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NEOWatcher
2010-Apr-08, 05:21 PM
Is this story even worth noting? (at least outside the scientific community)
Small asteroid to zip near Earth on Thursday (http://www.wkyc.com/news/local/news_article.aspx?storyid=133923&catid=45)


...shortly after 4 p.m. PDT.
At the time of its closest pass, the 71-foot-wide space rock will be 223,000 miles away from Earth. That's about 16,000 miles closer than the moon.

Swift
2010-Apr-08, 08:26 PM
Well, UT (Fraser) (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php/102809-Newly-Discovered-Asteroid-Will-Pass-by-Earth-April-8) thought it worth noting. Actuallly, I think it is kind of neat that the TV station did.

NEOWatcher
2010-Apr-08, 08:34 PM
... Actuallly, I think it is kind of neat that the TV station did.
I guess I can agree with that, since space stuff normally doesn't get the news.

I'm actually surprized they didn't say something like "grazing by" the earth.

I did find on NASA's site about this asteroid, that these happen somewhere around once ever 2 weeks.

Swift
2010-Apr-08, 08:44 PM
Well, there is the old "slow news day" explanation.

01101001
2010-Apr-08, 11:36 PM
Well, UT (Fraser) (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php/102809-Newly-Discovered-Asteroid-Will-Pass-by-Earth-April-8) thought it worth noting.


"Fly bys of near-Earth objects within the moon's orbit occur every few weeks," said Don Yeomans of NASA's Near-Earth Object Office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif.

So, the discovery is news, but its close passing is one of many more-than-a-dozen-times-a-year events.

neilzero
2010-Apr-09, 02:36 PM
The specifics are interesting (223,000 kilometers and 71 meters wide, and repeat very rarely) Most are farther and smaller, I think. 71 meters may be optimum as the small dimension is perhaps 32 meters, which allows a 15 meter tunnel to a mass center habitat, 4 meters in diameter. Smaller means inadequate radiation protection in the habitat. Larger may mean the tunnel making fails before the mass center is reached. Off center increases the probability that the air escaping the habitat, will disassemble the asteroid, eventually. Neil

NEOWatcher
2010-Apr-09, 02:46 PM
The specifics are interesting (223,000 kilometers and 71 meters wide, and repeat very rarely) Most are farther and smaller, I think.
Maybe most are, but that doesn't mean it's rare.
Per Nasa (http://www.nasa.gov/topics/solarsystem/features/neo20100406.html):

"Fly bys of near-Earth objects within the moon's orbit occur every few weeks," said Don Yeomans of NASA's Near-Earth Object Office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif.
Although; they don't mention size.


71 meters may be optimum as the small dimension is perhaps 32 meters, which allows a 15 meter tunnel to a mass center habitat, 4 meters in diameter. Smaller means inadequate radiation protection in the habitat. Larger may mean the tunnel making fails before the mass center is reached. Off center increases the probability that the air escaping the habitat, will disassemble the asteroid, eventually. Neil
I need an introduction to this statement. Are you talking about using the asteroid as a means of conveyence of some kind?

neilzero
2010-Apr-09, 04:05 PM
Yes, conveyance. While a 4 meter habitat is not comfortable for you and your children, nor does it inspire the tax payer, it is a cheap method for establishing a human presence throughout the inner solar system = these asteroid are are more than 150 million kilometers from Earth about half of the time between close approaches a few times per century. Best of all, we can do this before the end of this decade, while Moon or Mars are likely 20 plus years in our future.

max8166
2010-Apr-09, 05:50 PM
Trouble is they won't slow down for you to hitch a ride, it'd kinda be like hitch-hiking on a motorway (free way) by jumping out in front of a car and expecting a free ride. Hey these guys have no brakes!

theregoesanotherone
2010-Apr-11, 04:58 PM
did 2010 ga6 get detected by LIGO

mugaliens
2010-Apr-14, 02:39 AM
Smaller means inadequate radiation protection in the habitat. Larger may mean the tunnel making fails before the mass center is reached. Off center increases the probability that the air escaping the habitat, will disassemble the asteroid, eventually. Neil

I like Bigelow Aerospace's approach using inflatable habitats better. Probably a lot cheaper than trying to drill an asteroid.