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NEOWatcher
2010-Mar-29, 04:59 PM
Happy meal has it's first birthday (http://consumerist.com/2010/03/this-1-year-old-happy-meal-has-aged-surprisingly-well.html)



NOPE, no worries at all. My Happy Meal is one year old today and it looks pretty good. It NEVER smelled bad. The food did NOT decompose. It did NOT get moldy, at all.


I've been seeing this all over the news and keep thinking "well, how dry are the surroundings?"

The link to this "nutritionist's" site (http://www.babybites.info/2010/03/03/1-year-happy-meal/) says it.


Because Colorado has an arid climate, over the year the moisture has been slowly pulled from the Happy Meal.

So; she knows the moisture has been pulled out, but doesn't understand that mold and rot require moisture too. And that's what the ants and flies are attracted to.

She then goes on...

Food is broken down into itís essential nutrients in our bodies and turned into fuel. Our children grow strong bodies, when they eat real food. Flies ignore a Happy Meal and microbes donít decompose it, then your childís body canít properly metabolize it either.
Tells me she doesn't understand how the body processes food.

Something tells me she's out for the buck on the book, and knows nothing about nutrition.

Now; I'm not saying that a happy meal is healthy. Far from it. Just that her reasoning is extremely flawed.

slang
2010-Mar-29, 05:01 PM
Where's the control group?

NEOWatcher
2010-Mar-29, 05:25 PM
Where's the control group?
Everywhere... The group has about 47 million per day. ;)

Swift
2010-Mar-29, 05:33 PM
After a couple of days, flies deposited their larvae (maggots) in the meat. When I would lift the lid, I would see the recently hatched maggots wiggling on the putrid mess. A fly never bothered to land on the tiny hamburger patty on my office shelf.

Food is broken down into itís essential nutrients in our bodies and turned into fuel. Our children grow strong bodies, when they eat real food. Flies ignore a Happy Meal and microbes donít decompose it, then your childís body canít properly metabolize it either. Now you know why itís called ďjunk food.Ē

I think ants, mice and flies are smarter than people, because they werenít fooled. They never touched the Happy Meal. Children shouldnít either.

So, if flies like it, your children should eat it? Considering some of the things I've seen flies on, remind me not to go to dinner at her house.:sick:

(and yes, before someone points out that "If A Then B" doesn't mean "If not A Then Not B" - I'm making a joke)

TrAI
2010-Mar-29, 05:45 PM
Hmmm... That experiment sounds a bit dry, yes...


Where's the control group?

I expect someone ate them...

SeanF
2010-Mar-29, 06:06 PM
Honey doesn't spoil or rot, either, so I guess it's bad for us?

Gillianren
2010-Mar-29, 06:07 PM
This is not entirely comparable, but honey doesn't decompose, either.

Fazor
2010-Mar-29, 06:20 PM
Eh, whatever. I'd still eat a McDonalds hamburger. And it makes me feel better about the fact that I'd still eat one after it's been left in a bag in the microwave overnight . . . not that I ever have :whistle:

I just think it's a stupid 'experiment' and worse 'conclusion' to say "Look! Even mold and bugs didn't touch it! It must be bad for you!"

Jeff Root
2010-Mar-29, 06:43 PM
Honey doesn't spoil or rot, either, ...
It's weird that you brought that up, because just a few hours ago I made
a peanut butter and honey sandwich, and at my first taste of the honey
I wondered if it had changed in some way while sitting in the container,
because it tasted so strong. Sort of an exaggerated honey taste. Not
in a pleasant way.

Maybe my taste/smell receptors were just overly sensitive until after
that first taste, at which time they adjusted, so that the rest tasted
fairly normal.

A couple of months ago I suggested to my mom that she throw out a
bottle of honey that just looked old (because it was very dark), and
which she said she'd had for quite some time.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Jeff Root
2010-Mar-29, 06:49 PM
Gillian,

Your comment was only one minute after Sean's. Did you read his before
posting yours, or did you bring up honey independently?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Swift
2010-Mar-29, 06:52 PM
It's weird that you brought that up, because just a few hours ago I made
a peanut butter and honey sandwich, and at my first taste of the honey
I wondered if it had changed in some way while sitting in the container,
because it tasted so strong. Sort of an exaggerated honey taste. Not
in a pleasant way.

Honey can change over time, it just doesn't spoil.

Many times I've seen the sugar in honey crystallize out of it. If you warm up the honey (~80C) the sugar will redisolve and the honey is fine.

I suppose you could also have a situation where some of the moisture evaporates out of it and concentrates what is left - maybe that's what happened with yours.

Gillianren
2010-Mar-29, 06:53 PM
Independently. It's something I've known for years. It has such a low moisture content that, as pointed out above, things which attack other foodstuffs won't or can't touch honey. (I believe its acidity plays a role, but I'd have to re-watch the Good Eats episode or look it up elsewhere.) In fact, very old honey indeed has been consumed in a sort of scientific vein and been found edible. The fact that yours seemed stronger might have had something to do with what water there is having somewhat evaporated, leaving the sugar.

SkepticJ
2010-Mar-29, 06:59 PM
Now all we need to know is does McDonalds food submerged in honey decompose?

Gillianren
2010-Mar-29, 07:09 PM
No. That's why Alexander the Great's body was preserved in it.

mike alexander
2010-Mar-29, 07:13 PM
He always was a sweetie.

Fazor
2010-Mar-29, 07:35 PM
Salt is a preservative. The sodium content in fast food is quite high. I wonder if that has anything to do with it. Come to think of it, I've never seen moldy potato chips or saltine crackers either.

From my experience, a lot of spicy foods won't mold or attract pests either [edit: or maybe just take much longer to do so. I don't tend to leave food out for a year on purpose]. I don't think it's the spice, so much as they tend to also have a lot of vinegar [and other acid], thus are highly acidic.

mike alexander
2010-Mar-29, 07:40 PM
I've found old french fries under car seats, probably years old, with no sign of rot or even mold. Tasted pretty good, too.

sarongsong
2010-Mar-29, 10:09 PM
What's any of this to do with jerky (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerky_)food)) :confused:

PetersCreek
2010-Mar-29, 10:30 PM
I let several pounds of ground pork sit in a warm (85įF) oven for several hours, then put in an old refrigerator at 60įF and ~70% RH for 48 days. I even mixed some microbes in with it and sprayed it down with a mold culture. I guess my body can't digest dried salami, either.

SkepticJ
2010-Mar-30, 01:22 AM
No. That's why Alexander the Great's body was preserved in it.

Sweet. I'm going to be preserved in a borosilicate glass tube full of honey, then.

HenrikOlsen
2010-Mar-30, 08:09 AM
The link to this "nutritionist's" site (http://www.babybites.info/2010/03/03/1-year-happy-meal/) says it.
To paraphrase Dara ” Briain (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VIaV8swc-fo): nutritionist isn't a protected term and anyone can call themselves nutritionist, the legally protected term is dietician.
Dietician is like dentist, nutritionist is like ... toothiologist.

mugaliens
2010-Mar-30, 08:31 AM
I routinely eat food here in Colorado that's older than a year!

But it's been canned, properly jerked, in MRE form, or simply frozen.

NEOWatcher
2010-Apr-01, 06:10 PM
What's any of this to do with jerky (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerky_)food)) :confused:
Your link is broke. It should be this (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerky_(food)).

Anyway, it's dried up and shrivelled. Maybe not all can be called jerky, but the hamburger could qualify especially given the descriptions in the link.


... or is occasionally just salted and sun-dried.
Sounds applicable here.


There are many products in the marketplace which are sold as jerky which consist of highly processed, chopped and formed meat, rather than traditional sliced, whole-muscle meat. These artificial products, with their higher fat and water content, often include chemical preservatives to prevent spoilage.
Sounds like a good analogy of how people view that particular chain's meat.

rommel543
2010-Apr-01, 07:28 PM
Maybe call it a McJerky instead.

So I know that peanut butter won't mold either because of the lack of moisture but it will go rancid because of the oil. Will honey ever do something similar or will it just crystallize and slowly become a hard sugary substance.

Gillianren
2010-Apr-01, 08:06 PM
There's no oil in honey. Just sugar and water, basically. No rancidity is possible.