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countrywideoptionone
2004-Mar-23, 05:10 PM
My wife and I saw the moon last night and and it brought up a small question that I was hoping someone might be able to help us with. As it was not a full moon only a part, last night a small part, of it was showing. However, it appeared that the dark portion was ever so slightly visible nevertheless. Half of me says that it's simply light reflected from the Earth, to the Moon, and back again. The other half of me says it's just my brain wanting to see the rest of the Moon, so it does. Thanks in advance.

edit:typo

Musashi
2004-Mar-23, 05:13 PM
I think you are right about the reflected light, that or the occlusion of stars might 'give away' the dark portion. I have seen that too but never thought what the explanation was, good question.

SeanF
2004-Mar-23, 05:21 PM
It's referred to as The Old Moon in the New Moon's Arms (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap020419.html), and it is due to reflected Earth light.

:)

Thumper
2004-Mar-23, 05:23 PM
Last night was a "young" Moon. Very thin. The Earth viewed from the Moon at this time is almost full. Plenty of light gets reflected from the Full Earth to illuminate the "dark" Moon. You've heard of Moonshine. This is called Earthshine, and it's beautiful.

countrywideoptionone
2004-Mar-23, 05:25 PM
It's referred to as The Old Moon in the New Moon's Arms (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap020419.html), and it is due to reflected Earth light.

:)

Very nice picture.

Thumper
2004-Mar-23, 05:45 PM
Dang it SeanF, I thought I could actually be the first to get a non-fluff post in and answer a question. Still 0-fer after 240 posts. Oh well.

daver
2004-Mar-23, 07:34 PM
I think you are right about the reflected light, that or the occlusion of stars might 'give away' the dark portion. I have seen that too but never thought what the explanation was, good question.
I wouldn't think it possible to see the night side by occlusion--on the average, the space between visible stars is larger than the size of the full moon. I don't know if you could ever get the moon silhouetted against the milky way.

Normandy6644
2004-Mar-23, 07:35 PM
Dang it SeanF, I thought I could actually be the first to get a non-fluff post in and answer a question. Still 0-fer after 240 posts. Oh well.

It comes with time, and it usually takes a very long relativity thread to do it. :lol:

SeanF
2004-Mar-24, 02:55 PM
Dang it SeanF, I thought I could actually be the first to get a non-fluff post in and answer a question. Still 0-fer after 240 posts. Oh well.

It comes with time, and it usually takes a very long relativity thread to do it. :lol:

Hey, wait a second, I had some non-fluff posts before that thread! :P

Tensor
2004-Mar-24, 03:28 PM
Dang it SeanF, I thought I could actually be the first to get a non-fluff post in and answer a question. Still 0-fer after 240 posts. Oh well.

It comes with time, and it usually takes a very long relativity thread to do it. :lol:

Hey, wait a second, I had some non-fluff posts before that thread! :P

Yeah, me to, but the operative word there is some. :wink:

Taeolas
2004-Mar-24, 04:32 PM
My wife and I saw the moon last night and and it brought up a small question that I was hoping someone might be able to help us with. As it was not a full moon only a part, last night a small part, of it was showing. However, it appeared that the dark portion was ever so slightly visible nevertheless. Half of me says that it's simply light reflected from the Earth, to the Moon, and back again. The other half of me says it's just my brain wanting to see the rest of the Moon, so it does. Thanks in advance.

edit:typo

In my Astronomy class in university, I believe the term we used for it was "Earth Shine" owing to the fact that the visible dark part was being lit by sunlight reflected from Earth.

I may be wrong though; it's been a few years now.

In any case, it's a very nice effect. I noticed it a couple of nites ago as well as I was walking home from the bus stop, even with the lights of Ottawa below it.

milli360
2004-Mar-24, 06:14 PM
Be sure and watch tonight--Venus will be very close to the new moon.

snabald
2004-Mar-24, 06:57 PM
It's referred to as The Old Moon in the New Moon's Arms (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap020419.html), and it is due to reflected Earth light.

:)

That is amazingly beautiful!