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Squink
2004-Mar-23, 12:07 AM
Lunar mountain has eternal light (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/3549667.stm)
There is a "peak of eternal light" on the Moon - a region from which the Sun never sets, according to astronomers.
...
images of the Moon's poles taken by the 1994 Clementine lunar spacecraft.
...
They found four areas on the rim of Peary, a 73k-wide crater, that appear to stay light for the entire Moon day.

daver
2004-Mar-23, 12:54 AM
Lunar mountain has eternal light (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/3549667.stm)
There is a "peak of eternal light" on the Moon - a region from which the Sun never sets, according to astronomers.
...
images of the Moon's poles taken by the 1994 Clementine lunar spacecraft.
...
They found four areas on the rim of Peary, a 73k-wide crater, that appear to stay light for the entire Moon day.

Yep. It looks like a prime candidate for a moon base. Put your solar array up on a pole on the mountain, dig your base in somewhere on the sides, start prospecting in the near vicinity for water (or hydrogen).

sarongsong
2005-Apr-20, 04:49 AM
April 19
"...That bodes well as a location for a base. "You'd have a permanent source of solar energy, and in an outpost, energy is at a premium," Dr. Bussey said. "If you can do it with solar rather than taking a nuke with you, that's good."..."
NY Times (http://www.nytimes.com/2005/04/19/science/19obse.html?)

Andromeda321
2005-Apr-20, 07:27 PM
Just wondering though, wouldn't the temperature get really hot and hence make the moon base have a few problems if you built it there?

The Supreme Canuck
2005-Apr-20, 07:30 PM
That's less of a problem than the temperature changes that a base anywhere else would have to undergo (day/night cycle).

Andromeda321
2005-Apr-20, 07:50 PM
Oooo that's true, did not think of that!
So if you had a place on the moon perpetually baked by the sun how hot would it be?

sarongsong
2005-Apr-23, 03:05 PM
Eclipsed Moon in Infrared (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html)
"...the bright spots correspond to the warm areas on the lunar surface, and dark areas are cooler. The brightest spot below and left of center is the crater Tycho..."

Scirocco
2005-Apr-24, 07:26 AM
Eclipsed Moon in Infrared (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html)
"...the bright spots correspond to the warm areas on the lunar surface, and dark areas are cooler. The brightest spot below and left of center is the crater Tycho..."
This is an excellent example, but you have to remember that APOD changes, well, every day. Here is a more-permanent link: APOD: 2005 April 23 (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap050423.html). The image also doesn't show the polar area in which the discussion is interested, but rather the Earth-facing hemisphere. Here's another APOD showing the north polar region: APOD: 1996, June 22 (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap960622.html).