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View Full Version : How about 20-180x100 astronomical binoculars?



liehtyy
2010-Jun-02, 07:24 AM
I'm always thinking that I should buy astronomical binoculars for my grandpa, he is 70 years old and he like observing the sky in his lifetime. He walked a little inconvenience, so he stayed at home most of the time. It is so boring. Today I have feel time to search on the internet and wish to find an ideal astronomical binoculars for my grandpa. I like the Eyeskey 20-180X100 from the pictures. Does anybody use it ? And is there a tripod with it?

Swift
2010-Jun-02, 02:28 PM
liehtyy,

First, welcome to BAUT.

Second, I deleted your duplicate threads. The reason your post/thread didn't appear instantly is that, as part of our anti-spam measures, all posts from "newbies" are held in a "moderation queue" until approved by a moderator. Depending on who's on-line and how busy we are, that sometimes takes a few hours. As soon as you lose your "newbie" status, this will no longer happen.

I leave it to other to answer your question.

RickJ
2010-Jun-02, 03:46 PM
That's one very scary ad. They claim 3 lb. for 4" binoculars. Only way I know to do that is with plastic lenses which don't even work well at 10x let alone 180x. At least I've never seen any that did. You'd need one heck of a heavy tripod to hold binoculars steady at 180x, Even 20x is impossible for a young person to hold steady. Note too that the price is too low for any quality. Most 4" binoculars that only run 25 and 45x (not zoom which is awful for image quality) cost about $1500 and weigh in at say 28 lb. with tripod. The bare minimum for 20x100 binoculars I found was a pair for $300 that weighed in at just under 9 lb. They are of lower optical quality, at least the one example I was able to use was but would likely be far better than what you are looking at. The idea of hand held zoom binoculars of 180x makes superman seem quite possible by comparison.

At his age his eye probably doesn't open more than 5mm, likely less. As I'm about the same age I'd say 10x50 binoculars would be the largest I'd recommend and then only IF he has used them a lot in the past and thus is able to hold them steady, most beginners can't. Adding his age I'd say 7x35 likely the best suited for him. Spend that same $180 and you'd have a very good pair. Actually $50 would get a reasonable pair. Anything larger would need a good binocular stand such as http://www.telescope.com/control/accessories/mounts-and-tripods/orion-paragon-plus-binocular-mount-and-tripod to give a steady view. With that, a good pair of 20x80 binoculars might work for him but you need set up time so the convenience factor is lost.

I'd recommend a good pair of 7x35 binoculars and possibly this to go with it.
http://www.celestron.com/c3/product.php?CatID=57&ProdID=394

It will tell him all about what it is he is looking at.

Rick

redshifter
2010-Jun-02, 06:00 PM
I have an 8X42 pair of binocs that see almost as much use as my 25X100's: http://www.telescope.com/control/binoculars/birding-binoculars/orion-ultraview-8x42-wide-angle-binoculars

They're on the pricey side, but they have sharp optics, nice eye relief, and a HUGE feild of view. They work pretty good for astronomy, and they do well with terrestrial observation such as birding, sporting events, ect. Good 'all around' binocs. If you're serious about a quality pair of large binocs, be prepared to spend at least as much and probably more on a suitable mount and tripod for them. My 25X100's were $400, and I spend an additional 600 on the mount and tripod. It would be vitually impossible to use them any other way, they weigh 10 lbs.

My father-in-law had a pretty good pair of lightweight 20X80's, but not lightweight enough to hand-hold, they still required a good tripod.

liehtyy
2010-Jun-03, 07:39 AM
Swift,
Thanks! I'm sorry that this is my first time to post thread on this forum, I don't know how to operate. So I tried many times to post the same thread. Besides, thanks for other member's suggestions. But I need more information for reference?

redshifter
2010-Jun-03, 05:58 PM
Swift,
Thanks! I'm sorry that this is my first time to post thread on this forum, I don't know how to operate. So I tried many times to post the same thread. Besides, thanks for other member's suggestions. But I need more information for reference?

What other information do you need? Here's a couple general binocular links:
http://www.telescope.com/control/learning-how-to-choose-a-binocular
http://www.telescope.com/control/learning-about-astronomy-with-binoculars