PDA

View Full Version : What is hollow earth?



mtbmikex9
2010-Jun-26, 02:57 AM
What is the hollow earth theory. I heard it some where on tv but I was bored so i turned the chan.

Swift
2010-Jun-26, 03:04 AM
Welcome to BAUT mtbmikex9.

wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hollow_Earth) is a place to start

Jens
2010-Jun-28, 02:09 AM
What is the hollow earth theory. I heard it some where on tv but I was bored so i turned the chan.

Sorry to answer a question with a question, but if you interested in the question, why did you get bored and turn the "chan", whatever that is?:think:

Infinitenight2093
2010-Jun-28, 07:12 AM
Have you ever seen the movie, "Journey to the center of the Earth"? that should give you a good idea of what this "theory" is

Hungry4info
2010-Jun-28, 10:08 AM
It's a source of amusement no less.

(click for full res)
13356

neilzero
2010-Jun-28, 11:29 AM
A gentleman, named Crenshaw who lived in Yulee, Florida produced the Hollow Earth news until recently. He explained some details to me, but that appears unworkable for several reasons: 1 The air pressure at the center would be hundreds of times sea level pressure, so the light from the central sun would be mostly absorbed by the time it reached the inner surface. 2 This would heat the air to thousands of degrees c, even if the central sun produced only visable light, sufficient for photosynthesis, in the crop growing areas. 3 In theory the inner surface could be kept cool by bringing in lots air from the outer surface, but the hot air would need to be vented. The hot air sources would be easily detected because of the very large volume of hot air = volcanoes, perhaps? 4 No known material is strong enough to prevent the collapse of the crust and mantel into the hollow center, even if the wall thickness is 800 miles. 5 The central sun would drift from it's center position without active station keeping. 6 Down is the opposite direction on the inner surface of the sphere, but gravity is zero though out the interior of a symmetrical sphere of uniform density. Even assuming large density and symmetry variations the gravity would be tiny. 7 Huge volumes of data suggest that Earth is not hollow. Small asteroids and moons could however be hollow because of their very small gravity. Now I go to read www.wikipedia.org Neil

astromark
2010-Jun-29, 07:45 AM
What is the hollow earth theory. I heard it some where on tv but I was bored so i turned the chan.

If you are able to hold your attention for just a few more seconds I will tell you that all of what you heard about the hollow earth is nonsense.

WayneFrancis
2010-Jun-29, 02:32 PM
What is the hollow earth theory. I heard it some where on tv but I was bored so i turned the chan.

Its as much of a scientific theory as the Theory of the Land of Oz or Alice in Wonderland or Flat Earth Theory.

Just because a tv show says something is a scientific theory doesn't make it so. Actually you've got a better bet on what they say either being completely wrong or grossly misstated or hugely over simplified. Like it has been suggested if you are interested then Google it...read reputable sights first. Wikipedia is not a bad start. If after a little research you are still confused or have questions then some place like here is a good next step.

Andrew D
2010-Jun-29, 03:46 PM
Does the idea assume someone on the inteior of the 'Earth shell' is gravitationally bound to the interior of the shell? It seems to me an explanation of the gravitational field inside a spherical mass would be a good way to illustrate the 'creativity' of the theory to the OP.

JohnD
2010-Jun-29, 04:03 PM
Perilously ATM, don't you think?

John Mendenhall
2010-Jun-29, 04:08 PM
Agreed with John D.

pzkpfw
2010-Jun-29, 07:42 PM
JohnD and John Mendenhall, if you have concerns with a thread or post, use the report button. Your posts in the thread itself are off topic.

Swift
2010-Jun-29, 09:13 PM
Just to answer further - yes the Hollow Earth idea would be an ATM idea. It is completely appropriate to ask about an ATM idea in Q&A, as long as one accepts the mainstream answer. But advocating an ATM idea in Q&A is strictly against our rules, and arguing with the mainstream answers that might be given will often constitute advocating.

Noclevername
2010-Jun-29, 09:25 PM
OK, here's the mainstream answer as I understand it-- a hollow Earth is impossible for several reasons, the main one being direct observation; we've detected seismic shockwaves passing all the way through the Earth and seen no signs of any hollow space inside. As if that weren't enough, the laws of physics also veto the concept. With the entire mass of Earth being pulled inward by gravity, any hollow space would need some kind of pressure or repulsive force strong enough to hold all the Earth's weight outward against that gravity; no such force has ever beeen known to exist, and any amount of matter under pressure that high would be far too dense to call the space it fills "hollow".

BigDon
2010-Jun-29, 09:56 PM
If you are able to hold your attention for just a few more seconds I will tell you that all of what you herd about the hollow earth is nonsense.

Hey Mark, lately you've been dropping the "a" out of "heard". "Heard" is the past tense of "hear". "Herd" is a group of cattle.

RalofTyr
2010-Jun-30, 04:48 AM
A Hollow Earth is a very small Dyson Sphere.

neilzero
2010-Jun-30, 05:45 AM
Hi Ral, That suggests an interesting idea. If an asteroid 1000 kilometers in diameter is mostly radioactive isotopes, it will stay hot for a billion years, so an advanced civilization might build a "tiny" = Earth size Dyson sphere around it. If the Dyson sphere reflects most of the energy back at the asteroid it could heat to about 5000 k and give light like a miniature sun which would allow hydroponics photosynthesis on the inner surface of the Dyson sphere. In most respects it would be much like a large Dyson sphere, except the asteroid would cool very slowly, if the civilization used more than a few million megawatts of the energy that fell on the inner surface. Most of the light and infrared needs to be reflected back at the asteroid.
A white dwarf, neutron star or quark star that had cooled to about 5000 k, would also work well with a "tiny" Dyson sphere, I think. Neil

Noclevername
2010-Jun-30, 06:40 PM
A white dwarf, neutron star or quark star that had cooled to about 5000 k, would also work well with a "tiny" Dyson sphere, I think. Neil

But the gravity would be a problem, the primary would still be of stellar mass. So "tiny" (Earth-sized) might put it too deep into the gravity well.

astromark
2010-Jun-30, 09:01 PM
Hey Mark, lately you've been dropping the "a" out of "heard". "Heard" is the past tense of "hear". "Herd" is a group of cattle.

Thankyou Don... let me just learn... I heard you say.

In fiction writings a type of hollow earth like environment called a Dyson sphere is a not so well thought through fiction.

Has ' mtbmikex9 ' dropped by again... welcome;

Noclevername
2010-Jul-02, 01:27 PM
In fiction writings a type of hollow earth like environment called a Dyson sphere is a not so well thought through fiction.

Depends on which kind of Dyson Sphere you mean (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dyson_sphere#Variants). The Dyson Swarm concept is feasible; the solid shell isn't, but it's just too darn cool an image to ignore. And then there's the Dyson Bubble supported by light pressure; not as conducive to awesome-looking inside-out worlds, but more plausible and still able to support hanging habitats large enough collectively to hold many times Earth's population.