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View Full Version : In Cold Blood - now with infrared



kleindoofy
2010-Oct-11, 10:21 PM
Infrared equipment can be used very well for tracking persons and animals at night. It can even be used to locate decaying cadavers and the like, i.e. anything that is warm. But I was thinking today that it might be pretty useless in tracking cold blooded animals.

My question: is this true? And, if a cold blooded animal were moving, would the heat generated by the energy conversion in the animal's muscles be enough to allow detection by sensitive infrared equipment? Would certain parts of the animals, e.g. the legs, emit a slight glow in infrared?

m74z00219
2010-Oct-11, 11:29 PM
Infrared equipment can be used very well for tracking persons and animals at night. It can even be used to locate decaying cadavers and the like, i.e. anything that is warm. But I was thinking today that it might be pretty useless in tracking cold blooded animals.

My question: is this true? And, if a cold blooded animal were moving, would the heat generated by the energy conversion in the animal's muscles be enough to allow detection by sensitive infrared equipment? Would certain parts of the animals, e.g. the legs, emit a slight glow in infrared?

Hi kleindoofy, I thought this link might be of interest to you.

http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/image_galleries/ir_zoo/

I'm not sure about tracking...some of these animals look to be very close to the same "color" as the chosen backgrounds. Though, perhaps with a sensitive enough imaging system, you could distinguish between the animal in the background as not everything in the surrounding environment will be radiating identically. I guess the question is, how sensitive and how practical.

M74

Trakar
2010-Oct-12, 01:33 AM
Hi kleindoofy, I thought this link might be of interest to you.

http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/image_galleries/ir_zoo/

I'm not sure about tracking...some of these animals look to be very close to the same "color" as the chosen backgrounds. Though, perhaps with a sensitive enough imaging system, you could distinguish between the animal in the background as not everything in the surrounding environment will be radiating identically. I guess the question is, how sensitive and how practical.

M74

Excellent site, thank-you! I've been trying to explain to my wife why our bearded dragons have to have it warmer than she enjoys and have to spend time under their basking lights before they get fed, the pictures have done better than my thousands of words!