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RAMS57
2010-Apr-09, 01:02 AM
Spending more time on the HST-Deep Field view and studying more the details in the infrared as well as registered gamma, what is this thing out at about 1.1 billion LYs that is drawing everything in our quadrant of the universe toward it at .2 SoL, (14 million miles per hour)? Astrophyiscists have no other defintion for such a thing, and have simply called it, officially, The Great Attractor, which lies out past the Centaurus Supercluster.

Postulations welcome.

Thank you in advance,

Robert

Robert A.M. Stephens, LLC
Scaled Dynamics
NASA Visual Exploration
Pan America
USA
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Have Jeep, Have Heart, Will Travel

Cougar
2010-Apr-09, 01:44 PM
...what is this thing out at about 1.1 billion LYs that is drawing everything in our quadrant of the universe toward it at .2 SoL, (14 million miles per hour)?

Actually, 14 million mph = .02088 of the speed of light. I'm not sure how accurate this figure is, but wiki says the latest estimate puts it at about a quarter of a billion LY (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Attractor) distant. It's hard to tell exactly what makes it up because our own galaxy obscures the view. If we wait about 50 million years, we ought to be able to see it better. :razz: It's apparently a very massive supercluster.

max8166
2010-Apr-09, 01:57 PM
IMO we should consider spacetime to be curved and so i would assume The Great Attractor *wiki link* (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Attractor) is a dense area of spacetime curved around a small portion of the Universe which gravitationally affects the area around it.

tommac
2010-Apr-09, 09:23 PM
Sorry for a slight additional question, but would there be a way to determine if there are 2 points of "great attraction"? or just the one?

RAMS57
2010-Apr-09, 10:03 PM
Sorry for a slight additional question, but would there be a way to determine if there are 2 points of "great attraction"? or just the one?

Excellent response. So far, we know that there are perhaps 3 Great Attractors in the known universe. They are a undefined gravity region, unknown in modern physics and for sheer size and influence do not fit a black hole definition per se. Since the universe is expanding at SoL, it is also logical to assume that whatever this is, it defies time-place as well. Thus, they may very be some sort of vector outside the dimensional realm of our own place, but this is another conjecture.

Robert

Hornblower
2010-Apr-10, 01:04 AM
Sorry for a slight additional question, but would there be a way to determine if there are 2 points of "great attraction"? or just the one?

How about 3 or 4 or 100 or 1000 or more, meaning galaxies in a large supercluster, hidden by dust in our own galaxy.

DrRocket
2010-Apr-10, 01:26 AM
http://www.bartcop.com/marilyn-monroe002.jpg

slang
2010-Apr-10, 12:56 PM
would there be a way to determine if there are 2 points of "great attraction"?


The Great Attractor
http://www.bartcop.com/marilyn-monroe002.jpg

I see at least two.

DrRocket
2010-Apr-10, 11:22 PM
I see at least two.

I saw two in the photo.

RAMS57
2010-Apr-10, 11:33 PM
Dr. Rocket, so did I. It defies all parameters indeed. Perhaps a binary system.