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View Full Version : Can anyone identify this alt-med thingy?



Kebsis
2010-Apr-02, 09:34 PM
Sorry I can't be more descriptive. Here's the story: a friend of mine told me yesterday that he had gone to some doctor for a physical, and that he had gone to this particular doctor because he didn't take insurance and just wanted fifty bucks for a visit. He said that the 'doctor' asked him to put his hand on what he described as looking like an elongated computer mouse, which 'read his vitals' and printed up a list of his iron, magnesium, potassium levels and the like, along with 'brainwave levels' and some other such stuff. Of course, it was around then that I asked him if the guy he had seen was an actual doctor or just some alternative medicine type guy, and I guess you probably already know the answer to that one. I strongly suggested that he see an actual physician for a physical.

Anyway, my question is simply whether or not anyone here has ever heard of that thing he put his hand on that supposedly read his vitals.

Thanks.

Moose
2010-Apr-02, 09:45 PM
Not sure, but he definitely got ripped off. Mall concourses have machines that do that, and those only charge fifty cents.

Seriously, I've never heard of that one, and that's unusual. I had a look on Quackwatch (your fount of knowledge for all things (s)CAM) and found this (http://www.quackwatch.org/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/electro.html). The thingy used on your friend was probably some variant of the EAV.

Kebsis
2010-Apr-02, 09:54 PM
Hmm, thanks. He also mentioned that the guy took a pinprick of blood from him and put it under a microscope, claiming that he could tell from what the blood looked like whether he had any one of several diseases, including lung cancer.

HenrikOlsen
2010-Apr-02, 10:06 PM
That's a serious fraudster.

Did he call himself a doctor? In that case there may be criminal charges possible, for impersonating a medical professional.
He's definitely been scammed off his $50.

Kebsis
2010-Apr-02, 10:19 PM
Well, when my friend started telling me about his visit, he was referring to the guy as a doctor. But when I asked him about it, he was aware that the guy was not an actual doctor, so I'm assuming he did not advertise himself as such (even if he didn't do anything to dissuade the idea; I would actually be very surprised if he wasn't wearing a white lab coat and stethoscope).

LotusExcelle
2010-Apr-02, 10:46 PM
Wait people that are sick *really* go to people they know aren't doctors for *Medical Treatment*??? I think I better rethink my retirement plan. I could make soe money on the side with all the oscilloscopes I have.

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Apr-02, 11:04 PM
Hmm, thanks. He also mentioned that the guy took a pinprick of blood from him and put it under a microscope, claiming that he could tell from what the blood looked like whether he had any one of several diseases, including lung cancer.

I think this is the procedure with the blood you are talking about.
http://www.quackwatch.org/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/Tests/livecell.html

TrAI
2010-Apr-04, 02:59 AM
Sorry I can't be more descriptive. Here's the story: a friend of mine told me yesterday that he had gone to some doctor for a physical, and that he had gone to this particular doctor because he didn't take insurance and just wanted fifty bucks for a visit. He said that the 'doctor' asked him to put his hand on what he described as looking like an elongated computer mouse, which 'read his vitals' and printed up a list of his iron, magnesium, potassium levels and the like, along with 'brainwave levels' and some other such stuff. Of course, it was around then that I asked him if the guy he had seen was an actual doctor or just some alternative medicine type guy, and I guess you probably already know the answer to that one. I strongly suggested that he see an actual physician for a physical.

Anyway, my question is simply whether or not anyone here has ever heard of that thing he put his hand on that supposedly read his vitals.

Thanks.

Sounds like one of those quantum medicine or bio-energy informational devices or what ever they call it.

A quick look around the net unearthed a couple of examples that looks mouse-like: the Nutri-Energetics Systems NES (http://www.nutrienergetics.com/practitioner-scanning.html) and the ZYTO Pro (http://www.zyto.com/Products/Pro.aspx).

Of course, those sites will hype the things, after all, they are trying to sell them, so remember to wear your protective skeptic goggles.

JustAFriend
2010-Apr-05, 07:38 PM
Way back in the '60s the old Jack Webb "Dragnet" series did a show on a similar scam.

Nothing new, kids....

Kebsis
2010-Apr-10, 05:15 PM
Sounds like one of those quantum medicine or bio-energy informational devices or what ever they call it.

A quick look around the net unearthed a couple of examples that looks mouse-like: the Nutri-Energetics Systems NES (http://www.nutrienergetics.com/practitioner-scanning.html) and the ZYTO Pro (http://www.zyto.com/Products/Pro.aspx).

Of course, those sites will hype the things, after all, they are trying to sell them, so remember to wear your protective skeptic goggles.

Thanks everyone. Using the info you and the others here provided, I managed to show my friend what was up with this stuff. He didn't seem very happy about it, but he understands now that he got ripped off. Normally I'm conflicted about pointing out my friend's woo, but in this case it seemed like he was using this stuff instead of getting an actual physical, which could turn out bad.

He's actually not an unreasonable guy. It's just that his mother is really deep into the alt medicine/spiritual healing type stuff, so he was raised with it and doesn't tend to question it unless it's pointed out to him.

mugaliens
2010-Apr-11, 08:47 AM
Sounds flighty by nighty to me.