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Tuckerfan
2004-Mar-21, 07:25 PM
This was the forerunner of the MMU which has been used a couple of times by shuttle astronauts. In poking around on the internet, I've found what appears to be two different designs for the the AME. One looks like this
http://www.astronautix.com/graphics/0/10076222.jpg

The other looks like this
http://www.friends-partners.org/partners/mwade/graphics/0/10076346.jpg
It looks to me like both units are quite different from one another, and I can't find anything which states that NASA tested two different designs on Skylab and the one in the second image is the most common design I've seen for the AME. So what's the reason for the different appearances of the units? Are they in fact the same unit, but one image shows the unit with "bolt on" attachments which were only used during the first tests? If so, what were the attachments?

If they're not the same unit, then why did NASA switch designs?

Tuckerfan
2004-Apr-01, 04:01 AM
Anyone? Anyone at all? Bueller?

ToSeek
2004-Apr-01, 05:50 PM
The first one is not an AME but an AMU. (http://www.friends-partners.org/partners/mwade/craft/skyabamu.htm)


One of several extravehicular mobility devices tested by the Skylab astronauts within the spacious station.

Tuckerfan
2004-Apr-01, 06:51 PM
The first one is not an AME but an AMU. (http://www.friends-partners.org/partners/mwade/craft/skyabamu.htm)


One of several extravehicular mobility devices tested by the Skylab astronauts within the spacious station.Didja see the caption under the photo?
Skylab 3 - Astronaut Alan Bean flies the Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment

ToSeek
2004-Apr-01, 09:30 PM
I think that's an erroneous caption and that these are two different pieces of equipment. See this article: (http://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/9727/86860)


During the Skylab program (1973-1974) the EMU was ready once again for another test in space. Versions of the EMU called the AMU and AME were used within the large area of the Skylab space station. Specially modified for safe use in the large station, it proved capable of allowing an astronaut to move with precision in weightlessness.