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View Full Version : which planets are the closest to see in the sky in our solar system?



Tenshu
2010-Aug-05, 01:48 AM
I've heard Venus and Jupiter are in close range par se (then again these claims come from people who claim them to be nibiru, Venus in the south and Jupiter in the north--;; )

Any other planets from our solar system in veiwable range.

CaptainXeroid
2010-Aug-05, 01:54 AM
In the eastern time zone, northern hemisphere at least, Venus is in the evening sky, setting around 10:30 PM, Mars & Saturn 10:50 PM Jupiter & Uranus rise around 11 PM. I couldn't spot Uranus with binoculars, but the rest are readily visible with the unaided eye.

Jens
2010-Aug-05, 01:55 AM
It's a bit hard to understand what you're asking. Do you mean, which planets are closest to the earth? The orbits of Venus is closest to the earth, followed I think by Mars, and then probably Mercury before Jupiter. But that's a guess. It always tricky because for example, Venus gets quite close to the earth at times but much further away when it is on the other side of the sun.

And for your other questions, all all the planets basically are in viewable range. The main planets (out to Saturn) are always in the viewable range, except when they're on the other side of the sun and can't be seen before of its glare. Neptune is never close enough to be seen with the naked eye, AFAIK.

And I don't understand what this has to do with Nibiru. . .

Swift
2010-Aug-05, 02:10 AM
I'm with Jens, I'm not sure what you mean. There is also currently a close grouping in the sky just after sunset of Venus, Saturn and Mars (thread about it (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php/105593-Summertime-Dance-of-the-Planets-Animation)). The appear close to each other in our view of the sky, but they are not physically close to each other in the solar system.

Tenshu
2010-Aug-05, 02:12 AM
well I had heard from a nasa article earlier in the month that several planets would be closer for viewing than they normally do, I was wondering which ones they meant so i could see them.

^as far as how Nibiru ties into this, a couple of austrailian's are claiming that they've seen a second sun in the morning hours where they live, and one of them won't back down from the claim either.

Swift
2010-Aug-05, 02:16 AM
I'm going to guess that the NASA article was referring to the group I mentioned - apparently close to each other in our view of the sky, but not closer to Earth or in physical location to each other. Do you have a link to the article?

Tenshu
2010-Aug-05, 02:18 AM
sadly to say i don't i'm sorry man.

by the by anyone on this site live in Austrailia by chance?

Jens
2010-Aug-05, 02:19 AM
well I had heard from a nasa article earlier in the month that several planets would be closer for viewing than they normally do, I was wondering which ones they meant so i could see them.

This is what Swift was talking about. Remember that planets being close in the sky doesn't actually mean they are close together.



^as far as how Nibiru ties into this, a couple of austrailian's are claiming that they've seen a second sun in the morning hours where they live, and one of them won't back down from the claim either.

So what? Sorry to state the obvious, but it's pretty easy to check. Go to bed early, wake up in the morning, and check out the sun. See if you see a second one. Surely, you must be aware that there are a lot of people in this world who work outside in the early morning. Don't you think they'd have noticed a second sun?

Jens
2010-Aug-05, 02:29 AM
by the by anyone on this site live in Australia by chance?

Yes, but I don't see why it would matter. Any object near the sun that is that bright would be very visible anywhere around the world.

Also, just something to think about. If a planetary object were to be as bright as the sun, it would have to be very close. But the planet is near the sun in the sky. So where is the light coming from? The sun's light should be coming from behind it, so we should be seeing it as a dark rather than bright object.

Tenshu
2010-Aug-05, 02:42 AM
thank you for proving that to me Jens, you and Swift are awsome beyond the cosmos

Swift
2010-Aug-05, 02:57 AM
thank you for proving that to me Jens, you and Swift are awsome beyond the cosmos
You're welcome, though my awesome rating barely makes it beyond the lily pad.

Jens
2010-Aug-05, 02:59 AM
thank you for proving that to me Jens, you and Swift are awsome beyond the cosmos

Really, really, really, I need to say that there is nothing awesome (well maybe Swift is, but I certainly am not). It's really just commonsense. You really should not worry about that kind of thing so much.

DonM435
2010-Aug-05, 04:21 AM
Venus should most often be the closest planet to Earth. However, when it's on the opposite side of the Sun, then Mars gets that particular honor.

And, when Venus is near opposition, Mercury must now and then steal the laurel.

How often and how long? (Have I overlooked anything?)

Tenshu
2010-Aug-05, 05:22 AM
if it were anyone else saying it i would've told them off, but because "nibiru" is supposedly going to show up in the southern atmosphere first (according to what those who believe it exists say anyway.) anyone who says something from down there tends to get my attention unfortunitly --;;

but Jens you and Swift have proven to me that even in the south it can't exist without the world as a hole knowing it, so therefore my mind is cleared^_^

Swift you can close this thread if you want too, i got the answers i came for so it's cool to close it.

AndreasJ
2010-Aug-05, 07:38 AM
if it were anyone else saying it i would've told them off, but because "nibiru" is supposedly going to show up in the southern atmosphere first (according to what those who believe it exists say anyway.) anyone who says something from down there tends to get my attention unfortunitly --;;
I think you mean "hemisphere". If it were in the atmosphere, we'd be seconds before impact!

Further, if the supposed object is anywhere close to the Sun in the sky, it'd be visible from the northern hemisphere. It should be better visible from the northern hemisphere as the Sun is still north of the celestial equator.

Tenshu
2010-Aug-05, 07:52 AM
^ I find it funny that despite astronomy from school, I don't remember that. man i'm stupid^^;

astromark
2010-Aug-05, 11:57 AM
No 'Tenshu' you are not... From my point of view at almost 40 deg South its mid winter and with settled clear skies

very good for observing the skies and the planets... Its not often that we see major planets so close to each other.

Just after sun set and looking West the Evening star Venus is very bright and easy to see. Those links provided above

Show the apparent positions for the early August period. Its not going to look like that again for a long time.

Remembering that It is not a planetary alignment. Just an apparent alignment. From our point of view.

This community ( Bad astronomy Universe today ) Has a very global view... We are everywhere.

Forget any talk of 'Nibiru.' Its not real. No such object is real. No such abject has been found.

We would know. We would be telling you. Its not and we are not.

On the 'heavinsabove' site you will find a solar system view of the planets positions in regard to Earth... well worth the look.

Peter B
2010-Aug-06, 04:09 PM
well I had heard from a nasa article earlier in the month that several planets would be closer for viewing than they normally do, I was wondering which ones they meant so i could see them.
There's an email which surfaces around this time every year claiming that Mars is amazingly large in the sky. But it's wrong as it's a bad copy of an original article that mentioned looking at Mars through a telescope.


^as far as how Nibiru ties into this, a couple of austrailian's are claiming that they've seen a second sun in the morning hours where they live, and one of them won't back down from the claim either.
Why not invite them here? Perhaps invite the one who won't back down to post a picture or two. That'd be interesting to see.

Peter B
2010-Aug-06, 04:13 PM
by the by anyone on this site live in Austrailia by chance?
Me for one.

And there are plenty of other Aussies here too.