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AndreasJ
2010-Jul-06, 09:15 PM
I just realized that Metroid, a video game I haven't played in closer to two decades, is not, in fact, called "Meteoroid". In my defense, meteoro- regularly gets pronounced as metro- where I'm from*, but I still feel rather silly.

Anyone else got any odd realizations to share?


* Thus, meteorologi and metrologi are homophones.

Fazor
2010-Jul-06, 09:27 PM
Heh I was just playing metroid the other night. Gotta love emulators.

Argos
2010-Jul-06, 09:44 PM
* Thus, meteorologi and metrologi are homophones.

Their respective pronunciations are quite different [according to Merriam-Webster OnLine].

Meteorology (http://www.merriam-webster.com/cgi-bin/audio.pl?meteor11=meteorology)

Metrology (http://www.merriam-webster.com/cgi-bin/audio.pl?metrol01=metrology)

AndreasJ
2010-Jul-06, 09:51 PM
Their pronunciation are quite different [according to Merriam-Webster OnLine].
As a rule of thumb, English dictionaries are not reliable sources on Swedish pronunciation.

Argos
2010-Jul-06, 09:52 PM
Oops, sorry. You´re talking Swedish. Skip it...

AndreasJ
2010-Jul-06, 09:58 PM
No worries. :)

NEOWatcher
2010-Jul-20, 08:08 PM
How about an entire region coming to a realization (ok, maybe just the rulers of it)

Indonesian Muslims 'praying in wrong direction' (http://www.cnn.com/2010/WORLD/asiapcf/07/19/indonesia.wrong.prayer.direction/?hpt=Sbin)

The Indonesian Ulema Council told the country's Muslim populace in March to turn west when they offered their daily prayers [...] So, on Friday, the council issued a new edict: face northwest [...] Amin said the new edict does not mean that mosques in the country will need to be torn down. "They (those praying inside) just need to adjust their praying direction slightly," he said.
It makes me wonder which direction they prayed before March. :think:

clop
2010-Jul-20, 08:47 PM
How about an entire region coming to a realization (ok, maybe just the rulers of it)

Indonesian Muslims 'praying in wrong direction' (http://www.cnn.com/2010/WORLD/asiapcf/07/19/indonesia.wrong.prayer.direction/?hpt=Sbin)

It makes me wonder which direction they prayed before March. :think:

Since Muslims pray directly towards Mecca (which is in Saudi Arabia) you'd think that in the US they should pray directly into the ground, since Mecca is on the other side of the earth and therefore below their feet. Praying east would mean facing along the tangent.

One realisation that I came to whilst lying in bed one night is that the earth does not rotate 365 times on its axis during a 365 day year. It does 366 rotations, and 367 during a leap year.

clop

AndreasJ
2010-Jul-20, 09:14 PM
Since Muslims pray directly towards Mecca (which is in Saudi Arabia) you'd think that in the US they should pray directly into the ground, since Mecca is on the other side of the earth and therefore below their feet. Praying east would mean facing along the tangent.
There's apparently a dispute whehter the line towards Mecca (qibla) should be taken along a great circle or a loxodrome (line of constant meridian angle). In some parts of the world the difference is radical, eg. in Alaska where the great circle qibla points to the north (across the Arctic and down the other side of the globe to Arabia) and the loxodrome one southwest.

But in either case, the "true" qibla from Indonesia would be somewhere between west and northwest, so the new policy doesn't seem a big improvement.

Edit: A more useful definition of "loxodrome" may be: a straight line on the Mercator map.

Nick Theodorakis
2010-Jul-21, 03:42 AM
...
Edit: A more useful definition of "loxodrome" may be: a straight line on the Mercator map.

Kind of "backwards," though -- Kremer (Mercator) made his map that way so that loxodromes would be straight, as an aid to navigation (and it still took awhile to catch on).

Nick

KaiYeves
2010-Jul-21, 11:52 PM
I only realized the joke behind the old Calvin and Hobbes strip about going to school only three days a year meaning that "By the time you were in second grade, you could retire!" a few weeks ago, after reading it when I was about 8 and having no idea why it was supposed to be funny for the intervening half of my life.

Solfe
2010-Jul-22, 03:56 AM
After years of listening to XTC and INXS, I told my I could never write music or lyrics due to a lack of the right kind of creativity. By way of example I noted how each band created catchy but random string of letter for their names. She thought I was kidding and had to explain that they spelled out words.

Solfe

Jens
2010-Jul-22, 08:16 AM
This may be a bit obscure, but it took me a long time before I realized that the word renumeration should be remuneration, for some odd reason.

I wonder how many Americans once wondered why their country was invisible. :)

Nicolas
2010-Jul-22, 02:27 PM
One realisation that I came to whilst lying in bed one night is that the earth does not rotate 365 times on its axis during a 365 day year. It does 366 rotations, and 367 during a leap year.

I don't get it. Say that a year has 3 days.

Monday 00:00, the year starts. day 1 just started. The earth hasn't rotated yet.
+24h
Tuesday 00:00. The year is 1 day old now. Day 1 just ended. Day 2 just started. The earth has made 1 rotation since the start of the year.
+24h
Wednesday 00:00. The year is 2 day old now. Day 2 just ended. Day 3 just started. The earth has made 2 rotations since the start of the year.
+24h
Wednesday 23:59. Day 3 of the year has ended. In a second, it will be new year. The earth has made 3 rotations since the start of the year.

So... 3 rotations in a 3 day year.

SeanF
2010-Jul-22, 03:39 PM
Nicolas, don't forget that the Earth is moving around the sun also. If the Earth made exactly one rotation during the year, there would be no days - the sun would never move in the sky.

Two rotations would give one day. The first rotation would last half the year, but would only take the day from noon to midnight (the Earth would be on the other side of the sun by then. So although any given point on the Earth is pointing in the same direction, the sun is now in the opposite direction). The second rotation would last the second half of the year and take the day from midnight back to noon.

I don't think I'm explaining it very well...:think:

Gillianren
2010-Jul-22, 07:05 PM
This may be a bit obscure, but it took me a long time before I realized that the word renumeration should be remuneration, for some odd reason.

I wonder how many Americans once wondered why their country was invisible. :)

I forget which book it's in, but in one of Beverly Cleary's books, Ramona takes pride in her new word, "donzer." It gives a "lee light."

adapa
2010-Jul-23, 12:44 AM
It was not until I became reasonably skillful at ballroom dancing when I finally realized that songs like "End of The Road" by Boyz II Men and "Kiss From A Rose" by Seal are actually Viennese waltzes.

pzkpfw
2010-Jul-23, 01:19 AM
I only realized the joke behind the old Calvin and Hobbes strip about going to school only three days a year meaning that "By the time you were in second grade, you could retire!" a few weeks ago, after reading it when I was about 8 and having no idea why it was supposed to be funny for the intervening half of my life.

Took me ages to "get" Groucho Marx : "that was no lady, that was my wife". (But apologies to AndreasJ, I'm not exactly sure this is what he's after).

AndreasJ
2010-Jul-23, 08:00 AM
Took me ages to "get" Groucho Marx : "that was no lady, that was my wife". (But apologies to AndreasJ, I'm not exactly sure this is what he's after).

It's close enough. :)

Tobin Dax
2010-Jul-23, 08:22 PM
Well, what do you know. "End of the Road" is another song to add to my list of dance music. If only I was any good at the Viennese waltz.

After someone referred to the song "16 Tons" earlier this week, I realized that the Stray Cats had sampled it for "Stray Cat Strut."

Nicolas
2010-Jul-26, 07:56 PM
Nicolas, don't forget that the Earth is moving around the sun also. If the Earth made exactly one rotation during the year, there would be no days - the sun would never move in the sky.

Two rotations would give one day. The first rotation would last half the year, but would only take the day from noon to midnight (the Earth would be on the other side of the sun by then. So although any given point on the Earth is pointing in the same direction, the sun is now in the opposite direction). The second rotation would last the second half of the year and take the day from midnight back to noon.

I don't think I'm explaining it very well...:think:

I think an animation would work better. :) But I get the point. Unless you start talking about retrograde vs prograde, then all the maths change. :)

mugaliens
2010-Jul-27, 12:03 AM
...then all the maths change.

I keep seeing this odd (to me) use of a plural for math here on BAUT, and finally did some quick research. Turns out "math" was coined as a short form of "mathematics" around 1847, while "maths" didn't rear its head until 1911. The latter was and remains chiefly British. If I were to have written this phrase, it'd have been "then all the math changes."

mugaliens
2010-Jul-27, 12:08 AM
Heh I was just playing metroid the other night. Gotta love emulators.

Don't you just love progress where an 4.77 kHz 8086 chip can run some of those old line graphics video games with aplomb, while their flash versions can bog down a 1.5 GHz Core 2 chip?

Jens
2010-Jul-27, 04:44 AM
I keep seeing this odd (to me) use of a plural for math here on BAUT, and finally did some quick research. Turns out "math" was coined as a short form of "mathematics" around 1847, while "maths" didn't rear its head until 1911. The latter was and remains chiefly British. If I were to have written this phrase, it'd have been "then all the math changes."

There's a song by Radiohead where they say "he talks in maths," and I found it puzzling also. But I've seen it enough that I've come to accept it as another example of the British mangling our language. :)

Fazor
2010-Aug-09, 08:54 PM
This is more like "obvious realizations" but I just now realized, after writing it on forms all day long, that today's date is 8/9/10 (as written in our apparently uniquely American format of MM/DD/YY).

I hope this doesn't mean that we're in some sort of galactic-alignment and that a rogue dwarf star-shaped-alien-ship is going to collide with us today!

KaiYeves
2010-Aug-10, 03:28 PM
This is more like "obvious realizations" but I just now realized, after writing it on forms all day long, that today's date is 8/9/10 (as written in our apparently uniquely American format of MM/DD/YY).


How'd I miss that? I love looking out for days when the date does funny things like that!

AndreasJ
2010-Aug-10, 04:20 PM
I hope this doesn't mean that we're in some sort of galactic-alignment and that a rogue dwarf star-shaped-alien-ship is going to collide with us today!
Actually it meant that the Sirians passed by and stole away all the really good and kind people from the planet.

KaiYeves
2010-Aug-11, 12:26 AM
Yesterday I was tired, and I read a video gaming magazine belonging to my brothers very early in the morning. One article had a guy making fun of people at a gaming convention saying "There are so many virgins here that Richard Branson is sponsoring this event!" I couldn't get why that was funny, so I went off and did something.

Three hours later, I was eating lunch and thought back to that joke...

"Ohhhhhhhh... Branson... the Virgin group... I'm an idiot!"

grapes
2010-Aug-11, 02:03 AM
One realisation that I came to whilst lying in bed one night is that the earth does not rotate 365 times on its axis during a 365 day year. It does 366 rotations, and 367 during a leap year.Actually, 365.9993 during a normal year, 367.002 during a leap year. :)

dwnielsen
2010-Aug-11, 04:10 AM
That was good one, clop. It wasn't until last year that I looked up (or down?) a South-up map of Earth - or a McArthur map. Strange getting used to it. I only really started thinking about this after watching the movie The Island at the Top of the World - although there is a certain pragmatic historical truth to "top". Also realized that after the next magnetic reversal (should "we" be around), we would call the North Pole the South - obvious, but weird nonetheless.

grapes
2010-Aug-12, 03:26 PM
Also realized that after the next magnetic reversal (should "we" be around), we would call the North Pole the South - obvious, but weird nonetheless.I think we probably wouldn't. :)

After all, the reason it's called the North Pole is because the north pole of magnets are attracted to it. That, of course, means it's actually a south magnetic pole. Perhaps the cause of some early confusion in physics education nowadays. Flipping the Earth's poles would be an easy fix.

Chuck
2010-Aug-12, 04:06 PM
The real problem in facing Mecca will come when you're on a rotating space station that's orbiting the earth. The easiest situation would be if you're in Mecca or exactly opposite it on the globe where all directions are equally distant.

AndreasJ
2010-Aug-12, 08:34 PM
I think we probably wouldn't. :)

After all, the reason it's called the North Pole is because the north pole of magnets are attracted to it. That, of course, means it's actually a south magnetic pole. Perhaps the cause of some early confusion in physics education nowadays. Flipping the Earth's poles would be an easy fix.

That's backwards - we call the north pole of magnets that because it points (approximately) north. When the magentic field switches, it'd make more sense to rename the poles of a magnet than those of the Earth.

grapes
2010-Aug-12, 08:36 PM
The real problem in facing Mecca will come when you're on a rotating space station that's orbiting the earth. The easiest situation would be if you're in Mecca or exactly opposite it on the globe where all directions are equally distant.Not just in Mecca, in the Kaaba. And some people use great circles, some use rhumb lines.

HenrikOlsen
2010-Aug-13, 12:22 PM
That's backwards - we call the north pole of magnets that because it points (approximately) north. When the magentic field switches, it'd make more sense to rename the poles of a magnet than those of the Earth.

Or just, as is already to some extend done today through necessity, accept that the magnetic and geographic norths are far away from each other.

grapes
2010-Aug-14, 04:21 PM
That's backwards - we call the north pole of magnets that because it points (approximately) north. When the magentic field switches, it'd make more sense to rename the poles of a magnet than those of the Earth.Well, even if you rename them, the north pole of a magnet will still point to the south pole of another magnet--so, to be consistent, I think it would make more sense to leave all the names alone (after the geomagnetic reversal).

Extravoice
2010-Aug-14, 05:23 PM
On the day of my daughter's High School graduation, I told her that she was now ready to learn the truth.

The "Alphabet song" and "Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star" are really the same tune.

She paused for a moment, held her head and shouted, "Noooooooooo!"

Maybe she wasn't quite ready.

Extravoice
2010-Aug-14, 05:26 PM
One day, while sitting in my office alongside a British co-worker, he said, "I just realized that not only do you Americans say "aluminium" wrong, you spell it wrong, too."