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View Full Version : Dr Who predicted what happens if you penetrate the Earth' s crust!



wd40
2010-Jul-03, 06:56 PM
"Inferno" was one of the more frightening episodes of the 1970 British science fiction TV series "Dr Who"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inferno_(Doctor_Who)

It can be seen in full here
http://www.dailymotion.com/playlist/xwiv2_tardismedia_inferno#videoId=x8tjt7

http://www.tvshowsondvd.net/graphics/news3/DrWho-Inferno.jpg

In the show, drilling too deep spells...the end of the world!

JonClarke
2010-Jul-04, 03:42 AM
That was one of the best Pertwee stories IMHO.

Paul Beardsley
2010-Jul-04, 06:38 AM
That was one of the best Pertwee stories IMHO.

Yes - and Pertwee was particularly well-served in story terms.

By contrast, Tom Baker was not. (IMO, obviously.) Everyone remembers his portrayal as the Doctor, but specific stories are rarely mentioned.

I reckon the only stories better than Inferno are The Daleks, The Crusade and The Massacre (Hartnell era) and The Evil of the Daleks (Troughton).

captain swoop
2010-Jul-04, 11:35 AM
It was OK, not one that stands out for me though. Giant Maggots in Wales, that's what you want.

Paul Beardsley
2010-Jul-04, 03:53 PM
Giant Maggots in Wales, that's what you want.

The Green Death: probably not the best story, but definitely the best ending!

IsaacKuo
2010-Jul-04, 04:20 PM
Yes, I've made this comparison also:


This is reminding me more and more of Doctor Who's Inferno (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inferno_%28Doctor_Who%29).

I've openly pondered what Brigade Leader Lethbridge-Stewart would do, but of course no one ever gets it.

Paul Beardsley
2010-Jul-04, 04:38 PM
Well so far they've drilled through the Earth's crust five times:

1. Dalek Invasion of Earth
2. Inferno
3. Inferno
4. The Runaway Bride
5. The Hungry Earth/Cold Blood

On only two occasions did it result in the release of weird gas (Stahlman gas in (2. Inferno) and Stahlmann gas in (3. Inferno)) which turned people into violent Primords.

wd40
2010-Jul-04, 05:38 PM
In the pre-cg 60s and 70s, the Daleks, Cybermen, Mechanoids, Silurians etc etc, even the Doctors themselves, were frightening enough at the time. IMO, the nightmarishly thought-provoking plots weren't too psychologically healthy for a whole lot of 10-year old UK youths at the time, who are today in their 50s, & I wouldn't be surprised if it contributed to mental distrurbances in a lot of them to this day!

TJMac
2010-Jul-04, 07:56 PM
I started watching Dr Who in the late 70's, when a local PBS station was playing episodes daily, commercial free. Baker was The Doctor, and because there was no internet (IMDB in particular:shifty: ) I was quite slow to realize that by that point, there was considerable history to the program. I really had no idea that Tom Baker was the "4th" Doctor.

They quit carrying it, shortly after the regeneration into Peter Davidson. I did not like him as well as Baker, and I had not seen any of the first three.

I prefer the newer incarnation of the series. It always seemed to me, that a being that was ageless, (is he? not sure now that I type that) would grow into maturity, but not into old age, to spend the centuries. Rather, would stay looking youngish, or at least middle aged. Just speculation on my part. :think:

I had stopped watching TV much at all, and missed just about everything else up until Tennant's reign, and was mildly suprised that so many regenerations had taken place. I'd like to find some boxed sets and catch up on it all.

Paul Beardsley
2010-Jul-04, 08:20 PM
Boxed sets of the new series are readily available, TJMac, but if you want to explore the old series, your problems are threefold:

1. Many episodes (108 I think) of the Hartnell and Troughton Doctors were destroyed and now exist only on CD as audio recordings with narration. (They actually make for very enjoyable listening for the most part.)

2. Releases of stories from the old series have been extremely erratic and arbitrary and slow. The glacial release of VHS continued well into the DVD era.

3. I personally think the very early stuff is wonderful, the best, but a lot of people can't deal with the fact that they are black and white, slow-moving, and often resemble televised plays.

I recommend interested would-be fans get the DVD set called The Beginning. It consists of 13 25-minute episodes, including:

1. The first four-part serial, An Unearthly Child. The first episode of this sees two schoolteachers investigating their strange pupil Susan, eventually discovering she lives in a policebox with her grandfather. The Doctor is not at all what we later come to expect - he's old, actively unpleasant, and very mysterious. The next three episodes require an abundance of patience and imagination. The story they tell is simple and extremely slow-moving, but there are some spellbinding moments. You have to imagine how you would cope if you found yourself plucked out of your mundane life and deposited in the stone age, with absolutely no guarantee of ever getting home.

2. The Daleks, a seven part serial follows. Try to forget everything you think you know about the Daleks. This is how it really started.

3. Inside the Spaceship, a two parter. Like a Harold Pinter play set in a haunted time machine.

captain swoop
2010-Jul-04, 09:57 PM
3. I personally think the very early stuff is wonderful, the best, but a lot of people can't deal with the fact that they are black and white, slow-moving, and often resemble televised plays.


Because they were telivised plays. Performed live for the cameras. That's why he had companions. While setting up between scenes they could cut to whatever a companion was doing. It was one of the reasons they were always split up early on.
Recording them was a secondary consideration. back then the BBC didn't think of repeating what they considered a one off broadcast.

TJMac
2010-Jul-05, 04:22 AM
TY, Paul, I will look into that. Sounds interesting. Ive never had problem with black and white. Our first TV was a 19 inch Sony B&W. My father disapproved severely of TV in general, so we had to sneak it upstairs into my brothers room. (later he would climb the stairs in the evening to watch news, but never changed his mind on the "devil's eyeball" )

captain swoop
2010-Jul-05, 06:34 PM
They are more scary in B&W

Paul Beardsley
2010-Jul-05, 08:19 PM
Because they were telivised plays. Performed live for the cameras. That's why he had companions. While setting up between scenes they could cut to whatever a companion was doing. It was one of the reasons they were always split up early on.
Recording them was a secondary consideration. back then the BBC didn't think of repeating what they considered a one off broadcast.

I'm not sure if I'm misinterpreting you here, Captain - you are aware that Doctor Who was never broadcast live?

Paul Beardsley
2010-Jul-05, 08:21 PM
TY, Paul, I will look into that. Sounds interesting.

You're welcome. Hope you're not disappointed.


Ive never had problem with black and white. Our first TV was a 19 inch Sony B&W. My father disapproved severely of TV in general, so we had to sneak it upstairs into my brothers room. (later he would climb the stairs in the evening to watch news, but never changed his mind on the "devil's eyeball" )

Enjoyable story!

JonClarke
2010-Jul-12, 09:07 AM
Yes - and Pertwee was particularly well-served in story terms.

By contrast, Tom Baker was not. (IMO, obviously.) Everyone remembers his portrayal as the Doctor, but specific stories are rarely mentioned.).

I don't know about that. Without looking anything up there were some very good episodes - Genesis of the Daleks, The invisible assassin, City of Death, abd of course the Key of Time episodes.

Of the Pertwee era the ones I remember best are The Claws of Axons, and the Sea Devil and Silurian episodes (other than Inferno of course).

The Invasion knocked my socks off when I was 12, but there is no way of seeing this again to see if it has aged well. The Hartnell era I find strictly of aniquarian interest.

captain swoop
2010-Jul-12, 12:38 PM
A lot of the pertwee stories were stretched over 6 episoedes and seemed to drag in the middle. There were a few escape, get captured agains stuck in to pad the stories.

JonClarke
2010-Jul-12, 10:13 PM
A lot of the pertwee stories were stretched over 6 episoedes and seemed to drag in the middle. There were a few escape, get captured agains stuck in to pad the stories.

Yes, I was struck recently how slow paced many of the earlier episodes were, compared to modern tastes. Rewatched City of Death a short time ago, and there was a lot of time spent just walking round Paris (maybe to remind people that this was the first time an episode was filmed outside the UK). The Hartnell era stories were really slow moving.

DonM435
2010-Jul-13, 04:19 AM
Long ago, Professor Challenger stuck a spear into the center of the Earth and it screamed!

So says Dr. Arthur Conan Doyle, honestly.

captain swoop
2010-Jul-13, 08:37 AM
To my taste 4 x 25 min episodes is the best format. Plenty of time to develop the plot or characters, end of episode 'cliffhangers' and if the do put a bit of padding in it isn't noticed with the story being broken up into sections. My biggest complaint with the new format is 45 mins is too short. Stories seem rushed apart from the occasional two parter.

Paul Beardsley
2010-Jul-13, 05:15 PM
I don't know about that. Without looking anything up there were some very good episodes - Genesis of the Daleks, The invisible assassin, City of Death, abd of course the Key of Time episodes.

Genesis of the Daleks - very highly regarded by a great many fans. I'm an exception - I thought it was cheap, fannish, and undermining both in terms of Dalek continuity (it contradicted much of what was "known" about Dalek history, which was a problem at the time because the novelisation of the first Daleks story had recently been re-released and the film version had been recently shown on TV) and in terms of their impact (suddenly the Daleks were robotic henchmen controlled by a ranting idiot in a desperately unconvincing mask - a pattern that was to continue for the rest of the series). Fans seem to praise this mainly for two scenes - one, an admittedly pretty good moment where the Doctor has the opportunity to delete the Daleks from history but questions his right to do this, and another, not so good, rant by the silly Davros about having a virus that could wipe out the universe.

The Invisible Assassin - you're conflating The Invisible Enemy with The Deadly Assassin, which could be a very interesting experiment! ;) Invisible Enemy was the one with the giant prawn which, in its natural form, was small enough to invade the Doctor's brain, so clones of him and Leela were miniaturised and sent in to fight it. Fantastic Voyage had been on TV not so long before this was made.

The Deadly Assassin was hated by large numbers of fans who rejected it from canon. The Deadly Assassin was embraced by large numbers of fans who rejoiced in its challenge to the traditional portrayal of Time Lord society. I think it was the schism that keeps it fresh in fan memory. It is quite good, IMO, but not great.

City of Death - the only problem with that is that it's so good there's a danger of rewatching it too often and becoming overfamiliar with it.

Key to Time - enjoyable, but probably not as good as you remember. Have you seen The Armaggeddon Factor recently?

There are other good'uns - I particularly liked Logopolis, the Robots of Death, and the aforementioned City of Death - but for such a long run (7 years), story titles are few. I've re-watched all of Tom Baker's run in recentish years, and I was conscious of the fact that a fair few stories were absolute rubbish in story terms (Robot, The Sun Makers, Underworld, Creature from the Pit, The Android Invasion, Meglos and many others) but still entertained, sometimes because of a couple of amusing ideas, but usually because of Tom Baker's performance and his interaction with other characters - especially Lalla Ward.


The Invasion knocked my socks off when I was 12, but there is no way of seeing this again to see if it has aged well.

Actually you can. Of the eight episodes, six survive, and the lost two were reconstructed as high-quality animation (I've only seen excerpts) and original soundtrack.

IsaacKuo
2010-Jul-13, 07:13 PM
Key to Time - enjoyable, but probably not as good as you remember. Have you seen The Armaggeddon Factor recently?
Just curious--What's wrong with The Armageddon Factor? I thought it was better than the rest of the arc. I'll admit that it's the only one of them I've rewatched in recent years, but it's also the only one I was interested in rewatching.

I love watching the Sky Marshall, and the cold distant depiction of nuclear space warfare. Upon rewatching, I appreciated how the SFX budget is stretched out to good effect (reusing the same footage repeatedly in a dramatically successful way!). There's some unnecessary silliness and stretching out (it was a 6 episode story, after all), but I thought it all came together pretty well overall and the good parts more than made up for it.

That said, this is all just my personal take on The Armageddon Factor. I don't know how it's regarded by the fans or critics. So I'm curious as to how it's regarded by others.

Paul Beardsley
2010-Jul-13, 07:50 PM
Just curious--What's wrong with The Armageddon Factor? I thought it was better than the rest of the arc. I'll admit that it's the only one of them I've rewatched in recent years, but it's also the only one I was interested in rewatching.

I love watching the Sky Marshall, and the cold distant depiction of nuclear space warfare. Upon rewatching, I appreciated how the SFX budget is stretched out to good effect (reusing the same footage repeatedly in a dramatically successful way!). There's some unnecessary silliness and stretching out (it was a 6 episode story, after all), but I thought it all came together pretty well overall and the good parts more than made up for it.

That said, this is all just my personal take on The Armageddon Factor. I don't know how it's regarded by the fans or critics. So I'm curious as to how it's regarded by others.

I've bolded the main points of what's bad about it. Adding: the Shadow, who suddenly appears, and is supposed to be playing the Black Guardian's pawn in the same way that the Doctor is playing the White Guardian's pawn, even though the Shadow has done nothing whatsoever during the search for the first five segments. And, despite the utter emergency of the situation that required the searching of the six segments, when they finally are put together, there's no indication that the White Guardian has done anything with them, or indeed had any opportunity to do so. It's like wading through The Lord of the Rings (imagining it being quite a lot longer than it is and not as good), finally getting to the Mount Doom scene, and Frodo simply chucks the ring on the floor and walks away - without any consequences. Or Luke Skywalker coming up with some platitudinous reason for not blowing up the Death Star, and it all ending happily anyway.

Thinking about it, there are some great scenes in it, including the Marshall having to have it explained to him that the battle did not go well, and the Doctor's absolute corruption by absolute power. But, like much else written at the time, it didn't hang together.

IsaacKuo
2010-Jul-14, 04:06 AM
I've bolded the main points of what's bad about it. Adding: the Shadow, who suddenly appears, and is supposed to be playing the Black Guardian's pawn in the same way that the Doctor is playing the White Guardian's pawn, even though the Shadow has done nothing whatsoever during the search for the first five segments. And, despite the utter emergency of the situation that required the searching of the six segments, when they finally are put together, there's no indication that the White Guardian has done anything with them, or indeed had any opportunity to do so.
I wasn't bothered by any of that, myself. The Shadow's strategy seemed sensible enough--why chase around time and space for each and every segment when you can just let the enemy do all the hard work and wait for them at the last one?

And I was satisfied by the Doctor's comment that the White Guardian should have been able to do what he needed to before the Key was dispersed again. I guess I'm just easy to satisfy, there.

Thinking about it, there are some great scenes in it, including the Marshall having to have it explained to him that the battle did not go well, and the Doctor's absolute corruption by absolute power. But, like much else written at the time, it didn't hang together.
Maybe I just have lower expectations for classic Who in general. Having a few good points, like the very watchable Marshall, was enough to make me regard The Armageddon Factor above the rest of the Key to Time arc.

captain swoop
2010-Jul-14, 09:17 PM
Brain of Morbius, Ark in Space, Robots of Death, Horror of Fang Rock and Image of the Fandahl are my Tom Baker faves.

Paul Beardsley
2010-Jul-14, 10:11 PM
I wasn't bothered by any of that, myself. The Shadow's strategy seemed sensible enough--why chase around time and space for each and every segment when you can just let the enemy do all the hard work and wait for them at the last one?

Well, given that the segments were individually powerful, and the Doctor was keeping them in a very safe place, and the Shadow didn't seem to have much of a plan to steal them (and indeed didn't steal them)... But it has been a while since I saw it.


And I was satisfied by the Doctor's comment that the White Guardian should have been able to do what he needed to before the Key was dispersed again. I guess I'm just easy to satisfy, there.

I don't remember him saying even that... though again, it's been a while. But it may have been a case of you watching six episodes. I'd just watched twenty six. To follow a quest story for so long, and have the "pay off" reduced to a throwaway line of exposition, is short-changing on a grand scale. I can't think of anything that compares with it, except perhaps the animated version of Lord of the Rings, which suddenly announced (halfway through the events of The Two Towers) that the forces of evil were swept from the land


Maybe I just have lower expectations for classic Who in general. Having a few good points, like the very watchable Marshall, was enough to make me regard The Armageddon Factor above the rest of the Key to Time arc.

You might enjoy the Big Finish "Key 2 Time" Trilogy (actually three audio plays and one audio story). It has some very neat bits (as well as some dull, confused, and downright awful bits). Peter Davison stars as the Doctor.

JonClarke
2010-Jul-14, 10:32 PM
Genesis of the Daleks - very highly regarded by a great many fans. I'm an exception - I thought it was cheap, fannish, and undermining both in terms of Dalek continuity (it contradicted much of what was "known" about Dalek history, which was a problem at the time because the novelisation of the first Daleks story had recently been re-released and the film version had been recently shown on TV) and in terms of their impact (suddenly the Daleks were robotic henchmen controlled by a ranting idiot in a desperately unconvincing mask - a pattern that was to continue for the rest of the series). Fans seem to praise this mainly for two scenes - one, an admittedly pretty good moment where the Doctor has the opportunity to delete the Daleks from history but questions his right to do this, and another, not so good, rant by the silly Davros about having a virus that could wipe out the universe.

But me with the majority on this one!

The Invisible Assassin - you're conflating The Invisible Enemy with The Deadly Assassin, which could be a very interesting experiment! ;) Invisible Enemy was the one with the giant prawn which, in its natural form, was small enough to invade the Doctor's brain, so clones of him and Leela were miniaturised and sent in to fight it. Fantastic Voyage had been on TV not so long before this was made.[/QUOTE]

Of course, the Deadly Assassin was what I meant. Hey, at least it shows I was not cheating about remembering it! :). Invisble assassin was not great but it did introduce K9 and is one of the few SF stories set on Titan,whch is always a plus.

The Deadly Assassin was hated by large numbers of fans who rejected it from canon. The Deadly Assassin was embraced by large numbers of fans who rejoiced in its challenge to the traditional portrayal of Time Lord society. I think it was the schism that keeps it fresh in fan memory. It is quite good, IMO, but not great.[/QUOTE]

I think it is interesting for several reasons, its portrayal of Gallifrey and Time Lord Society, that it was companion free, and because it one of the relatively few occasions where the Dr resorts to overt violence.


Key to Time - enjoyable, but probably not as good as you remember. Have you seen The Armaggeddon Factor recently?

So you do remember it! I saw it again a couple of years ago. Not one of the better ones but not bad either. The arcas a whole I found most interesting in taking the series into new territory.





Actually you can. Of the eight episodes, six survive, and the lost two were reconstructed as high-quality animation (I've only seen excerpts) and original soundtrack.

I would rather not watch a partial reconstrcution. There should be a right to dine in sucxh bad injured cases......

captain swoop
2010-Jul-15, 10:34 AM
The Deadly Assassin was hated by large numbers of fans who rejected it from cano So these fans decide on the 'Canon' and not the people who produce and write the show?

I hate this 'Canon' thing that Sci-Fi and Fantasy Fans bring up. I have even heard fans of Fantasy books rejecting things that the author has included in his own books as against some kind of 'Canon'

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Jul-16, 04:35 PM
well here is a place online that shows a lot of the old doctor episodes, yes there are ads.
http://www.doctorwho-episodes.com/watch-doctor-who-episodes/doctor-who-series-5

captain swoop
2010-Jul-17, 08:05 PM
IS that a pirate site?

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Jul-18, 09:55 PM
Don't think so.