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EFossa
2004-Mar-15, 07:07 PM
Any idea when Opportunity will leave the crater its been in for the last 50 sols and head out across the plain?

Manchurian Taikonaut
2004-Mar-15, 07:18 PM
another 25 days I seen wrote about this plan, so maybe after 3-4 weeks

EFossa
2004-Mar-15, 07:42 PM
another 25 days I seen wrote about this plan, so maybe after 3-4 weeks

Wow! really? Oportunity will have spent most of it's life in this tiny crater then. :(

ToSeek
2004-Mar-15, 08:44 PM
No, at the March 11 press conference they said another 10-12 sols.

yaohua2000
2004-Mar-16, 11:37 AM
Animation of Mars arrival of Opportunity made by myself. :D

I wrote a program and spent hours to download http://mars1.jpl.nasa.gov/mgs/realtime/mera1.jpg again and again in January...

http://www.oier.org.cn/opportunity.gif

ToSeek
2004-Mar-16, 04:41 PM
Cool video! - well done.

Opportunity update (http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/status.html#opportunity) - to leave outcrop tomorrow, then take five soil surveys before leaving the crater for good.

Manchurian Taikonaut
2004-Mar-17, 01:01 AM
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/rear_hazcam/2004-03-16/1R132726221EFF06A8P1312L0M1.JPG

it looks like it's on the move already!

ToSeek
2004-Mar-17, 02:10 AM
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/rear_hazcam/2004-03-16/1R132726221EFF06A8P1312L0M1.JPG

it looks like it's on the move already!

Boy, it's left a mess of tracks over by the outcrop, hasn't it?

ToSeek
2004-Mar-22, 04:27 PM
Latest update (http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/status.html#opportunity): Tried to leave the crater on sol 56, but couldn't. Will try another route today.

EFossa
2004-Mar-22, 04:31 PM
lets hope it makes it this time lol.

..........on the other side of the planet, whats up with Spirit? Its sol 78 and they haven't had an update since Sol 74 8-[

Amadeus
2004-Mar-22, 04:55 PM
lets hope it makes it this time lol.

..........on the other side of the planet, whats up with Spirit? Its sol 78 and they haven't had an update since Sol 74 8-[

Give NASA time. It takes a while to airbush those images! :D

aurora
2004-Mar-22, 10:23 PM
Opportunity slipped trying to get out of the crater:

CNN story (http://www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/space/03/22/mars.crater.ap/index.html)

Space.com story (http://www.space.com/missionlaunches/opportunity_slips_040322.html)

Hope they make it on the next try!

Swift
2004-Mar-22, 10:56 PM
Dang, I thought you put the chains on! So much for 6-wheel drive.

EFossa
2004-Mar-22, 11:17 PM
Its out of the crater, and what a view :o :o :o

http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/navcam/2004-03-22/1N133252969EFF0800P1907L0M1.JPG

ToSeek
2004-Mar-22, 11:39 PM
Looking back. (http://marsrovers.nasa.gov/gallery/all/1/n/057/1N133253519EFF0800P1907L0M1.HTML)

harlequin
2004-Mar-23, 01:44 AM
Sand--lots and lots of sand--and... (http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/navcam/2004-03-22/1N133252828EFF0800P1907R0M1.JPG)

In the linked image there is an object near the right side of the image (in the border area between the brigher and darker areas) and maybe about a third of the way down from the top. It is part of the backshell or something else NASA littered with.

jt-3d
2004-Mar-23, 01:47 AM
There's also something near the horizon, left of center. I know the route I'd take if I was driving.

01101001
2004-Mar-23, 02:13 AM
This shows a pair of tiny depressions on the left:

http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/all/1/n/057/1N133253122EFF0800P1907R0M1.HTML

Could the light-colored material in the bottom be exposed bedrock, same as seen in the Eagle crater outcrop? Could the soil of the plains be a very shallow layer, the more durable hematitic-concretion remains of that same bedrock eroded?

Ian Goddard
2004-Mar-23, 02:28 AM
The rocks Opportunity has been examining in the crater might prove to be the highlight of the mission. I think they're the only bedrock either rover has found. The surroundings outside the crater look (http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/navcam/2004-03-22/1N133252969EFF0800P1907L0M1.JPG) pretty bleak to me. Let's hope there's something out there. Has anyone found regional satellite imagery for Opportunity's landing site?

ToSeek
2004-Mar-23, 02:48 AM
The rocks Opportunity has been examining in the crater might prove to be the highlight of the mission. I think they're the only bedrock either rover has found. The surroundings outside the crater look (http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/navcam/2004-03-22/1N133252969EFF0800P1907L0M1.JPG) pretty bleak to me. Let's hope there's something out there. Has anyone found regional satellite imagery for Opportunity's landing site?

Opportunity is heading for the crater seen on the horizon here. (http://marsrovers.nasa.gov/gallery/all/1/n/057/1N133252792EFF0800P1907L0M1.HTML) (And I wouldn't be surprised if they stop at that mattress-shaped rock along the way.) If they finish there, there's some interesting stuff to the south, but it's several kilometers away, so it would be quite an accomplishment if they made it that far.

The best landing site views seem to be the MOC ones here, (http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/2004/02/09/) with the crater that's the next target toward the right-hand edge. There are plenty of images of the landing ellipse area, (http://marsoweb.nas.nasa.gov/landingsites/mer2003/mocs/region08.html) taken before the landing, but unfortunately Opportunity did not land in an area covered by any of them.

Ian Goddard
2004-Mar-23, 03:31 AM
Opportunity is heading for the crater seen on the horizon here. (http://marsrovers.nasa.gov/gallery/all/1/n/057/1N133252792EFF0800P1907L0M1.HTML) (And I wouldn't be surprised if they stop at that mattress-shaped rock along the way.)
Do you think it looks like some bounce marks right around that rock? There seem to be three roughly circular areas of lighter sand, one around the rock (or could the "rock" be the heat shield?). Opp probably bounced around before ending up in the crater. Maybe hitting that rock torn some airbag-cloth that would eventually be shed and rise to interplanetary stardom as the infamous Mr Bunny. :)

Thanks for the links!

Manchurian Taikonaut
2004-Mar-23, 06:09 AM
time to Exit the crater and head for hills? (http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/rear_hazcam/2004-03-22/1R133251842EFF0708P1301L0M1.JPG)

Anthrage
2004-Mar-23, 08:06 AM
Apparently, the rover is stuck - the egress did not work, and they are going to have to try something else.

Maksutov
2004-Mar-23, 08:55 AM
The rocks Opportunity has been examining in the crater might prove to be the highlight of the mission. I think they're the only bedrock either rover has found. The surroundings outside the crater look (http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/navcam/2004-03-22/1N133252969EFF0800P1907L0M1.JPG) pretty bleak to me. Let's hope there's something out there. Has anyone found regional satellite imagery for Opportunity's landing site?

Opportunity is heading for the crater seen on the horizon here. (http://marsrovers.nasa.gov/gallery/all/1/n/057/1N133252792EFF0800P1907L0M1.HTML) (And I wouldn't be surprised if they stop at that mattress-shaped rock along the way.) If they finish there, there's some interesting stuff to the south, but it's several kilometers away, so it would be quite an accomplishment if they made it that far.
[edit]


Well, if it's mattress-shaped, it would HAVE to be bedrock! :)

Let's go!

snabald
2004-Mar-23, 02:04 PM
I'm no expert but judging from the tracks that "sand" is very fine powdery stuff!

ToSeek
2004-Mar-23, 02:33 PM
Apparently, the rover is stuck - the egress did not work, and they are going to have to try something else.

Not any more - Opportunity is now nine meters outside the crater it landed in. (http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/status.html#opportunity)

Ian Goddard
2004-Mar-24, 04:13 AM
Do you think it looks like some bounce marks right around that rock? There seem to be three roughly circular areas of lighter sand, one around the rock (or could the "rock" be the heat shield?). Opp probably bounced around before ending up in the crater. Maybe hitting that rock torn some airbag-cloth that would eventually be shed and rise to interplanetary stardom as the infamous Mr Bunny. :)
Yeah, I think you're right. 8)

Here is (http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/all/1/n/056/1N133164482EFF0700P1705R0M1.JPG) the same area and "rock" seen from another angle and I believe that you can see a series of air-bag-bounce imprints in the distance that lead up to the crater edge in the immediate foreground, and the indicated bounce-path passes over the rock. I wonder if that rock is the heat shield, which should have fallen faster than the airbags such that it may have hit the ground first and the bouncing bags came along and bounced on it, perhaps resulting in the afore-said superstar.

George
2004-Mar-24, 05:13 AM
Opportunity is now nine meters outside the crater it landed in. (http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/status.html#opportunity)

You are real "ToSeek" aren't you? I mean your not some sort of NASA A.I. coming up with all the stuff that you do??? #-o :wink: :)

I do appreciate your work. Thanks. Great stuff!!

01101001
2004-Mar-24, 06:07 AM
By the measured bounce path shown in http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA05227, Opportunity had calmed down and begun a bit of a roll, but then resumed bouncing, bouncing 5 or 6 times before entering Eagle Crater. Maybe it hit that big rock and kicked itself up into the air.

On the other hand, a rolling tetrahedron probably isn't the most predictable of objects.

Anthrage
2004-Mar-24, 07:27 AM
On the other hand, a rolling tetrahedron probably isn't the most predictable of objects.

"You can say that again!" says my level 43 dwarf unhappily...

(I know, I just couldn't resist)

JohnOwens
2004-Mar-24, 09:49 AM
On the other hand, a rolling tetrahedron probably isn't the most predictable of objects.

"You can say that again!" says my level 43 dwarf unhappily...

(I know, I just couldn't resist)
http://monsters4u3.com/gifs/rofl.gif :lol: http://monsters4u3.com/gifs/rofl.gif :lol: http://monsters4u3.com/gifs/rofl.gif

Swift
2004-Mar-24, 01:57 PM
On the other hand, a rolling tetrahedron probably isn't the most predictable of objects.

"You can say that again!" says my level 43 dwarf unhappily...

(I know, I just couldn't resist)
I guess that means Beagle didn't make it's save roll.

ToSeek
2004-Mar-24, 02:58 PM
Opportunity is now nine meters outside the crater it landed in. (http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/status.html#opportunity)

You are real "ToSeek" aren't you? I mean your not some sort of NASA A.I. coming up with all the stuff that you do??? #-o :wink: :)

I do appreciate your work. Thanks. Great stuff!!

No, I'm flesh and bloo#64#20 - oops, ignore that bit. Passed my Turing Test and everything. Glad to be of service.

diddidit
2004-Mar-24, 03:18 PM
How far can Opportunity drive each day? Given the terrain (or lack thereof), it seems like an easy drive to the big crater, with no rocks to worry about (or distract anyone). Can they get 100 meters per sol?

did

Ian Goddard
2004-Mar-24, 03:30 PM
By the measured bounce path shown in http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA05227, Opportunity had calmed down and begun a bit of a roll, but then resumed bouncing, bouncing 5 or 6 times before entering Eagle Crater. Maybe it hit that big rock and kicked itself up into the air.
Cool link! Yeah, maybe rolling into that rock (or the already-landed heat shield) kicked it up into bouncing again. One might assume that had it not started bouncing again it would not have ended up in the crater, which was such a neat place to find oneself!

Someone here questioned the view that Mr Bunny is torn airbag fabric by observing that the territory is uniformly sandy, and thus one would assume too soft to tear fabric. But hitting that rock might have been a mechanism that induced tears in the fabric. And if that rock is the heat shield as I suspect it may be, then it might have sharp edges more likely to tear fabric than smoother weathered rocks.

ToSeek
2004-Mar-24, 03:52 PM
Do you think it looks like some bounce marks right around that rock? There seem to be three roughly circular areas of lighter sand, one around the rock (or could the "rock" be the heat shield?). Opp probably bounced around before ending up in the crater. Maybe hitting that rock torn some airbag-cloth that would eventually be shed and rise to interplanetary stardom as the infamous Mr Bunny. :)
Yeah, I think you're right. 8)

Here is (http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/all/1/n/056/1N133164482EFF0700P1705R0M1.JPG) the same area and "rock" seen from another angle and I believe that you can see a series of air-bag-bounce imprints in the distance that lead up to the crater edge in the immediate foreground, and the indicated bounce-path passes over the rock. I wonder if that rock is the heat shield, which should have fallen faster than the airbags such that it may have hit the ground first and the bouncing bags came along and bounced on it, perhaps resulting in the afore-said superstar.

The heat shield is farther away than that (http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/2004/02/09/), south of the crater they're heading for.

They mentioned at a press conference that there was one crater in the area, and they landed in it, and one rock in the area, that they bounced on. I would be very surprised if Opportunity doesn't check out that rock before heading for Endurance Crater.

Jack Higgins
2004-Mar-24, 03:53 PM
Cool link! Yeah, maybe rolling into that rock (or the already-landed heat shield) kicked it up into bouncing again.
It's not a part of the heat shield, it's just the only rock for miles & miles & miles...

If you check out the MOC images here: http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/2004/02/09/ you'll see that the heat shield landed well south of Endurance crater (the big one) whereas that rock is right next to Eagle crater, where Opportunity landed.

While talking about MOC images... Anyone know when the next chance to image either of the rovers from orbit will be?

ToSeek
2004-Mar-24, 03:54 PM
How far can Opportunity drive each day? Given the terrain (or lack thereof), it seems like an easy drive to the big crater, with no rocks to worry about (or distract anyone). Can they get 100 meters per sol?

did

The rover's top mechanical speed is 180 meters per hour, so I think they could do 100 meters/sol easily on terrain where they're not worried about running or falling into anything.

Tranquility
2004-Mar-24, 04:22 PM
Opportunity on the shore of possible evaoprated sea?

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/opportunity_sea_040323.html

I have 2 questions though. If Mars is colder than Earth how would an entire sea evaporate? Mars's atmosphere definitely would not be able to support a powerful enough greenhouse effect to evaporate the water. Wouldnt this sea instead be frozen?

Second thing, why is Hoagland jumping up and down about this? I dont think hes the first to come up with the idea of Martian water in the past right? Why is he so excited, claiming it has confirmed his Martian tidal force theory?

Sorry if these questions are mundane or stupid, but i genuinely dont know the answers

:-?

Ian Goddard
2004-Mar-24, 05:03 PM
The heat shield is farther away than that (http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/2004/02/09/), south of the crater they're heading for.

They mentioned at a press conference that there was one crater in the area, and they landed in it, and one rock in the area, that they bounced on. I would be very surprised if Opportunity doesn't check out that rock before heading for Endurance Crater.
Thanks, and to Jack. I assume Endurance is the large crater in the image. Let's hope it also has exposed bedrock. I've noticed in other images that the upper rims of craters can have what appears to be exposed bedrock. It may be that in areas where the wind blows sand over surfaces, right at the rim of a crater the wind may tend to blow sand off the surface probably due to the angle of inclination at the rim.

Ian Goddard
2004-Mar-24, 05:23 PM
If Mars is colder than Earth how would an entire sea evaporate? Mars's atmosphere definitely would not be able to support a powerful enough greenhouse effect to evaporate the water. Wouldnt this sea instead be frozen?
It's the low atmospheric pressure on Mars that causes liquid water to rapidly evaporate. But that pressure was not as low in the past. It is believed that heavy asteroid impacts over time slowly stripped away the once denser atmosphere of Mars (a process known as impact erosion). There is still frozen water on Mars, but I don't know where the trillions of gallons that once comprised massive bodies of water would have gone. The thinner atmosphere would also facilitate photo-disassociation of water molecules into their atomic components, which might account for the disappearance of most water.

See here (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?p=194803#194803) for some research abstracts on the question of liquid water on Mars today.

ToSeek
2004-Mar-24, 05:32 PM
Here is (http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/all/1/n/056/1N133164482EFF0700P1705R0M1.JPG) the same area and "rock" seen from another angle and I believe that you can see a series of air-bag-bounce imprints in the distance that lead up to the crater edge in the immediate foreground, and the indicated bounce-path passes over the rock. I wonder if that rock is the heat shield, which should have fallen faster than the airbags such that it may have hit the ground first and the bouncing bags came along and bounced on it, perhaps resulting in the afore-said superstar.

Upon looking at that image closely, I see a small dark speck almost on the horizon behind and to the left of the closer, mattress-like rock. Perhaps that is the heat shield, since that's about where it would be.

Swift
2004-Mar-24, 06:04 PM
If Mars is colder than Earth how would an entire sea evaporate? Mars's atmosphere definitely would not be able to support a powerful enough greenhouse effect to evaporate the water. Wouldnt this sea instead be frozen?
It's the low atmospheric pressure on Mars that causes liquid water to rapidly evaporate. But that pressure was not as low in the past....
I would agree. At Mar's air pressure (about 6 millibar, compared to 1000 millibar on Earth) and temperature, even ice will have a small, but non-zero vapor pressure. Given millions of years, you would still lose a lot of water. I suspect that even the ice in Mar's poles will one day disappear completely.

Tranquility
2004-Mar-25, 07:31 AM
Thanks guys. I apologize again for my ignorance :)

ToSeek
2004-Mar-30, 07:56 PM
(And I wouldn't be surprised if they stop at that mattress-shaped rock along the way.)

Told you so! (http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/status.html#opportunity)


The rover is currently at the rock dubbed "Bounce." Opportunity met this rock once before; while still cloaked in its protective lander and airbags, the rover bounced on the rock while on its way to a safe landing in "Eagle Crater." Miniature thermal emission spectrometer observations have shown Bounce is rich in hematite. In the coming sols, the rover's other spectrometers will examine the rock before the rock abrasion tool grinds into a designated target.

ToSeek
2004-Apr-15, 05:33 PM
Sunday driver!

Opportunity runs over Bounce rock (http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/all/opportunity_r070.html) (see first two images)

(Actually they did this on purpose to see if the rock would hold together.)

ToSeek
2004-Apr-17, 04:50 PM
Opportunity: Our travels thus far (http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/pancam/2004-04-16/1P135373381EFF10CGP2424R1M1.JPG) (pancam image looking back)

ToSeek
2004-Apr-17, 09:08 PM
Sol 81/82 mission status: (http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/status.html#opportunity) Opportunity goes a record 140 meters in 3 hours, now within 90 meters of Fram Crater.

PeteB
2004-Apr-17, 09:34 PM
Holy cow! Thanks for the link. I wasn't sure that there would be any updates on the weekend. I wonder if there will be any Pancams of Endurance from the location now. Hopefully tomorrow morning. Its nice to sit here with a couple of mugs of coffee and Kalua and rummage through the Exploratorium files. :D

ToSeek
2004-Apr-19, 08:10 PM
Finally some new photos:

looking ahead (http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/navcam/2004-04-19/1N135651739EFF1400P1981R0M1.JPG) (arrived at Fram?)

and looking back (http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/pancam/2004-04-19/1P135559477EFF1200P2431L7M1.JPG)

jt-3d
2004-Apr-20, 06:52 AM
That's a cool crater. I'd like to see that one colorised.

frogesque
2004-Apr-20, 07:16 AM
Are there any overhead views of Fram taken from ESA's HRSC?

Edit: Found This (http://www.esa.int/export/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEMYD457ESD_1.html#subhead1) which includes Gusev crater and Sprit's landing site.

Kullat Nunu
2004-Apr-20, 09:15 AM
Are there any overhead views of Fram taken from ESA's HRSC?

Isn't it way too small? Fram is hardly visible in the MOC image (http://marsprogram.jpl.nasa.gov/mgs/msss/camera/images/2004/02/09/01_R1400021sub.gif) (*, and MOC has better resolution than HRSC.

*) Is it that white-rayed dot about two-thirds from Eagle to Endurance crater (10 o'clock from Endurance)?

slinted
2004-Apr-20, 01:20 PM
Isn't it way too small? Fram is hardly visible in the MOC image (http://marsprogram.jpl.nasa.gov/mgs/msss/camera/images/2004/02/09/01_R1400021sub.gif) (*, and MOC has better resolution than HRSC.

*) Is it that white-rayed dot about two-thirds from Eagle to Endurance crater (10 o'clock from Endurance)?

I think it might be the one you pointed out, which is better visible from the descent camera images:
http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/press/opportunity/20040408a/12-RA-04-anatoliamap-B074R1.jpg

ToSeek
2004-Apr-24, 02:02 AM
Endurance is nigh (finally some Pancam images!):

http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/pancam/2004-04-23/1P136001041EFF1500P2438R1M1.JPG

http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/pancam/2004-04-23/1P136001066EFF1500P2438R1M1.JPG

George
2004-Apr-24, 04:36 AM
Wow, ToSeek! =D>

Looks like it's having a good day down at the beach. :)

EFossa
2004-Apr-24, 08:26 AM
Thank goodness for the exploratorium wesbite , JPL still havent updated theirs yet. Still showing sol 105 for spirit and 85 for opportunity.

ToSeek
2004-Apr-24, 12:48 PM
Thank goodness for the exploratorium wesbite , JPL still havent updated theirs yet. Still showing sol 105 for spirit and 85 for opportunity.

The Exploratorium kept adding images throughout the afternoon and evening - whenever I checked back, there were more. Haven't checked this morning yet, though.

ToSeek
2004-Apr-24, 10:48 PM
Thank goodness for the exploratorium wesbite , JPL still havent updated theirs yet. Still showing sol 105 for spirit and 85 for opportunity.

The JPL website is now up to sol 108 for Spirit with 748 (!) new images. Still nothing since sol 85 for Opportunity. So what are our tax dollars going for here!? ;)

Kullat Nunu
2004-Apr-26, 07:03 AM
The JPL website is now up to sol 108 for Spirit with 748 (!) new images. Still nothing since sol 85 for Opportunity. So what are our tax dollars going for here!? ;)

Opportunity pictures added up to Sol 88, with 591 new photos.

ToSeek
2004-Apr-26, 07:44 PM
The Exploratorium has new images for Opportunity (and Spirit) as of today.

ToSeek
2004-Apr-27, 05:01 PM
EFossa has noted that the Flight director's updates (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/mer2004/flight-director/index.cfm) currently have the latest information. For Opportunity as of Monday:

- 40 meters from Fram
- 170 meters from Endurance
- Should be at Endurance in "next day or two"

Keep an eye on those Exploratorium images!

CJSF
2004-Apr-27, 06:13 PM
EFossa has noted that the Flight director's updates (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/mer2004/flight-director/index.cfm) currently have the latest information.!

Which is a bummer to those of us who don't have ready access to video on their computers. I wish they'd do a transcript or something.

Come to think of it, aren't they in violation of the law that way? Aren't all NASA sites supposed to be Bobby Compliant (http://www.access-board.gov/sec508/508standards.htm)?

CJSF

ToSeek
2004-Apr-27, 06:25 PM
EFossa has noted that the Flight director's updates (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/mer2004/flight-director/index.cfm) currently have the latest information.!

Which is a bummer to those of us who don't have ready access to video on their computers. I wish they'd do a transcript or something.



I covered the high spots. It's a pretty brief clip.

harlequin
2004-Apr-27, 06:47 PM
Come to think of it, aren't they in violation of the law that way? Aren't all NASA sites supposed to be Bobby Compliant (http://www.access-board.gov/sec508/508standards.htm)?


It might not be practical to transcribe conferences, etc. since that would require a lot of time and money.

But actually, I have long noticed that NASA and other government
sites are not exactly compliant with Bobby though I tend to judge from the W3C rules rather than the the rules of section 508 of the federal rules which are a bit harder. (One of the W3C rules which NASA would really flunk on is having "more >>" links going to different URLs which violates the same link text always going to the same URL rule.)

I actually ran Bobby on the Mars Rover Homepage. It passes ALL the automatic checks which makes it better than the vast majority of sites on the web. As for the manual checks, it clearly violates what you mention (no transcript for audio). It also appears to violate "Make sure there is a link to download accessible plugins." There are other manual checks which would require some investigating that is not worth my while to check which also need checking.

But lets give NASA some credit. They are clearly trying. Complying with the whole range accessiblity rules can be VERY difficult. Still I would encourage those with web sites to use Bobby's validator to see how their sites comply with standards for accessibity for those with disabilities.

http://bobby.watchfire.com/bobby/html/en/index.jsp

And of course don't forget that valid HTML and CSS is a must:

http://validator.w3.org

ToSeek
2004-Apr-27, 06:53 PM
Still I would encourage those with web sites to use Bobby's validator to see how their sites comply with standards for accessibity for those with disabilities.

http://bobby.watchfire.com/bobby/html/en/index.jsp

And of course don't forget that valid HTML and CSS is a must:

http://validator.w3.org

Yes, I'm taking some Web classes now. It's quite an experience to see what doesn't pass muster and then figure out how to fix it (particularly since one of my classes is "strict" HTML rather than "transitional").

ToSeek
2004-Apr-27, 08:12 PM
Mission status update (http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/status_opportunityAll.html#sol88)


On Opportunity's 88th sol, which ended at 6:12 p.m. PDT on April 23, the rover team decided that although "Fram Crater" was an intriguing depression, the potential hazards and the time involved in investigating it made it more of a tour stop than a destination.

harlequin
2004-Apr-27, 09:22 PM
Still I would encourage those with web sites to use Bobby's validator to see how their sites comply with standards for accessibity for those with disabilities.

http://bobby.watchfire.com/bobby/html/en/index.jsp

And of course don't forget that valid HTML and CSS is a must:

http://validator.w3.org

Yes, I'm taking some Web classes now. It's quite an experience to see what doesn't pass muster and then figure out how to fix it (particularly since one of my classes is "strict" HTML rather than "transitional").

It takes some practice. But after a bit, it is not too bad especially if you use HTML tidy and use some sort of template. Most of strict's rules do make sense once you see what it is trying to do. My biggest grip about strict is it deprecates the target attribute. This in practice forces the unnecessary use of javascript to replace it which I don't exactly see as a very bright idea.

RBG
2004-Apr-27, 10:37 PM
Just for heck, I performed that Validator check on the BA home page & it shows 90 errors. I wouldn't want that thing anywhere near my web site. ;^)

RBG

ToSeek
2004-Apr-28, 12:22 AM
Just for heck, I performed that Validator check on the BA home page & it shows 90 errors. I wouldn't want that thing anywhere near my web site. ;^)


Yes, but it looks as if you fixed two problems, that would correct at least 70 of the errors.

ToSeek
2004-Apr-29, 01:44 AM
The Flight Director's Report (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/mer2004/flight-director/index.cfm) has been updated the past two days. Latest on Opportunity:

About 100 meters left to go to Endurance, plan on covering 60-70 meters of that in the current sol, all in a "blind" drive.

They're starting to make more use of the top data rate relays with the Mars orbiters, which is helping them to keep up with the data despite having less time to do so.

selvaarchi
2018-Apr-21, 12:02 PM
This is an old post of Opportunity where ToSeek was very active:) - created in March 2004!!!. Resurrection it after 14 years of deep sleep to tell the story of how Opportunity took its selfie for its 5000 Sols on Mars.

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/guest-blogs/2018/20180420-opportunity-selfie-5000.html


In late February, NASA's Opportunity rover captured its first-ever selfie to commemorate 5,000 sols on Mars. It was a yet another incredible achievement for the 14-year-old spacecraft, which was designed to last just 90 sols. This is the story of how that selfie came to be.

The story begins back in September 2007 (1288 sols into the 90-sol mission), when the Opportunity rover used its microscopic imager to inspect the mirror inside the Mini-TES instrument. Data had suggested there might be something wrong with it, but by reaching the rover's robotic arm up in front and turning the microscope toward the top of the mast, 12 images proved that the mirror was behaving fine and the anomalous data was the result of Martian dust sticking to the mirror.

The MER Microscopic Imager was of course designed to look closely at rocks and soils from a 60mm standoff, and is fixed focus. Staring into the rover's own mast the images were very much out of focus, but they were enough to see the outline of the Mini-TES mirror inside its housing.