PDA

View Full Version : Failed Binary Solar Systems



astrotrain
2010-Jun-08, 08:13 AM
is it even remotely accurate to think of our own solar system as one?

I suppose I'm really wondering how far off was Jupiter from being a star? and whether that figures into the anthropic principle somewhere...

loglo
2010-Jun-08, 10:02 AM
Brown dwarfs - the smallest stars - are defined as starting at 13 Jupiter masses so Jupiter is not really a failed star. Its just an average gas giant.

Galvatron
2010-Jun-08, 10:36 AM
As already stated, Jupiter is nowhere near large enough to become a star.

I thought this thread was going to be about where a binary system had started to form, but something had upset the balance, such as one of the stars exploding or a stellar collision.

Here is a question along similar lines. Imagine two large brown dwarf 'stars'. If they collided, could they form a true star, or would it just result in matter being ejected everywhere?

AriAstronomer
2010-Jun-08, 12:08 PM
Here is a question along similar lines. Imagine two large brown dwarf 'stars'. If they collided, could they form a true star, or would it just result in matter being ejected everywhere?

It would most likely be matter spewing everywhere, at least in the immediate future. A star has distinct layers where fusion occurs and where photons are radiated. Some places near the surface are much too cool for fusion on the order of thousands of degrees kelvin instead of millions required. The two brown dwarfs colliding would probably cause a destruction of the two, and then a star would be created out of the rubble that could turn into a star should it have enough mass. This is assuming that you mean a head on collision, and not one brown dwarf slowly sucking material from the other, or some other situation. Then, I'm not sure if slowly the layers would expand, and the fusion layer would acquire enough material.