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View Full Version : Taking Google too seriously.



Van Rijn
2010-Nov-09, 07:20 AM
I saw this article about an international incident due at least in part to some people using the (wrong) international border as shown in Google maps, and going where they shouldn't:

Google Map Glitch Ignites Costa Rica Incursion (http://technolog.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2010/11/08/5429289-google-map-glitch-ignites-costa-rica-incursion)

I don't want to get into the political side of it, obviously, but it's a good example of the dangers of relying too much on Google data. But it gets better! Later in the article, there is this:


On a less dramatic note, Google has misplaced several U.S. cities in the past. Most recently, the town of Sunrise, Fla. (pop. 90,000) went missing in September. While the fallout wasn't nearly as dire as an international error, it does illustrate how much of the world now depends on Google's virtual directions.

I think I'm going to mention this the next time somebody asks about a spot on Google Sky or Google Earth. Obviously, if they're getting borders wrong, misplacing cities and forgetting towns, it must be the work of aliens, or due to the close passage of a rogue planet.

slang
2010-Nov-09, 12:08 PM
Maybe it's their fault that Atlantis is gone too.

ETA: Hmm... (http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=nl&geocode=&q=atlantis&mrt=loc&sll=37.0625,-95.677068&sspn=49.57764,78.837891&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=South+Atlantic+Ocean&ll=-33.72434,-15.996094&spn=51.424519,78.837891&z=4) no streetview though.

kleindoofy
2010-Nov-09, 09:25 PM
I live about an hour away from Bielefeld (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bielefeld_Conspiracy), depending on how you see it. ;)

AndreasJ
2010-Nov-09, 09:28 PM
The reason Bielefeld was invented was to patch up an embarassing hole in Google Earth coverage.


Idaho doesn't exist either, that satellite had a bit of a temper.

rommel543
2010-Nov-09, 09:51 PM
If you're basing your military movements based on Google maps, I think that there are bigger problems at stake. I think they should put a disclaimer (maybe they do, I never checked) that the maps are for informational purposes only and should not be used for legal or governmental purposes including military troop movements.

Ara Pacis
2010-Nov-10, 05:14 AM
Hmmm, and here I thought it would be more difficult to take over the world. Apparently all I need to do is edit Google maps.

mfumbesi
2010-Nov-10, 11:51 AM
Hmmm, and here I thought it would be more difficult to take over the world. Apparently all I need to do is edit Google maps.

LOL..
I'm now the lord of New York, I've also renamed it Slightly Newer York.

Strange
2010-Nov-10, 01:08 PM
I guess the aliens stole Argleton: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argleton

HenrikOlsen
2010-Nov-10, 03:02 PM
For some reason I found the town of Romiley, supposed to be in Cheshire, stuck in the middle of the Irish Sea (http://maps.google.co.uk/maps?sll=53.800651,-4.064941).

rommel543
2010-Nov-10, 03:51 PM
For some reason I found the town of Romiley, supposed to be in Cheshire, stuck in the middle of the Irish Sea (http://maps.google.co.uk/maps?sll=53.800651,-4.064941).

I bet that commute is hell, although parking is great when you get there.

Elukka
2010-Nov-11, 12:32 AM
To be fair, since the error was apparently originally made by the US Department of State in the source materials it's not really Google's fault or the commander's for using Google.


If you're basing your military movements based on Google maps, I think that there are bigger problems at stake. I think they should put a disclaimer (maybe they do, I never checked) that the maps are for informational purposes only and should not be used for legal or governmental purposes including military troop movements.
You'd think so, but last I checked Google Earth (which uses the same database as Maps as far as I know) was advertising the pro version to various organization, including, you guessed it, militaries. Can't seem to find the site now, but it was definitely there a couple years back.

Ara Pacis
2010-Nov-11, 04:59 AM
I wonder if NASA and the ESA were using the google maps for their lost probes. Would explain a few things.

The Backroad Astronomer
2010-Nov-11, 05:15 AM
Today I was listening to Are We Alone and one of the interviewees was saying that google has to respect certain nations views of the world. China has a version of its borders and India has its' own while the rest of the world has a third.

99gecko
2010-Nov-11, 09:28 PM
Try getting directions from Japan to China. Google Earth will advise you to jet ski 782 km across the sea. Better fill up the fuel tank before you leave. Travelling from Australia to Japan it may suggest you kayak approx. 5400 km across the sea.

Noclevername
2010-Nov-11, 10:09 PM
I wonder if NASA and the ESA were using the google maps for their lost probes. Would explain a few things.

Well there's your problem! Disclaimer: Don't use Google Earth to find a spot on Mars! :)

Ara Pacis
2010-Nov-12, 12:12 AM
Well there's your problem! Disclaimer: Don't use Google Earth to find a spot on Mars! :)

Actually, I was referring to this: http://www.google.com/mars/

NEOWatcher
2010-Nov-12, 06:27 PM
Try getting directions from Japan to China. Google Earth will advise you to jet ski 782 km across the sea. Better fill up the fuel tank before you leave. Travelling from Australia to Japan it may suggest you kayak approx. 5400 km across the sea.
They got rid of that some time ago (along with the swim from Boston to Europe).
Now it just says they can't calculate directions.

jfribrg
2010-Nov-15, 04:30 PM
Maybe google is correct about the location of the borders, but due to the pole shift, the landmarks are different.