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Gillianren
2010-Oct-26, 07:26 PM
Recently, the forward and back buttons on my mouse have been going more than one page at a time. It gets really irritating when I'm trying to do my normal internet activities. Does anyone know what causes this? Am I going to have to buy a new mouse to make it stop?

PetersCreek
2010-Oct-26, 07:40 PM
Your switches could be worn, causing them to send multiple clicks. Something else to try, though: see if your mouse has a proprietary setup/calibration utility. Most allow you to adjust things like double click speed. Perhaps yours will allow you to adjust the sensitivity of those buttons.

slang
2010-Oct-28, 12:02 AM
Microswitches, such as used in mice, do wear out over time, whether due to usage or dust. Perhaps finding a friendly neighbor and borrowing a mouse might be enough to rule hardware failure in or out.

Alternatively, get a cat. Ours bring new mice in all the time. Well, not new new. A bit worse for wear.

NickW
2010-Oct-28, 03:14 AM
When I first read the thread title, I thought she was having a problem with her MOOSE. Yikes!

Gillianren
2010-Oct-28, 06:00 AM
My cat has brought me mice occasionally, but they don't have the right wiring.

Oh, dear. So this probably means new mouse?

Trebuchet
2010-Oct-28, 05:37 PM
When we had outdoor cats, they would occasionally leave us half a mouse. On the newspaper on the front porch. Yuk.

I've only just recently disposed of several old mice unearthed in the desk archaeology project. Some probably even worked. I'll probably find more today, too bad I can't get them to you.

Tobin Dax
2010-Oct-29, 10:03 PM
My brain took an extra second to change gears when reading Treb's post above. I was creeped out for a second.

GeorgeLeRoyTirebiter
2010-Oct-29, 11:29 PM
Oh, dear. So this probably means new mouse?

That depends on your skill with a soldering iron.

Trebuchet
2010-Oct-29, 11:32 PM
Oh! It took me a second to see what happened there. And I only found one dead (computer) mouse in the latest desk. E-cycling center, here I come. (Pretty soon!)
Similarly, when I re-read one of my posts in the Desktop Archaeology thread, I realized my collection of chains, shackles, etc. might have sounded just a tad kinky! Not intentional, I assure you!

danscope
2010-Oct-30, 02:03 AM
Logitech optical mouse . Superb performance , no worries. That has been my experience.

Best regards,
Dan

Gillianren
2010-Oct-30, 02:40 AM
My budget will not extend to a $50 mouse any time soon, and that's the cheapest one they have that's both corded (my preference) and has forward and back buttons.

Fazor
2010-Oct-30, 03:42 AM
My budget will not extend to a $50 mouse any time soon, and that's the cheapest one they have that's both corded (my preference) and has forward and back buttons.
You need to look elswhere then. They're not that expensive. Amazon has some (here was my search (http://www.amazon.com/gp/search/ref=sr_nr_scat_11036491_ln?rh=n%3A11036491%2Ck%3Ao ptical+mouse&keywords=optical+mouse&ie=UTF8&qid=1288409929&scn=11036491&h=fc83a5f1472134b1243ce34a23dda86324dad7e0#%2Fref% 3Dsr_st%3Fkeywords%3D5%2Bbutton%2Bwired%2Boptical% 2Bmouse%26qid%3D1288410024%26rh%3Dn%253A172282%252 Cn%253A!493964%252Cn%253A541966%252Cn%253A172493%2 52Cn%253A11036491%252Ck%253A5%2Bbutton%2Bwired%2Bo ptical%2Bmouse%26sort%3Dprice&enc=1)) for under $10. Though, as with anything, I wouldn't suggest going with the absolute cheapest. But most of my mice have been right around $20 and been fine. I buy more expensive for gaming or digital art working, but for typical use, no reason to go expensive.

Gillianren
2010-Oct-30, 05:31 AM
Sure. I'm just saying that the recommended brand is out of my price range.

NickW
2010-Oct-30, 07:04 AM
Cords?! Ugh. I love my mouse, and I got it for free (perk of the job). Of course when the batteries start to die it becomes a little bit of a headache. I have an old optical mouse lying around though. I don't know if it has the forward or back buttons, but I would be willing to part ways with it.

Strange
2010-Oct-30, 01:00 PM
...and has forward and back buttons.

Oh, that's what they do! I had never even paid them any attention before.

WaxRubiks
2010-Oct-30, 01:50 PM
This happened to me and I bought the same model of optical mouse off ebay...and it still works after over a year...and it wasn't expensive.

Moose
2010-Oct-30, 01:52 PM
Gillian, so long as your right and left mouse buttons and scroll wheel are working as they are supposed to, might I suggest holding off on replacing the mouse and using the backspace key to back out of a page? (Or the arrows on top of your browser window if you don't want the keyboard close by?) So long as your mouse focus isn't in the quick reply box, backspace is equivalent. It's a bit less convenient, but it's cheaper than a replacement.

slang
2010-Oct-30, 02:35 PM
I've made myself get used to to the rightclick, select "back" or "forward" method of browsing through pages, while before I mostly used the alt-left or alt-right keyboard shortcuts. I don't remember why I started to use the mouse method more, it probably worked well with some dumb game. Anyway, there's more than one road to Rome.

Gillianren
2010-Oct-30, 06:48 PM
Cords?! Ugh. I love my mouse, and I got it for free (perk of the job). Of course when the batteries start to die it becomes a little bit of a headache. I have an old optical mouse lying around though. I don't know if it has the forward or back buttons, but I would be willing to part ways with it.

I don't want to replace batteries on it. I find it wasteful. This may in part be because the only cordless mouse I've ever used was draining batteries like crazy until I got fed up with it and insisted we switch. That may have improved; that mouse was probably eight years old. If that one has forward and back buttons, which I do use a lot, I would be perfectly willing to take it off your hands. I can deal for now--the forward button isn't all that broken, so if the mouse decides I want to go back four pages instead of one, I can usually get there for now. If a sub-optimal mouse were the worst problem I had, my life would be a whole heck of a lot better off.

danscope
2010-Oct-31, 03:21 AM
Tiger direct, logitech optical mouse..... $15 .

NickW
2010-Oct-31, 03:29 AM
The optical mouse I have in a box somewhere is not wireless. So no batteries there. My current one is wireless though, and I only have to change batteries once every couple of months.

Let me look through those boxes and see if I can find it. Like I said, I am not sure if it has the forward and back buttons. Ill let ya know.

Jeff Root
2010-Oct-31, 06:24 AM
Just found this thread.

My favorite mouse is a wired Logitech optical Wheel Mouse.
It is about a decade old, so the exact model is no longer
available. The model number on the bottom is M-BD58.
It has had problems. The feet were not glued on well.
I can imagine that it is hard to find a cement that reliably
glues a plastic that is intended to be highly nonstick, but
they should have found a solution by now! The left-click
button wore out, causing both non-clicks and double-clicks
like yours. I opened the case and glued a tiny bit of wire
onto the microswitch lever, which restored it. The mouse
has had an enormous amount of use, and I still use it on
the old computer.

For the new computer, I wanted to try a cordless mouse, so
I bought a Logitech MX 1100 Cordless Laser Mouse after I
decided to quit fretting quite so much about money. It cost
$69.99 plus shipping from a Florida outfit called thenerds.net.
I think that might have been $10 or $20 off the usual price,
but I don't remember. Shipping included a second item so
I'm not sure what it was. I got it in late April, 2009.

I found that the MX 1100 has several characteristics that I
don't like, but which might not bother you, as they are all
user-dependent:

- It feels heavy when I pick it up, even when only one
AA battery is installed (Two can be installed in parallel)

- The contoured shape makes the edge of the fingernail of
my little finger press against the finger next to it (ring finger?)

- The shape also lifts my thumb off the surface that the
mouse is on, making it harder to feel how far I'm moving it

- The mouse feels a bit large for my hand

- The load of extra buttons didn't do much for me

Earlier I bought a Logitech Marble Mouse, which is really a
trackball, not a mouse, in hopes that my parents would find
it easier to use than a mouse. I didn't find it easy to use and
I didn't get the impression that it was easier for them. Maybe
you will like it.

I want to find homes for both mice. They have hardly been
out of their boxes and are both super-clean. If you think you
might be able to use either-- or both-- you can have it/them.

I should have returned them, but just never got a round tuit.

I also bought a corded Logitech RX1000 Laser Mouse for $29.99
at my local neighborhood computer shop. It felt too narrow,
which is one reason I ordered the MX 1100, but I've been using
it for nine months, and I'm pretty much used to it.

The attachments are photos of the Wheel Mouse and MX 1100.
I don't know why an extra period appeared in each filename,
and I don't see how to change that.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

cjl
2010-Oct-31, 07:07 AM
Logitech makes one laser wired mouse with forward and back buttons for $35 on amazon - I don't know if that's still out of your price range, but it is one to consider. I've also had great luck with logitech.

AndreasJ
2010-Oct-31, 07:34 AM
When I first read the thread title, I thought she was having a problem with her MOOSE. Yikes!

I thought it said "A Problem With My Muse" and expected literary rather than technological woes.

Grashtel
2010-Oct-31, 11:12 AM
What browser do you use? Many of them support (natively or with an extension) mouse based control using rocker clicks or gestures making dedicated forward and back buttons unnecessary.

Hlafordlaes
2010-Oct-31, 12:01 PM
... My favorite mouse is a wired Logitech optical Wheel Mouse.
It is about a decade old, so the exact model is no longer
available. The model number on the bottom is M-BD58.


Using one now my own self. Good mouse, works. Tried wireless but not good for my Minesweeper scores; need wired for fastest clicking.

slang
2010-Nov-01, 02:34 AM
Assuming warranty ran out, you might consider opening up the mouse and cleaning any untoward stuff that might have accumulated around the microswitches (q-tips, compressed air can?). Perhaps it's just accumulated dust that prevents the lever from releasing quickly enough to prevent multiple hits. Maybe postpone this action until you have at least a somewhat usable backup mouse. ;)

(Jeff, that looks a lot like my favorite mouse)

Gillianren
2010-Nov-01, 03:58 AM
Jeff, one of those is cordless, which I don't like, and the other doesn't appear to have forward/back buttons, which I do, but thank you kindly for the offer.

I use Opera.

I have no idea when I bought the thing or from where, so warranty is irrelevant, but I might try that anyway.

Budget . . . well, when we figure how much of moving expenses which I paid will come out of the rent I pay Graham, I'll figure out my price range.

slang
2010-Nov-01, 08:21 AM
I don't know why an extra period appeared in each filename,
and I don't see how to change that.

That's a quirk that started showing up when the attachments started working again. I was so happy with the latter that I wasn't going to complain about the former. :)

DonM435
2010-Nov-01, 06:54 PM
I've found that the optical mouse can be fooled by the surface over which it's moving, with pattern, roughness and reflectivitry playing a part. You might try a different mousepad, or put something else on your desktop (the physical desktop, not some Window). Or did you change either of these recently and not realize it?

Gillianren
2010-Nov-01, 07:58 PM
Well, not right before the problem started. The problem started probably a couple of weeks afterward.

Jeff Root
2010-Nov-02, 02:03 AM
I expected you to say that the problem Don is talking about
is not the problem you're having. I had the problem Don
described when I changed several things at once. I assumed
it was the mouse driver, but it turned out to be the mouse pad,
which was lithographed. The pad must have been designed
in the age of mice with balls. It confused a neutered mouse.

For optical mouses, the other big cause of problems like Don
refers to is fur in the eye. Or lint or hair...

What did Mr. Jinx say?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Gillianren
2010-Nov-02, 02:21 AM
I do occasionally have trouble making the mouse move the way I want it to, and that is obviously something on the little optical sensor thingy. If that's the problem Don thinks I'm having, he is incorrect. However, my knowledge of computers is so limited that it could have had something to do with the problem I am having in a way I don't understand.

Mr. Jinx?

DonM435
2010-Nov-02, 03:00 AM
I've had occasions where the optical mouse responded badly on a shiny table top, but okay when I put a sheet of paper under it. Or vice versa.

Obviosusly, any build-up of dirt, lint, gunk, or crud (I think that "shmootz" is the technical term) over the sensor light is going to make things worse.

Gillianren
2010-Nov-02, 04:15 AM
"Schmutz" would be a more logical spelling, but again, it doesn't affect the back button.

slang
2010-Nov-02, 12:23 PM
"Schmutz" would be a more logical spelling, but again, it doesn't affect the back button.

You might be surprised how much schmutz manages to work its way into mice sometimes and mess with mechanical parts, the ball mechanism in old mice, the switches in opticals.

But you mentioned using Opera: that's the browser that "invented" mouse gestures (http://www.opera.com/browser/tutorials/gestures/) (or at least made them popular). Just click and hold somewhere in a webpage, and make a little twitch to the right or left to go forward or back. Or similar moves, and it may need to be enabled in the options. Worth a try, IMHO. Cheaper than a new mouse, and you might actually prefer it over seperate buttons. Even if you just use the gestures for forward, back, reload.

Jeff Root
2010-Nov-02, 06:45 PM
Mr. Jinx was the archenemy of Pixie and Dixie. He often
said, "I hates meeces to pieces!" He was a cool cat-- at
least insofar as that he talked like a bohemian (beatnik).

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

rommel543
2010-Nov-03, 06:43 PM
I don't know how many mice I've gone through. It's usually the plastic tab under the button breaks or the IC under the button wears out and no longer can make the contact any more. Like Slang mentioned though, you would be surprised (and probably disgusted) at the amount of stuff inside a mouse. All the dead skin, oils, dirt, dust, food bits, etc build up inside them. Same with keyboards.

IMO, buy a new mouse. You can get really good ones for around $30.

Jeff Root
2010-Nov-03, 09:24 PM
Two or three years after the modification to my old mouse's
left button that I just mentioned, I find that I need to re-do it.
I just opened up the mouse and found that the bit of material
I used wore out in the way I expected it would. I'll replace it
with something harder.

The wheel, which I hardly ever use, was covered with slime,
as I always find when I open the mouse. The same used to
be the case for mouse balls. Now it is the wheels. I presume
that the slime consists of bacteria. It looks almost like clear,
moderately viscous oil. I don't understand why it ends up all
over the wheel's plastic hub. It is not on the part of the rubber
rim that was exposed to the outside world. The part of the
rubber that was inside is tacky with the gunk, though.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

rommel543
2010-Nov-04, 05:56 PM
It looks almost like clear,
moderately viscous oil. I don't understand why it ends up all
over the wheel's plastic hub. It is not on the part of the rubber
rim that was exposed to the outside world.
-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

You sure that it's not a silicon lubricant that they put in them? When ever I had a problem and had to clean the mice it's a grey/brown stuff caked on the moving parts. I use a trackball mouse (http://ca.kensington.com/html/8967.html) and I have to take the ball out every once in awhile to clean the rollers inside. It's just lifts out so it's not a big deal, like the old roller ball mice.

Jeff Root
2010-Nov-04, 09:41 PM
I don't know that the slime is bacteria, but it certainly
isn't a lubricant that was originally in the mouse, because
I've taken it apart and cleaned it five or six times before.
I've been using it continuously for a decade or longer.

That should either induce Gillian to clean her mouse or
throw it away and get a brand new one. (When Gillian does
get rid of her old mouse, how will she dispose of it??)

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

slang
2010-Nov-04, 11:20 PM
That should either induce Gillian to clean her mouse or
throw it away and get a brand new one.

OR find a comfortable way of using the old mouse without using the faulty forward/back buttons.

Jeff Root
2010-Nov-04, 11:32 PM
You meant "AND", not "OR". Clean her old mouse AND find a
comfortable way of using it without the faulty button(s) (If it/they
are still faulty after cleaning and possible attempted repairs like
I'm doing to mine right now), OR get a new one.

Yes? No? Left? Wrong?

OR are you suggesting that she will find a comfortable way to
use her old mouse without looking inside to determine whether
it is full of slime?

OR are you suggesting that she will find a comfortable way to
use her old mouse after looking inside and finding that it is full
of slime, but not cleaning it?

OR are you suggesting that she will find a comfortable way to
use her old mouse after looking inside and finding that it is NOT
full of slime, so doesn't require cleaning?

Sheesh, so many permutations and combinations...

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Gillianren
2010-Nov-05, 12:41 AM
I can promise you that Gillian has no intention of taking her mouse apart any time soon. For now, the solution is "wait until either I get a used-but-functional one from a friend or find room in the budget to purchase a new one." Given that my monthly income just dropped 10%, I think we're looking at the former.

GeorgeLeRoyTirebiter
2010-Nov-05, 01:49 AM
I can promise you that Gillian has no intention of taking her mouse apart any time soon.

Ah, that's too bad. I've had some success with repairing faulty tactile switches while waiting for the replacement parts. A few times, all that was required was to disassemble and reassemble the switch—the contact area is so small that a spot of dirt or corrosion can interfere with it, and rotating the plunger plate will expose clean metal to the contacts. If you change your mind about fixing it yourself, I can write some instructions. No soldering, I promise.

Oh, and Jeff, I've never seen anything even remotely slimy inside a used mouse.

Gillianren
2010-Nov-05, 02:15 AM
Hmm. With computer things, it's that I'm afraid of screwing something up, and there's no way I can get by without a mouse. I looked at the bottom, and there appears to be only one screw in it. Is there anyone who thinks I might screw something up beyond repair? Because if consensus is that I can fix it, I may try.

Jeff Root
2010-Nov-05, 05:14 AM
The only possible danger that I see is to lose a tiny part.
The only part tiny enough to lose is a spring. Springs can
jump away when you pull apart the parts that hold them
in place. Putting it back together can go faster if you
notice and remember (or otherwise record) how you took
it apart, but I suspect that you'd be able to assemble a
disassembled mouse you'd never seen before.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

HenrikOlsen
2010-Nov-05, 07:26 AM
The other danger is to apply too much pressure and break something.

DonM435
2010-Nov-05, 12:40 PM
Those springs made of ultra-thin wire are incredibly sharp so be careful. I managed to put one right through a finger once. (Not all that bad -- the wound was so small as to be invisible.)

GeorgeLeRoyTirebiter
2010-Nov-05, 10:36 PM
I've never seen a modern mouse that uses lever-type microswitches with internal wire springs. Instead, they usually use tactile switches—small pushbutton switches with a combination plunger/elastomer spring. The scrollwheel assembly may use wire springs, but for this type of repair it probably won't need to be removed.

Donnie B.
2010-Nov-05, 11:57 PM
You might want to do a Google search on that particular model number. You may find that someone has posted disassembly instructions, maybe even with pictures. That can help you avoid problems.

You should also check for screws hidden under stick-on labels, such as those with the model and serial numbers. Manufacturers often cover the screws like that to discourage tampering (and make it apparent if it does occur during the warranty period).

Jeff Root
2010-Nov-06, 04:47 AM
The old mouse that I've disassembled several times has a
single screw holding the top and bottom together. I mentioned
the problem with springs particularly because this mouse has
two springs for the wheel, and both can inadvertantly come
out when opening the case. One spring makes the wheel
spring back up when pushed down as the middle button; the
other spring gives the wheel the ratchety feel when turned.
Getting the springs back in is a little bit tricky, but not life-
threatening, even to the mouse.

A story:

My friend has degrees in electrical engineering and computer
science. He bought me a TV/monitor that I could use with my
first computer (a Commodore) and with his Apple IIe, which he
was loaning to me for things that my computer couldn't handle.

About two days after we got it and set it up, he gave me a
program for the Apple. There were actually two programs in
a set-- one for drawing pictures and one for making animations.
He started the animation program. The picture on the monitor
was awful.

He said "Yechhh" and proceeded to take the monitor apart.
Once he had the case open, he broke the seals on the three
color focus rings on the back of the picture tube and proceeded
to adjust them. He got the picture fairly normal-looking, after
considerable trial and error.

The next day I read the instruction manual for the two programs.
The drawing program works in either regular monitor mode or in
RGB mode (requiring a different cable, plugged into a separate
input on the monitor). The animation program works *only* in
RGB mode. I spent the next couple of weeks trying to get the
adjustments back to the factory settings. Never quite got it.
For two days it worked great.

I finally took that TV/monitor to the county recycling center last
month, along with lots of other things that sat around here for
years, most of them disassembled.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

GeorgeLeRoyTirebiter
2010-Nov-08, 10:05 AM
I finally have some time, so, Gillian, here's the instructions just in case you decide to attempt it.

Tools you will need:
•A small screwdriver
•Tweezers
•An X-Acto knife, single-edged razor blade, scalpel, or similar

Tools you might need:
•A weak magnet
•A toothpick

Tools you should hope you don't need:
•Super glue or liquid plastic cement
•A new mouse (joking!)

It's good that you mentioned a visible screw on the underside. Like Donnie B. mentioned, they're sometimes hidden beneath labels or even the plastic "feet," but that one screw on your mouse probably holds the shell together. Start by removing it.

This should loosen one end of the shell. If so, pivot that end of the shell upwards until it separates from the base. If not, you'll have to look for hidden screws or tabs.

The side of the shell with the forward/back buttons may be a separate component. Examine it carefully for tabs, pins, or screws that attach it to the base. On my current mouse, it's removed just by gently pushing it outward.

Once you have exposed the circuit board, find the switches for the buttons that aren't working. Hopefully, they'll resemble this photo (http://search.digikey.com/scripts/DkSearch/dksus.dll?Detail&name=P10843S-ND): a small plastic box with a button on top, and a plastic or metal cap held in place by four flattened plastic retaining pins. If they instead have a metal cap that clips to the underside of the switch or is soldered to the circuit board then you likely won't be able to disassemble them.

If you can continue, you'll now need to remove the flattened part of those pins. Use the knife to shave the pins flush with the cap. It doesn't need to be perfect. For plastic caps, it's also OK to gouge any part of the cap that extends above the pins, but try not to cut down into the cap, as the plastic is rather thin there.

Start removing the cap by first carefully sliding the knife blade between the cap and the switch body on all four sides. Work your way around the switch, gently prying with the knife a little at a time, until the cap comes off. Be careful not to cut through those pins you just shortened—you still need them for when you reassemble the switch. Also, make sure that the mouse is set on a work surface instead of just held in your hand while you do this, to avoid accidentally spilling the insides of the switch onto your lap if the cap suddenly pops off.

With the cap removed, you can now get to the internals of the switch. There will probably be a plastic button on top, an elastomer spring/plunger below it, and on the bottom, a metal disc. You may need to remove these individually, or they might all stick together as you pull them out. If the disc remains inside the switch, the easiest way to remove it is with a magnet.

Check the contacts in the bottom of the switch body for dirt or visible corrosion. Scrub them with a toothpick if necessary. Examine the disc for damage or corrosion. Wild discoloration is normal; it's from the manufacturing process. The disc should be slightly domed, with the concave side facing the contacts. If it's bent, flat, or sombrero-shaped (I've seen it happen) then the switch is probably too far gone to save.

Installation is the reverse of removal.


Sorry, I couldn't resist.

It usually takes me a few tries to get the disc back inside the switch with the convex side up. Using a toothpick in conjunction with tweezers may aid in repositioning it (the toothpick also helps if your tweezers, like mine, have accidentally become magnetized).

With all of the fiddly bits back inside the switch, reattach the cap. There should be enough flare in the retaining pins that it just snaps back on (assuming that you didn't slice off the pins or break the corners of the cap when removing it). Take care to align the cap with both the pins and the button before you try to press it into place, otherwise you will likely cause the spring to toss the button onto the carpet (even if you don't have carpeting, hunting for small plastic pieces on the floor is never fun).

If, for some reason, the cap won't stay on, you'll have to glue it. I recommend super glue, although a suitable liquid plastic cement (not "airplane glue" in a tube) might also work. Don't apply super glue straight from the tube or bottle; make an applicator by bending the tip of a toothpick and put a small drop in the crook. Hold the switch cap in place (with tweezers) and apply a little glue to the top of the retaining pins, being careful not to slop any inside the switch. I will note that I've reassembled five or six of these switches and none have needed glue.

I find it's always a bit of a hassle to hook the mouse shell back onto its mounting tabs, so I can't offer any suggestions for that part. However, if you're the type who regularly cross-threads screws, I do have a tip for that: when starting the screw, gently press it into the hole while slowly turning it backwards until you feel it "click," then start tightening.

I hope I haven't made this repair sound too complicated. There is a small chance that you'll ruin the bad switch, but unless you're really ham-fisted it seems unlikely that you'll damage anything else on your mouse, and trying this is certainly cheaper than a new mouse. Good luck!

Gillianren
2010-Nov-08, 06:16 PM
Oddly, the problem seems to have resolved itself, or anyway I haven't really noticed it the last few days. But thank you all for your help and advice, and if it returns, I'll try following the instructions to fix the thing.

Jeff Root
2010-Nov-08, 11:10 PM
Problems coming and going, or changing in noticeability, is
something I've noticed a lot. Whether I do anything about a
problem or not, and nomatter what I do about it, I find that
understanding the cause is more satisfying than either having
it go away by itself or fixing it without knowing what I did that
fixed it. And it is almost invariably some tiny little thing.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

DonM435
2010-Nov-09, 02:09 PM
Oddly, the problem seems to have resolved itself, or anyway I haven't really noticed it the last few days. But thank you all for your help and advice, and if it returns, I'll try following the instructions to fix the thing.

The little e-rodent probably sensed your distress at having to perform on it the major surgery described above by GeorgeLeRoy, and decided that it had better shape up.

Donnie B.
2010-Nov-09, 03:57 PM
One alternative to disassembly for this sort of problem: just click that button a whole lot of times. That may wear away any contamination or oxide buildup on the contacts.

Naturally you'll want to do that when the computer is off or at least when not in an application that uses the buttons in question.

Jeff Root
2010-Nov-10, 06:35 AM
If the problem is like mine, it is wear of the switch. The fix in
my case is to add a tiny bit of material between the switch and
the part my finger presses on. While working on it, I plugged
in a cheap (between $10 and $20) mouse that I bought with
the intent of it replacing the Logitech Wheel Mouse. But it is
no good, so it only gets used for a couple of days while the
old one is in surgery.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis