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Solfe
2010-Nov-11, 08:18 PM
I am writing a very tongue and cheek paper on plagiarism. I plan on arguing (against all sanity and reason) that plagiarism is good and that purchasing papers online good for the economy and produces quality results.

Here is where I need your help. Can anyone give an example of a website selling papers that meets at least one of the following criteria:

- Typos, misspellings or other errors on the website itself.
- Really old/outdated page info or bad website design.
- Example documents that include well known quotes or well known authors.
- Anything else thing that would warn a sane person to stay away from the site.
- Since this is a paper for school, please don't implicate yourself if you have used one of these sites.

I seriously intend to turn this paper in, so I must issue the following warning - I will have list you as a resource in my citation page and will have to provide a link to my teacher. I hope he joins the forum.

I prefer to use your BAUT name when citing you, but if you have an alternate identity you wish to have listed, simply leave it in your reply. These identities can be silly, but must conform to good taste (obviously...) ;)

Once I get a grade (about 12-18 days), I will post this paper online and put a link in this thread.

Thank you in advance.

Phil/Solfe

99gecko
2010-Nov-11, 08:33 PM
Why bother writing a paper on plagarism? Why not just copy and submit this one (http://custompapers.com/plagiarism/) as your own? [/joking]



- Anything else thing that would warn a sane person to stay away from the site.
Seriously, how about the site
http://effectivepapers.blogspot.com/ ,
which clearly states "Warning!!! All free online research papers, research paper samples and example research papers on any writing topics are plagiarized and cannot be fully used in your high school, college or university education." ?

Best of luck.

Fazor
2010-Nov-11, 08:39 PM
If you need another example about how plagarism helps the economy, you may wish to point out some of the current rumors surrounding Auburn quarter-back Cam Newton. Said allegations have helped feed starving sports-writers, who have been out of work since the world realized no one cares about Tiger Woods or LeBron James.

Gillianren
2010-Nov-11, 08:57 PM
It's "tongue-in-cheek."

It has been suggested to me that I could make a few bucks working for one of these sites, since it's not something you'd want to declare on your taxes anyway. I do know that, if a prospective employer in the writing field (journals, newspapers, and so forth) finds out you've worked for one, you can kiss any chance of a career there goodbye.

Jim
2010-Nov-11, 09:28 PM
Plagiarism is the sincerest form of flattery.

You can use that if you like. [/tongue-in-cheek]

Here are some links:
http://www.google.com/#sclient=psy&hl=en&q=term+papers+online&aq=4&aqi=g5&aql=&oq=term+papers&gs_rfai=&pbx=1&fp=5ddd74dd827ab059

tlbs101
2010-Nov-11, 09:32 PM
If you need another example about how plagarism helps the economy, you may wish to point out some of the current rumors surrounding Auburn quarter-back Cam Newton. Said allegations have helped feed starving sports-writers, who have been out of work since the world realized no one cares about Tiger Woods or LeBron James.

LMAO!!!!
----------------

To answer Solfe: The only sites I have seen with papers for sale are well presented, well contructed sites with human content/quality monitors and (from the few I have read) quality papers.
Note: I have never purchased or plagiarised a paper for any class. The WWW wasn't even around when I went to college and I didn't belong to a frat (that might have had old material to 'borrow').
I am currently taking a masters degree, online, and we have software to check for plagiarism. Even the stuff I write, cold, I will check against what's out there.
.

kleindoofy
2010-Nov-11, 10:05 PM
... plagiarism is good ... I will have list you as a resource in my citation page ...
Wouldn't that be defeating the purpose? Since when do plagiarists name their sources? ;)

Better yet, get someone here to write it for you, but don't say so.

Swift
2010-Nov-11, 10:23 PM
...and that purchasing papers online good for the economy
I would be happy to sell you a paper on this topic for US$25. http://www.uvtalk.com/images/smilies/money_02.gif

;)

Solfe
2010-Nov-11, 11:09 PM
My idea is that nothing original or more importantly, nothing good has been written in years. Therefore for the student should invest some time and money purchasing a paper that the teacher would enjoy reading rather than making the foolish mistake of trying to write something terrible themselves.

Of course, the logic behind this is really bent. The teacher could like it AND fail the student for plagiarism, which means the student should try harder next semester IE - buy another, better paper. Eventually the student will learn what the teacher likes and what papers are not notable enough to be recognized as plagiarism.

The goal is to make the teacher laugh at the distorted sort of logic students would have to use to purchase a paper, not to make light of plagiarism.

Ara Pacis
2010-Nov-12, 12:23 AM
I'm confused, what's this got to do with Darth Plagias and Star Wars? Oh yeah, there's some claim that Lucas didn't actually write it. If so, then plagiarism doth pay well.

ngc3314
2010-Nov-12, 01:36 PM
My eyes are still rolling from a snippet out of a recent student paper, in which two sentences from Wikipedia appeared without citation. How could I tell? They were in a different font and size than the rest of the text. (BTW, here on the other side of the state one hears a lot of Schadenfreude over anything that will slow down Cam Newton, but I did once catch a player here in a worse example sufficiently for it to be the last straw in the management suggesting that perhaps both his academic and athletic goals would be better pursued elsewhere. How badly does an Alabama football player have to mess up in the classroom to be tossed out?????)

Tobin Dax
2010-Nov-12, 11:41 PM
My eyes are still rolling from a snippet out of a recent student paper, in which two sentences from Wikipedia appeared without citation. How could I tell? They were in a different font and size than the rest of the text. (BTW, here on the other side of the state one hears a lot of Schadenfreude over anything that will slow down Cam Newton, but I did once catch a player here in a worse example sufficiently for it to be the last straw in the management suggesting that perhaps both his academic and athletic goals would be better pursued elsewhere. How badly does an Alabama football player have to mess up in the classroom to be tossed out?????)

I have seen that a number of times. I have also seen students in online courses copy something from Wikipedia and leave a link in the sentence, which I can then follow back to Wikipedia and find their uncited source. Those questions are easy to grade, more so if the student does this on multiple assignments.

slang
2010-Nov-13, 01:13 AM
My idea is that nothing original or more importantly, nothing good has been written in years.

I object to this terrible characterization of (not just my) posts here on BAUT!

kleindoofy
2010-Nov-13, 02:57 AM
... two sentences from Wikipedia appeared without citation. How could I tell? They were in a different font and size than the rest of the text. ...
That's just plain dumb.

Another thing I've noticed in a number of manuscripts in the last couple of years is that people copy online texts with all the hyperlinks included (they become imbedded in the MS-Word text). They don't seem to notice it.

Often enough it's perfectly legit, simply because they're quoting classical texts and don't want to re-type something that's available online for cut+paste, but the hyperlinks are very tell tale nevertheless.

jfribrg
2010-Nov-13, 05:39 AM
Plagiarism is the sincerest form of flattery.
Exactly. It is the pinnacle of one's work to write something so well that another person would be willing to have their name associated with it. Lesser researchers can only hope that one day their work will be plagarized as well.

Solfe
2010-Nov-13, 06:45 PM
When citing things in my own work, I like to use the "soft, inline credit":

"In the book <insert name>, So-and-so said the following..."
"To paraphrase <insert name>..."

Since I have to do a citation page anyway, if I miss something on it, I lose points to sloppiness rather than being accused of plagiarism.

As I am working this paper, I have decided to change course a bit. I am still going to use the really goof logic to show why someone would take something and plagiarize it, but there is a whole industry around this issue which I am going try to comment on in a humorous way.

To combat plagiarism from the internet, there are companies who create tools to put a stop to it. Basically the teacher or institution have such a wide array of sources to cover that it is typically not possible to do this without some sort of tool. If I found my teacher was plugging in text from my papers into google, I would feel rather bad for him. I am sure he does it on occasion but to work like that on a daily bases would be untenable. Of course, to prevent this sort of scanning there are essay writing companies that may provide unique papers, but I kind of suspect they have a big pile of papers on common topics and recycle them with a few edits at need.

This creates a sort of arms race, as the plagiarism prevention tools absorb more and more content to stop even the essay writing services from recycling. It is sort of like a zillion monkeys hammering out Shakespeare. Someday there will be a singularity event where the anti-plagiarism tools will contain all of human knowledge and will suddenly switch to an essay selling service. :)

What really fired me up about this topic is, some of these anti-plagiarism tools scan the web and force students to give up claims of ownership to one degree or another. From a student's perspective, I don't see a problem with this. The only point of writing these papers is to give them to my teacher. As an internet user, I also don't have an issue with this. I expect that this post for instance is freely accessible and usable by anyone on the web. There doesn't seem to be a value attached to it except for the purpose of having fun and communicating to users of this site. Outside of this site, it has no particular value or purpose at least to me. Where I do take issue with this as a website owner, these tools are scanning my work and stealing it for a for-profit purpose.

Of course, there is a small amount of silliness in this point of view. I bet not one of you could find my website and even if you did, I doubt very much that you would find anything interesting. I am certainly not the "wizard of web" making all kinds of money by sharing a tidbits of information with everyone else. I just object on principle.

If you can find my website, it is a terrible mess. No, in fact, it is a complete disaster. :) If you have any suggestions, let me know.

John Jaksich
2010-Nov-14, 10:51 PM
If you desire to be completely tongue-in-cheek--why not get a copy of well-known and highly cited manuscript; e.g. Ptolemy's: The Almagest ----substitute your name for Ptolemy and to add further insult to injury claim you are a time-travelilng shape shifter who has 23 personalities -- all of which are scientific geniuses? . . .

Solfe
2010-Nov-14, 11:24 PM
Ouch! That would be really amusing, but I suspect it is over the 5-7 page limit.

Jens
2010-Nov-15, 10:02 AM
I would suggest loading up the paper with aphorism-type things which are easy to spot as plagiarism, with no attribution. "Ask not what you can do for your career, ask what you can do for scholarship!" "I have a dream, that one day the students of the world will reject Wikipedia as a proper source for unattributed citation."

Solfe
2010-Nov-15, 10:01 PM
Hum... I have yet to use Wikipedia as a resource on a paper. I am actually quiet terrible about citations.

I write exactly to the length I need, then edit some stuff out. Once I am too short for the criteria of my project, I use google to find quotes that are vaguely close to each paragraphs topic and "plug and chug" them into the paper until I have a paper of correct length. If that doesn't work, I think about the music I listened to that day and plug in song lyrics and cite the cd lyrics sheet.

I am nothing if not creative.

kleindoofy
2010-Nov-15, 10:09 PM
... If that doesn't work, I think about the music I listened to that day and plug in song lyrics and cite the cd lyrics sheet. ...
That makes the best of papers, it makes the worst of papers.

It is a far, far better thing that you do, than we have ever done.

You may quote me on that, in fact you must. Never, ever plagerise!

Plagiarism causes acne. Really! Just go to any middle school and look around. Plagiarisers everywhere!

Solfe
2010-Nov-15, 10:30 PM
I would suggest loading up the paper with aphorism-type things which are easy to spot as plagiarism, with no attribution. "Ask not what you can do for your career, ask what you can do for scholarship!" "I have a dream, that one day the students of the world will reject Wikipedia as a proper source for unattributed citation."

Would you really expect a real citation on such recognizable things? They are actually hard to say without also saying "As JFK once said" or "In the immortal words of Martin Luther King Jr.".

Seriously... If I used something like that I would play it to hilt and cast it as a direct quote, which may or may not get a citation depending on if the gag is still working by the time I get to the citation page. Typically, such things add nothing of value and are just filler to hit a particular word or page count.

Maybe I stink as a student. :)

Gillianren
2010-Nov-16, 12:16 AM
Would you really expect a real citation on such recognizable things? They are actually hard to say without also saying "As JFK once said" or "In the immortal words of Martin Luther King Jr.".

Given that both JFK and Martin Luther King, Junior, often phrased things exactly that way, yes, I would expect a citation. I bring your attention to, from that very same speech, "In the words of the old Negro spiritual, 'Free at last, free at last. Thank God almighty, we are free at last.'"


Maybe I stink as a student. :)

That, I wouldn't know. But from the sound of it, you need to be more careful about your citations.

Solfe
2010-Nov-16, 02:57 AM
When I have citation page, I tend to over cite on that page and also try to make a softer citation in the sentence where the ideal was introduced.

Now, from this point forward, I will be bombastic.

My next paper has to have inline citation, which I hate. It destroys all flow.

When I look to write something, I tend to follow the format - generate an idea, read about it, rewrite/quote it, cite it, expand/exemplify/compare/contrast/etc. as needed to complete the paragraph. DO NOT on pain of death cite another person/work in the same paragraph unless absolutely required and no other way of closing the paragraph on topic exists. I am not saying don't cite someone, I am saying don't even put the idea in you can avoid it. I think that two cited ideas can't "live" in the same paragraph happily.

I am looking at an example of what is reportedly "good inline citation" that is actually horrid. The first paragraph has seven cited ideas compared to two new ideas by the author. Ick.

Ara Pacis
2010-Nov-16, 05:42 AM
Why not put different quotes in the same paragraph? I think it shows one to be fair and balanced. It's like saying, this is what these people think and i'm just the referee. Once they have beat each other up I feel free to combine their ideas wholesale into a third option. My professors seemed to like it, it made me stand out and made it clear that it was not possibly plagarized. I mean, how could it be, using the expert's words against themselves, and then showing how I am right and everyone else is wrong is my signature style. :D

grapes
2010-Nov-16, 06:05 AM
What really fired me up about this topic is, some of these anti-plagiarism tools scan the web and force students to give up claims of ownership to one degree or another. From a student's perspective, I don't see a problem with this. The only point of writing these papers is to give them to my teacher. As an internet user, I also don't have an issue with this. I expect that this post for instance is freely accessible and usable by anyone on the web. There doesn't seem to be a value attached to it except for the purpose of having fun and communicating to users of this site. Outside of this site, it has no particular value or purpose at least to me. Where I do take issue with this as a website owner, these tools are scanning my work and stealing it for a for-profit purpose.

Of course, there is a small amount of silliness in this point of view. I bet not one of you could find my website and even if you did, I doubt very much that you would find anything interesting. I am certainly not the "wizard of web" making all kinds of money by sharing a tidbits of information with everyone else. I just object on principle. Just put out the "no bots" sign. Otherwise, the default on the web is you want to be read.

Tinaa
2010-Nov-16, 12:40 PM
http://citationmachine.net is a great help for properly formatting citations.

jlhredshift
2010-Nov-16, 01:46 PM
If a particular sentence has been used in a book there is a good chance that GOOGLE BOOKS will pull it. They have managed to place into there archives both antiquarian and still copyrighted books in their entirety into their database, which amazes me. Just as a test I typed in a sentence from one of the current books that I am reading from 1972, just seven words, and GOOGLE BOOKS came back with one hit, the exact book, but since it was copyrighted still it only showed one part of the paragraph in which the quote was contained. Personally, I think that plagiarizing has already become a very risky thing to even contemplate.

Solfe
2010-Nov-19, 01:46 AM
http://citationmachine.net is a great help for properly formatting citations.

Sweet! That is the best tool ever!

Solfe
2010-Nov-21, 05:56 AM
I'm doomed!

I just received my grade for the last essay in this class and I got a B for mechanics and a B for content. It was a persuasive essay on scouting. I suggested that the solution to problems in 1890's with children (malnourished, unhealthy, too much rowdy dance hall music, too urban, etc.) was scouting (that was the purpose of the movement); and that it is a good choice for children today because they face similar issues.

I totally earned the B for mechanics... but I took a hit on otherwise good content for using a tautology and/or negating my concept on the first step and invalidated my case. 1898's children had a problem, 2010 children have the same problem.... either because they are the same thing and it is circular logic OR because the problem wasn't solved back in 1898 and it was a poor choice. I totally get were my teacher is coming from, but this is the one essay were fuzzy emotional appeals are acceptable if backed with data. I totally didn't expect to be torpedoed in/by my first sentence.

On the upside, I now know that if I approach my plagiarism themed paper with the deliberately off kilter logic I am going to take a serious hit. Something along the lines of "Mechanics B+, Good Job! You improved on your last paper." and "As for content, I laughed, I cried, I gave you an F. Son, you really need to follow directions."

So, I am going to call a close to my goof experiment and not write the silly paper I wanted too. Sorry.

In any event, I write way too fast so I have my second draft done (sans citations) and I will post that late December. It is not particularly funny, but pretty good. My third version, will be posted around the same time. This is the paper I needed to write, but didn't enjoy. Ugh.

Next time, I will look before I leap. :)





maybe.

novaderrik
2010-Nov-21, 09:53 AM
just print out the Wikipedia page on plagiarism and turn that in... it really seems like the most logical way to go about it.

oh, yeah- don't forget to print out the wikipedia page on citations (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chevrolet_Citation) and attach that...

grapes
2010-Nov-21, 05:14 PM
This is the paper you need: The Shadow Scholar (http://chronicle.com/article/The-Shadow-Scholar/125329/)

kamaz
2010-Nov-21, 10:04 PM
This is the paper you need: The Shadow Scholar (http://chronicle.com/article/The-Shadow-Scholar/125329/)

Heh. You know what I find really funny about this text?

1. Back when I was at school, we were constantly being told that in Western countries like the U.S. cheating does not happen, because people there have inherently higher ethical standards, and besides, the universities there treat it as a capital offense.

2. Apparently my command of English is better then that of U.S. college students (judging from the e-mails he quoted). Which is a bit strange, considering that the total time I have spent in English-speaking countries was maybe three weeks, and these people are supposed to be either native speakers or learning by immersion.

grapes
2010-Nov-22, 04:11 PM
Apparently my command of English is better then that of U.S. college students (judging from the e-mails he quoted). An unfair sample. I hope. :)

The last lines of the article:
So, of course, you can imagine my excitement when I received the good news:

"thanx so much for uhelp ican going to graduate to now".

Solfe
2010-Nov-22, 08:43 PM
Heh. You know what I find really funny about this text?

1. Back when I was at school, we were constantly being told that in Western countries like the U.S. cheating does not happen, because people there have inherently higher ethical standards, and besides, the universities there treat it as a capital offense.

2. Apparently my command of English is better then that of U.S. college students (judging from the e-mails he quoted). Which is a bit strange, considering that the total time I have spent in English-speaking countries was maybe three weeks, and these people are supposed to be either native speakers or learning by immersion.

What country are you from, certainly not Canada? :) That is a big whopper of a lie at least in part. I am 99.9% sure plagiarism is not illegal, but the issue is if you get a government grant or federally backed loans, there could be some really bad fall out for you.

Your writing is much better than many college students. I am really sure of that. :)

Gillianren
2010-Nov-22, 08:53 PM
What country are you from, certainly not Canada? :)

Hence "Western countries." Eastern Europe seems a logical guess.


That is a big whopper of a lie at least in part. I am 99.9% sure plagiarism is not illegal, but the issue is if you get a government grant or federally backed loans, there could be some really bad fall out for you.

Depending on circumstances, it can be illegal. Copyright infringement generally refers to piracy, but there are other types. Ask Michael Bay. Sure, it was a civil suit, but it made Robert S. Fiveson really like the fans of Mystery Science Theater 3000. Seems Bay's The Island had over a hundred points of similarity with Parts: The Clonus Horror, which had appeared on the show. I don't know anyone who'd seen the episode who didn't then hear the summary of The Island and say, "Wait a minute!"


Your writing is much better than many college students. I am really sure of that. :)

I'm not. It's good. But "much better" than "many college students"? I'm sure more effort is put into it given the setting, but it's hard to get into most colleges, at least most four-year colleges, if you can't construct a decent sentence.

Fazor
2010-Nov-22, 09:07 PM
I'm not. It's good. But "much better" than "many college students"? I'm sure more effort is put into it given the setting, but it's hard to get into most colleges, at least most four-year colleges, if you can't construct a decent sentence.

My college experience doesn't exactly agree with that point. I mean, heck, *I* got in. ;) But seriously, not only did I get in, but I tested out of first-year writing ... English composition? Or whatever the course was called. Now, the average writing ability in college was definitely higher than I've experienced in the real world (You should have seen the witness statements on an accident report I received today; lets just say one included the word "wreckt".) But though various group-projects, I can say that the level of English mastery wasn't all that high.

kamaz
2010-Nov-22, 10:13 PM
What country are you from, certainly not Canada? :)


Poland :)



That is a big whopper of a lie at least in part.


Well, I went to a technical university, so plagiarizing of M.Sc. theses was not a major problem, for the simple reason that most subjects actually required you to do some practical work. A minor problem was with people doing copy-paste on homework assignments. I think that the staff didn't really care, for one reason: there's absolutely no way you can write something creative about timing in Wi-Fi networks; either you copy it from the standard document itself, or from some book which itself copies from the standard. There were enough practical assignments to weed out people relying entirely on copy-paste anyway.

One thing however they were bent on eradicating, was cheating on exams. You see, over here it is considered good style to let the guy sitting next to you copy the answers. So we were sold lines that academic dishonesty is absolutely unheard of in the Western countries, which we should aspire to, etc., etc., etc.

...And now, years after my graduation grapes posts a text which makes my university look like a gold standard of academic honesty. I'm having a good laugh. Really.



I am 99.9% sure plagiarism is not illegal,


Copy-paste from someone else's work is a copyright violation and thus illegal, but it's entirely legal to hire someone to do the work for you and transfer the copyright. So we must distinguish between the two.

Interestingly, over here we have a law which says that deceiving a public official, or other authorized person, into issuing an untruthful document is a criminal offense, punishable by up to three years in prison. The interpretation is that when you present your thesis committee a thesis which was not written by you, you are deceiving them into giving you a degree -- which is a state-sanctioned document. So shadow writers have the client sign a disclaimer that they are aware of this law, and won't turn the thesis in as their own. However, I have never heard about someone getting sentenced because of this, although people do get caught now and then.



Your writing is much better than many college students. I am really sure of that.


Well; it has to be good enough to get past the reviewers in technical journals, and most of the time it does; sometimes I get back a list of minor corrections. A problem I have noticed recently is that I find statements like thanx so much for uhelp ican going to graduate to now to be completely incomprehensible. I've put years of my life into internalizing the rules of English, and that phrase violates so many of them that I have trouble guessing what it is supposed to mean. I have parsed this one into a puzzle made of thanx - can - graduate - now, which, thankfully, has only one solution. Problem is, with growing prevalence of that sort of language on the online forums (i.e. Youtube), I am starting to have problems actually understanding what people are saying.

And that feeling is very weird.

Gillianren
2010-Nov-22, 11:02 PM
My college experience doesn't exactly agree with that point. I mean, heck, *I* got in. ;) But seriously, not only did I get in, but I tested out of first-year writing ... English composition? Or whatever the course was called. Now, the average writing ability in college was definitely higher than I've experienced in the real world (You should have seen the witness statements on an accident report I received today; lets just say one included the word "wreckt".) But though various group-projects, I can say that the level of English mastery wasn't all that high.

I ought to have tested out of 100-level English entirely. I got a 5 on the AP English exam. And then I went to a community college where they'd never even heard of AP exams, so that cost me a bit coming and going. But I certainly don't equate the average American's writing ability and the average college student's writing ability!

Solfe
2010-Nov-22, 11:46 PM
About once every two weeks, I have a classmate email me (and the whole class including the teacher) about how to contact the teacher. Usually this comes on the day a project is due and the person is wants to know about this project they heard so much about so they can start. Vowels are optional as is polite language.

I have yet to see cheating on tests in college, but I have this great story about high school cheating. My friends Colleen, Joe and I had a final project that kept us from taking our language exams at the normal time. We were put into a math exam room. There was no hope of cheating as the other students were freshman and we were seniors. Joe was taking Latin, I had Spanish and Colleen had French so we would not be cheating off of each other. Or so you would think...

90 minutes into the test, Joe turns and asks me "What does carpe diem mean?" as if we were outside, in the rain, next to heavy traffic. It was so ridiculous, I just laughed at him. Colleen was so embarrassed, she tried to crawl under her desk. The proctor spoke to him about it and you would think he would have learned. He didn't. This time he turned around and asked the freshman behind him. The kid nearly died. Joe polled everyone with in earshot, including the proctor. This insanity went on until the proctor got extremely mad and sent for Joe's teacher. The teacher made everyone move away from him and stayed for the rest of the test.

Joe continued his shenanigans, only quieter. Finally, he stopped after I mouthed the words "Seize the day" to him four times. On the way out, he was all upset and said "That was the stupidest question ever. I wrote a whole page on "size the dog", whatever that means."

I am pretty sure the whole thing was an elaborate gag, but I can't be sure with that guy.

Gillianren
2010-Nov-23, 12:19 AM
Vowels are optional as is polite language.

Having optional vowels is just a recipe for confusion in communication. Look at translation issues from languages with no written vowels at all.

Solfe
2010-Nov-23, 12:50 AM
I believe the use of optional vowels has forwarded several "Stargate" plots. Daniel looks at something in a confused way then "oh... it is a instead O". Sort of like rotating the shields or reversing the polarity.

Jens
2010-Nov-25, 06:32 AM
Having optional vowels is just a recipe for confusion in communication. Look at translation issues from languages with no written vowels at all.

I'm not really sure what you mean. Don't Arabic speakers manage to read the Arabic without vowel marks with little difficulty?

Gillianren
2010-Nov-25, 06:34 AM
I'm more looking at the history of Biblical translation, which gets complicated because of those missing vowel marks. I can't speak to how well native speakers do or don't manage.

Jens
2010-Nov-25, 06:36 AM
2. Apparently my command of English is better then that of U.S. college students (judging from the e-mails he quoted). Which is a bit strange, considering that the total time I have spent in English-speaking countries was maybe three weeks, and these people are supposed to be either native speakers or learning by immersion.

I would point out, though, and I could be wrong, that I believe the person who was quoted in the article was not a native English speaker. Mistakes like "i can going to" seem like things a native speaker would never do, no matter how poor a writer. And we can assume the person may be learning by "immersion," but when I was a college student, I did occasionally meet students of certain nationalities who interacted almost exclusively with other students of the same nationality.

Paul Beardsley
2010-Nov-25, 06:57 AM
just print out the Wikipedia page on plagiarism and turn that in... it really seems like the most logical way to go about it.

Not quite. You get one of your siblings to do it.

This happened to one of my students. I'd tasked them with putting together a PowerPoint presentation. One student got her brother to do it for her. He copied and pasted the relevant Wiki article. Next day she "did" her presentation, which consisted of projecting it onto a screen, standing with her back to the audience and reading aloud all the stuff that we could see for ourselves. What was amusing was that she clearly hadn't even glanced at it before, and made no secret of her surprise at some of it.

Disinfo Agent
2010-Nov-25, 01:08 PM
What was amusing was that she clearly hadn't even glanced at it before, and made no secret of her surprise at some of it.Fantastic! :lol:

Sticks
2010-Nov-28, 02:33 PM
A discussion about presentation design tips has been split off into this thread (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php/109878-Tips-for-presentation-design)

John Smith
2013-Jan-09, 11:19 AM
It is the top of one's work to write a little so well that a different person would be willing to have their name linked with it.
Lesser researchers can only hope that one day their work will be plagiarized as well.

grapes
2013-Jan-09, 09:58 PM
Once I get a grade (about 12-18 days), I will post this paper online and put a link in this thread.
OK! Time's up!

Solfe
2013-Jan-09, 10:59 PM
OK! Time's up!

Well, I almost put this paper out of my mind. Let me start with the joke:

In conjuncture with this paper, I also had to turn in a daily journal every week. From this journal, my teacher was of the opinion that I was not developing a good paper and put a stop to it. The paper ended up being a very serious study of plagiarism complete with case studies and research papers cited, a survey of student's conducted by me, surveys of colleges (US and abroad), an interview with a person at iParadigms Inc (owners of Turnitin.com) and so on. All of this was documented in my journal so my teacher knew how my paper was progressing, step by step. This one document ended up being about 150 pages, typed.

The punchline: On the due date, the teacher turned on the iParadigms' TurnItIn dropbox. This was the first time we experienced this particular method for turning in papers, all other papers were apparently not checked for plagiarism. I waited until 11 pm to turn in my paper. It turns out that the TurnItIn Dropbox does not work with Linux. I couldn't turn in my paper because I didn't have the correct operating system.

(Edit - I was also not aware of this system nor its requirements. When I contacted them, Support merely advised that the problem was on my end and I was welcome to keep trying until time expired. I would be responsible for all problems with the system as it is offered without warranty. My teacher was the person who called tech support and received that answer that Linux was not an acceptable system.)

My teacher accepted the paper the next day. He was less than amused by this "feature" causing the rejecting papers. I got an A on the paper and in the course.

Since this has occurred, my stance on plagiarism has evolved and the basis of my paper is invalid. I had stated that in some select cases, plagiarism detection software might be useful. I find that this is not remotely the case now.

(For our UK users, I am of the impression that all levels of education mandate the use of this service. I am sorry, that must be a horrible waste of time, energy and money.)

Edit 2 - As I understand it, Turnitin.com now lists the valid operating systems and browsers at the outset. This was not the case in 2010.