PDA

View Full Version : Egg boxes



peteshimmon
2010-Aug-22, 07:34 PM
I have been thinking about egg boxes
recently. They do the job of keeping
eggs whole until they reach the shops
brilliantly and it is just waste paper.
Known them since I was a nipper and the
net indicates they were first around in
the thirties.

But I have just purchased a CCTV product
out of curiousity. The box was normal
but the components were in a papier mache
tray inside the box. So thats what they
are doing with all the waste paper that
goes back to the far east in containers!
It did the job of holding the camera and
components excellently. But I did expect
a plastic tray. The product was labled
as Workshop Tools which is some jusification
for "rugged" packaging I suppose. And most
will install the thing and throw the
packaging in two shakes.

Any other products coming in similar
packages these days?

NEOWatcher
2010-Aug-23, 04:29 PM
Any other products coming in similar
packages these days?
Yes;
I've seen it often enough that I don't even remember instances of it.
Generally, I see it when it's in a box with no windows to view the product.

Trebuchet
2010-Aug-24, 04:49 AM
Egg cartons in the USA these days are mostly styrene foam.

The "papier mache" you're referring to is almost certainly what I'd call "pulp". It's the raw material from which paper is made. And unlike the common styrene foam for these applications, I can toss it in my recycling bin instead of having it take up a huge amount of volume in the trash. I very much prefer it.

I actually purchased an industrial heat gun with the intention of seeing if it can cause styrene foam to shrink. Haven't tried it yet, however.

Ara Pacis
2010-Aug-24, 03:55 PM
The plastic trays that are inside windows cardboard boxes are usually high impact polystyrene (HIPS). Inside some corrugates boxes where no one looks prior to sale, you may find expanded polystyrene foam (AKA Styrofoam), and inside of sealed plastic containers, a similarly clear plastic insert is usually polyvinyl-choride (PVC). However, the clear package insert might be polyethylene terephthalate (PET), which is common for medical product container trays (often sealed with a cover of spun olefin fiber (AKA Tyvek).

A heat gun should shrink the expanded PS.

I've seen lots of electronic stuff come in the pulp formed trays in the last 10 years, like my cell phones.

peteshimmon
2010-Aug-24, 10:08 PM
I must try to purchase some more technical
goodies to further research this. The waste
paper also goes to make the overall packaging
and I usually admire the design. Two small
digital cameras I bought have neat flip-top
boxes that do to store the things rather
than throw them away. With clear plastic
trays of course, plush.

But brown pulp trays do seem a bit basic.
If they were a nicer colour...but then
that means bleach and dyes. No, I must
not complain. The economics of the waste
paper industry must be quite interesting
these days. There has always been a market
and industry. But now there is a flood of
waste paper looking for a destination. One
authority a few years ago started having
to store the stuff in warehouses. But
things have kicked back I understand.

Now my dilemma. Do nice people put used
toilet roll centres in the recycling or
in the general trash?

Trebuchet
2010-Aug-25, 01:42 AM
Now my dilemma. Do nice people put used
toilet roll centres in the recycling or
in the general trash?

I put them in the recycling if I'm feeling ambitious, but usually not.

In the past year or so we've been encouraged to put food waste, greasy cardboard (pizza boxes), used paper towels, and other previously non-recyclable stuff in the yard waste bin, so it can go to be composted. That might be a good option for the TP cores as well, since they've generally got a little of the paper left on them. I have to confess that I haven't used the "green bin" option as much as I could. It's a bit of a fuss to separate everything.

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Aug-25, 11:17 AM
Two words:wood stove.

Trebuchet
2010-Aug-25, 10:48 PM
Two words:wood stove.

One word: Illegal! It's actually against the law here to use anything but a "certified" wood stove and to burn anything other than wood in it. During inversions, you can't even use the certified stove unless you can prove it's your only source of heat.

HenrikOlsen
2010-Aug-25, 11:49 PM
Is paper considered not wood?

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Aug-26, 12:14 AM
One word: Illegal! It's actually against the law here to use anything but a "certified" wood stove and to burn anything other than wood in it. During inversions, you can't even use the certified stove unless you can prove it's your only source of heat.

How do you start the fire?

Trebuchet
2010-Aug-26, 01:49 AM
How do you start the fire?

Beats me. I have a pellet stove with an electric starter. They do have special wax/sawdust starters you can use.

And anyway, paper is not really a problem. I have a huge (90 gallon, IIRC) recycling bin and the same size yard/food waste bin. It's the dang styrene foam that bugs me.

Ara Pacis
2010-Aug-26, 05:40 AM
I've read that burning paper in regular fireplaces can cause the creosote to catch fire. I'm not sure if paper burns hotter or if it wafts up the chimney while still alight that does it.

HenrikOlsen
2010-Aug-26, 02:15 PM
Creosote? You mean the greasy black stuff you get in the chimney if the fireplace isn't burning optimally?
You can easily light that (and the soot) on fire by burning wood too.

Is isn't that the creosote catches fire because of the paper, but rather that the paper can burn in a way that cause creosote buildup in the first place.