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View Full Version : Antarctic Observatory Finds Weird Pattern of Cosmic Rays



Fraser
2010-Jul-29, 09:40 PM
From a University of Wisconsin press release: Though still under construction, the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole is already delivering scientific results including an early finding about a phenomenon the telescope was not even designed to study. IceCube captures signals of notoriously elusive but scientifically fascinating subatomic particles called neutrinos. The telescope [...]

More... (http://www.universetoday.com/69836/antarctic-observatory-finds-weird-pattern-of-cosmic-rays/)

trinitree88
2010-Jul-30, 08:06 PM
From a University of Wisconsin press release: Though still under construction, the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole is already delivering scientific results — including an early finding about a phenomenon the telescope was not even designed to study. IceCube captures signals of notoriously elusive but scientifically fascinating subatomic particles called neutrinos. The telescope [...]

More... (http://www.universetoday.com/69836/antarctic-observatory-finds-weird-pattern-of-cosmic-rays/)

Fraser. Interesting. I'd be very interested to see the whole sky map in the upcoming article. One can note however that the neutrino map of "warm" or energetic, and "cold" or less energetic, incoming neutrinos in the Southern Hemisphere, mapped by Ice Cube has a correlation to the 5th year WMAP hot and cold spots also in the Southern Hemisphere, dividing neatly in the middle. For an isotropic distribution, the Northern Hemisphere ought not to line up so, otherwise we have yet another "axis-of-Evil" of low statistical probability. I believe the "chance" alignment of the polarization stands at 9 sigma. pete

SEE:http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/cosmicvariance/files/uploads/ilc-5yr-hh-125.jpg

SEE:http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php/95976-CMB-aligned-with-ecliptic-poles-at-9-sigma?highlight=7+sigma

George
2010-Jul-30, 08:43 PM
Fraser. Interesting. I'd be very interested to see the whole sky map in the upcoming article. One can note however that the neutrino map of "warm" or energetic, and "cold" or less energetic, incoming neutrinos in the Southern Hemisphere, mapped by Ice Cube has a correlation to the 5th year WMAP hot and cold spots also in the Southern Hemisphere, dividing neatly in the middle. For an isotropic distribution, the Northern Hemisphere ought not to line up so, otherwise we have yet another "axis-of-Evil" of low statistical probability. I believe the "chance" alignment of the polarization stands at 9 sigma. pete

SEE:http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/cosmicvariance/files/uploads/ilc-5yr-hh-125.jpg

SEE:http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php/95976-CMB-aligned-with-ecliptic-poles-at-9-sigma?highlight=7+sigma
Not that I understand this stuff, but it looks like the anisotropy of the southern ACW signal is just about opposite that of this Ice Cube map, or is my east-west reversed because one is a mirror and the other a drilled block of ice? :)

trinitree88
2010-Jul-31, 04:49 PM
Not that I understand this stuff, but it looks like the anisotropy of the southern ACW signal is just about opposite that of this Ice Cube map, or is my east-west reversed because one is a mirror and the other a drilled block of ice? :)

George. In Fraser's image, the data indicate warm spot just South of the equatorial region, left of center.....WMAP 5 year shows same area warm spot just South of equator, left of center....and both show a cold spot just right of there. I'm not doing the statistics...I have a grandchild on the way. But, when the pros hash out the statistics, the correlation looks similar by eyeball to the WMAP polarization axis of evil from Max Tegmark years ago. pete

by George, I'll bet a hot fudge sundae it comes out correlated at 2-3 sigma. pete

Nereid
2010-Jul-31, 07:41 PM
George. In Fraser's image, the data indicate warm spot just South of the equatorial region, left of center.....WMAP 5 year shows same area warm spot just South of equator, left of center....and both show a cold spot just right of there. I'm not doing the statistics...I have a grandchild on the way. But, when the pros hash out the statistics, the correlation looks similar by eyeball to the WMAP polarization axis of evil from Max Tegmark years ago. pete

by George, I'll bet a hot fudge sundae it comes out correlated at 2-3 sigma. pete
Aren't the two maps based on different sets of coordinates? The WMAP uses galactic coordinates, the IceCube one RA and Dec?

If so, that'd make the comparison you've made, trinitree88, irrelevant, wouldn't it?

peteshimmon
2010-Jul-31, 09:31 PM
This reminds me of a map from that facility
I found in a magazine from 2003. It showed
neutrino hits for half the sky and the text
indicated the telescope was looking through
the Earth down to the equator. There was a
dense line of hits along the equator which
I took to be the Solar signal.

But what was puzzling was the lining up
along the equator, I would have expected
half an ecliptic curve. So the map must
have been normalised for the sky above
the ecliptic. But then the thing would
be looking through the Earth below the
equator for some data.

Sorry for this diversion but I'm still
slightly mistified.

Nereid
2010-Jul-31, 09:37 PM
This reminds me of a map from that facility
I found in a magazine from 2003. It showed
neutrino hits for half the sky and the text
indicated the telescope was looking through
the Earth down to the equator. There was a
dense line of hits along the equator which
I took to be the Solar signal.

But what was puzzling was the lining up
along the equator, I would have expected
half an ecliptic curve. So the map must
have been normalised for the sky above
the ecliptic. But then the thing would
be looking through the Earth below the
equator for some data.

Sorry for this diversion but I'm still
slightly mistified.
That map was, almost certainly, a zenith=pole/equator=horizon map, which may be what the cosmic ray map is too (except that its pole is the south pole, while the neutrino one is the north pole); the WMAP map uses quite different coordinates.

trinitree88
2010-Aug-02, 04:42 PM
Yep it would.

George
2010-Aug-02, 06:32 PM
Yep it would. Ok, then, I'll take the bet (assuming no coordinate adjustments are made). ;)

George
2010-Aug-02, 09:09 PM
I'm not doing the statistics...I have a grandchild on the way. BTW, Congrats! :clap: Is this a first? Is there a particle zoo nearby for his or her edification? ;)

trinitree88
2010-Aug-03, 11:00 PM
BTW, Congrats! :clap: Is this a first? Is there a particle zoo nearby for his or her edification? ;)

George. Thanks. Yep and nope. They're pretty nervous, but will negotiate this like billions of others. I didn't check the map coordinates in my eager post, but will in the article now that it's up....but I won't Welch on the bet, if I'm wrong you win a hot fudge sundae. I have to go shopping for noisy toys like drums/xylophone/clackers/.....etc. lol pete

George
2010-Aug-03, 11:38 PM
George. Thanks. Yep and nope. They're pretty nervous, but will negotiate this like billions of others. I didn't check the map coordinates in my eager post, but will in the article now that it's up....but I won't Welch on the bet, if I'm wrong you win a hot fudge sundae. I have to go shopping for noisy toys like drums/xylophone/clackers/.....etc. lol pete
I was just joking about the bet as I saw the circumstances taking a humurous turn, and you know me, when I see a turn, I take it. :) [When I see a fork in the road, I haven't quite figured out how to take those yet. :) Did Yogi?] Anyway, I don't wish to bet. [I'm trying to minimize my winning on technicalities, which I have managed to get lucky with at least once.]

Send us some grandkid pictures! I'll trade you with mine.