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View Full Version : Was the Sun formed from one or several supernovas and why?



Trulialia
2010-Aug-15, 05:41 PM
I heard it was formed from one supernova, cause the Oort cloud has an even shape. Is it true?

baric
2010-Aug-16, 03:32 AM
Supernovas have two distinct effects:

1) ejecting gas and metals out to seed clouds for future star formation
2) leaving behind a dense non-fusing core


Our Sun formed from a gas cloud containing about 74% hydrogen, 24% helium and 2% heavier elements. The helium and heavier elements were directly created by earlier supernovas long before the Sun formed.

So in that sense, the Sun did indeed form from earlier supernovas. This would not have an effect on the shape of the Oort cloud, however.

caveman1917
2010-Aug-16, 08:38 AM
And there was something being suggested along the lines that a shockwave from a nearby supernova caused the initial collapse of the cloud that was bound to be the sun.
That would also have a supernova involved in solar system formation. But it too wouldn't have an effect on the Oort cloud.

astromark
2010-Aug-17, 09:20 AM
Was the sun formed from one or several supernova and why...?
I heard it was formed from one supernova, cause the Oort cloud has an even shape. Is it true?

An understanding of the manor and material that became the Solar disk has been a long and careful study.

By careful and painstaking work. Some real information has been attained. The shape of the Oort cloud is predictably uniform.

It is what is left of the material that has not been swept up or flung away... from it we have data... from all of this.

The ratio of gases, elements and, mass can and has been well calculated.

about 74% Hydrogen and 24% Helium and the metals add the other 2%...

Remembering that 98% of the solar disks mass is locked up in the Sun..

It would not be correct to make the statement that One Nova event resulted in this Solar disks formation.

Think of it as Sheparding... one of the component parts. Large quantities of hydrogen just accumulating quietly.

Then along comes some wave of mater expelled from a dieing star and it clumps it all up as you might imagine... and here we are...

astromark
2010-Aug-18, 07:40 PM
The 'why' is a little harder to explain. Bodies of mass suspended in the massive voids of open space slowly over billions of years.

( years being a human construct of time.) Are by the process of space distortion and displacement. Drawn towards other bodies of mass.

The more mass accumulated the greater that distortion effect. ( Gravity.) :eh: Thats the 'why' of it. Its the way it works. The rule.

AndreasJ
2010-Aug-18, 08:22 PM
I heard it was formed from one supernova, cause the Oort cloud has an even shape. Is it true?

Regarding the 2nd part of your question, the Oort cloud is made up of bodies that have been ejected from the inner parts of the Solar System wth a velocity just short of that needed to escape completely, and thereafter perturbed by the gravity of neighbouring stars. Its shape has no direct relation to what caused the Sun to form in the first place.

Glom
2010-Aug-19, 07:39 AM
It should be simple enough to work out how many supernovae contributed to the birth of the solar system. We have an idea of how much metal is in the solar system. We have an idea of how much metal we expect to be expelled from a supernova. We can look around for nearby supernovae remnants. Then work out how many of them it would take to deposit sufficient metal into the solar system.

AndreasJ
2010-Aug-19, 09:37 AM
It should be simple enough to work out how many supernovae contributed to the birth of the solar system. We have an idea of how much metal is in the solar system. We have an idea of how much metal we expect to be expelled from a supernova. We can look around for nearby supernovae remnants. Then work out how many of them it would take to deposit sufficient metal into the solar system.

How would you tell one nearby SN injecting lots of metals in the proto-solar cloud from many distant ones injecting a little?

Glom
2010-Aug-19, 10:04 AM
How would you tell one nearby SN injecting lots of metals in the proto-solar cloud from many distant ones injecting a little?

I said it was simple. I didn't say it was easy.

eburacum45
2010-Aug-20, 09:38 PM
Unfortunately we have travelled around the galaxy more than forty times since the Sun and the Solar System formed. If we were once near the supernova remnants that were active in forming our system they have wandered off long ago; we are unlikely to find them, but even if we do, we won't be able to find out how they were positioned in relation to each other four and a bit billion years ago.