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View Full Version : Underground Acquifers Fed Long-Lived Oceans, Lakes on Ancient Mars



Fraser
2010-Oct-19, 05:00 PM
Images from the spacecraft orbiting Mars seem to indicate the Red Planet may once have had oceans and lakes, and researchers are still trying to figure out how these bodies of water could have developed. A new explanation is that underground aquifers fed water to the surface, forming the floors of ancient continental-scale basins on [...]

More... (http://www.universetoday.com/76136/underground-acquifers-fed-long-lived-oceans-lakes-on-ancient-mars/)

trinitree88
2010-Oct-21, 04:12 PM
Images from the spacecraft orbiting Mars seem to indicate the Red Planet may once have had oceans and lakes, and researchers are still trying to figure out how these bodies of water could have developed. A new explanation is that underground aquifers fed water to the surface, forming the floors of ancient continental-scale basins on [...]

More... (http://www.universetoday.com/76136/underground-acquifers-fed-long-lived-oceans-lakes-on-ancient-mars/)

Fraser. I find it interesting that the iron-60 found in deep marine sediments on Earth is widely accepted as having it's origin in nearby supernovae from the OB association in Sco-Centaurus, but the Martian geologists think that could have happened unaccompanied by massive amounts of water, which is one of the ubiquitous molecules entrained in supernovae ejecta. That the ejecta reached Earth is the message in the marine deposits. Perhaps somone could elucidate me how that blast wave would reach the Earth without passing by and raining down on Mars? :wall: pete