patients are beneficial for improving all aspects of care.

Primary care physicians (PCP) are making inroads in the introduction of the concept of a patient centered medical home. (http://fmignet.aafp.org/online/fmig/index/family-medicine/pcmh.html) We've found that when there is a tight connection between the coordinating physician and the hospital, especially for patients with chronic conditions, the quality of care for the patient is better. One study showed that hospital readmission rates were 20% lower for patients with a medical home.

So what's the connection to hospital quality? We're finding that physicians operating as a patient-centered medical home are helping our hospitals identify ways to improve the handoff of information between the facility and the practice; identifying gaps in care and/or lack of coordination amongst specialists; and reducing medication reconciliation errors between the multiple providers who may be caring for the patient (both inpatient and outpatient). All of this leads to better hospital care, lower length of hospital stays, lower readmission rates and most importantly - better patient outcomes.

tommac
2010-Mar-25, 01:31 AM
It is scary because the doctors now seem like the scam artists at car dealerships. They tell you that you absolutely need A,B,C, D ... when you probably only need an oil change.


Patients in the US still rely primarily on their physicians to recommend a hospital. However, consumers are asking more questions now. Activated and informed patients are beneficial for improving all aspects of care.

Primary care physicians (PCP) are making inroads in the introduction of the concept of a patient centered medical home. (http://fmignet.aafp.org/online/fmig/index/family-medicine/pcmh.html) We've found that when there is a tight connection between the coordinating physician and the hospital, especially for patients with chronic conditions, the quality of care for the patient is better. One study showed that hospital readmission rates were 20% lower for patients with a medical home.

So what's the connection to hospital quality? We're finding that physicians operating as a patient-centered medical home are helping our hospitals identify ways to improve the handoff of information between the facility and the practice; identifying gaps in care and/or lack of coordination amongst specialists; and reducing medication reconciliation errors between the multiple providers who may be caring for the patient (both inpatient and outpatient). All of this leads to better hospital care, lower length of hospital stays, lower readmission rates and most importantly - better patient outcomes.

BigDon
2010-Mar-25, 02:19 AM
It is scary because the doctors now seem like the scam artists at car dealerships. They tell you that you absolutely need A,B,C, D ... when you probably only need an oil change.

OR they just don't want to see you again 15 years down the road with your colon about to prolapse entirely and blood pressure high enough to squirt blood out of your eyes. :) Ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure... remember that one?

Dude, I can get on a doctor rant like nobody's business. I've had a seizure disorder since 82. But only in cases of hyperbole and **'ing. Way too many good doctorss fixed me way too many times. Fixed the spring, wound me back up, patted me on the head and sent me back on my way.

I know a man that had his four fingers on the left sewed back on after a wee mishap with a chainsaw, with barely any scarring and full sensation returned. *I* can't do that. People at Kaiser Hospital San Francisco can.

GalaxyGal
2010-Mar-25, 11:44 AM
They tell you that you absolutely need A,B,C, D ... when you probably only need an oil change.
Tommac,

When your physician recommends tests or treatments that don't make sense, ask questions. Health and Human Services, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality has resources to help patients formulate questions and become more active in their care.

Questions are the answer (http://www.ahrq.gov/questionsaretheanswer/)

Here's one of the television ads (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0PudB0uYnFU). It's catchy, but the underlying message is important - get actively involved in your care. You literally have skin in the game.

They have a few 15 sec spots demonstrating how many questions we ask before ordering a meal in a restaurant or purchasing a cell phone versus the headshake we give our clinicians. You can find the streaming video here. (http://www.ahrq.gov/questionsaretheanswer/level2col_1.asp?nav=2colNav00&content=09_0_videos)

Cougar
2010-Mar-27, 04:36 AM
An interesting thread, and one that illustrates a great divide between UK and US medical practice. In the UK, all people (note, not "All patients") may apply to be cared for by a "General Practitioner" who is a similar doctor to the US "Family Doctor".

Well, in the US we also call them GPs. And I guess lots of people have them. Apparently quite a few more people are going to get them. Still, a lot of people won't have one.


If a GP's patient needs specialist care, then they will usually ask the GP's advice on what hospital to go to....

Usually it's going to be the GP saying, "You better see a specialist," or "You better have this done," and recommend two or three doctors or surgeons.

And then I imagine the surgeon is associated with a hospital or contracts with one.... You want a well-equipped hospital, in case your surgeon cuts the wrong thing. :doh:

And a good measure of the likelihood your surgeon will not cut the wrong thing is how many times he or she has performed the procedure on other patients before. Of course, it's a high likelihood of success to begin with, but it gets even better.

Cougar
2010-Mar-27, 05:24 AM
...we define ourselves as a service.

It's great what you're doing, GalaxyGal.


There are standard industry metrics on quality and performance that are not currently available to the public.

That's for sure. Very closely guarded. But what result are we seeking? Get rid of the lower ranking hospitals? Because they'd likely be going "out of business" if all hospitals had quality stamps with all their performance metrics. It's a tough question....

GalaxyGal
2010-Mar-27, 11:25 AM
But what result are we seeking? Get rid of the lower ranking hospitals? Because they'd likely be going "out of business" if all hospitals had quality stamps with all their performance metrics. It's a tough question....

We are working to rid hospitals of lower rankings (by improving them)....but not rid ourselves of hospitals. Having more hospitals close their doors is bad for the health of the community.

When we focus on the bottom line at the expense of quality, both suffer. (Not to beat a dead Camry, but a lesson Toyota relearned recently). Transparency (which is being phased in) redirects the attention to the original purpose of hospitals - patient care. So is stopping payment for 'misadventures' in care.

These are referred to as "Never Events"...as they should never, ever happen to a patient while under the care of a hospital. Changing the reimbursement to exclude payment for these errors has redirected attention towards understanding the underlying processes and systems that can lead to a "Never Event." That's a key step towards preventing them....and improving overall care.

Here's a list of "Never Events" that are no longer paid for....the expenses associated with the error or the correction (within the same facility).

Hospital Acquired Conditions

Surgical Events
Surgery on wrong body part
Surgery on wrong patient
Wrong surgery on a patient
Foreign object left in patient after surgery
Post-operative death in normal health patient
Implantation of wrong egg

Product or Device Events
Death/disability associated with use of contaminated drugs
Death/disability associated with use of device other than as intended
Death/disability associated with intravascular air embolism

Patient Protection Events
Infant discharged to wrong person
Death/disability due to patient elopement

Care Management Events
Death/disability associated with medication error
Death/disability associated with incompatible blood
Maternal death/disability with low risk delivery
Death/disability associated with hypoglycemia
Death/disability associated with hyperbilirubinemia in neonates
Stage 3 or 4 pressure ulcers after admission
Death/disability due to spinal manipulative therapy

Environment Events
Death/disability associated with electric shock
Incident due to wrong oxygen or other gas
Death/disability associated with a burn incurred within facility
Death/disability associated with a fall within facility
Death/disability associated with use of restraints within facility

Criminal Events
Impersonating a heath care provider (i.e., physician, nurse)
Abduction of a patient
Sexual assault of a patient within or on facility grounds
Death/disability resulting from physical assault within or on facility grounds