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jlhredshift
2010-Nov-15, 11:40 AM
There is a woody bush that grows wild on our property, I have no idea what it is, but I have noticed that the squirrels and birds do not eat the red berries that are produced in great quantities. When the berries go to the ground they stay there and I can even find them still on the ground the following spring. The chickens will peck around them and I have even seen a chicken move a berry by its beak to get at seeds beneath. Having observed this I decided that sampling them was a bad idea and didn't. On the other hand the wild strawberries and raspberries disappear fast and it can easily be observed that the bunnies and birds take them. The cattle are fond of a quarter sized purple flower on a particular clover plant and I have sampled them, but there is nothing good or bad about the flavor, so I leave them for the cows.

Observation served our forebears well.

Trebuchet
2010-Nov-15, 07:25 PM
It might be interesting to take or send a sample to your agricultural extension service and see what it is. Might even be a listed noxious weed you need to get rid of.

jlhredshift
2010-Nov-15, 07:48 PM
It might be interesting to take or send a sample to your agricultural extension service and see what it is. Might even be a listed noxious weed you need to get rid of.

Not likely, they are everywhere a mower dares not to tread, fence rows, forest edge, and riparian settings.

PetersCreek
2010-Nov-15, 08:08 PM
Based on the brief description you gave, it sounds like something I have a bit of on my property: Red Elderberry (http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=SARA2). The berries are inedible unless cooked. Eaten raw, they can cause stomach upset, nausea, and vomiting. Other parts of the plant can cause cyanide poisoning.

jlhredshift
2010-Nov-15, 08:20 PM
Based on the brief description you gave, it sounds like something I have a bit of on my property: Red Elderberry (http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=SARA2). The berries are inedible unless cooked. Eaten raw, they can cause stomach upset, nausea, and vomiting. Other parts of the plant can cause cyanide poisoning.

Correct color and size of berries but these are singular and spread over the entire woody bush.

PetersCreek
2010-Nov-15, 08:31 PM
Ah...I suppose it was unrealistic to get a hit on just woody, bush, red, and berry.

jlhredshift
2010-Nov-15, 08:35 PM
I uploaded a pix to flikr:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/jlhredshift/5179790590/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/jlhredshift/5179855920/ (rotate 90 cw)

Strange
2010-Nov-15, 09:12 PM
Looks a bit like bryony: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Briony

ETA: just noticed that it doesn't seem to be native to the US....

jlhredshift
2010-Nov-15, 09:16 PM
Looks a bit like bryony: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Briony

ETA: just noticed that it doesn't seem to be native to the US....

My bush has lobate single leaves.

GeorgeLeRoyTirebiter
2010-Nov-15, 11:20 PM
It may be some form of honeysuckle (genus Lonicera). There are a few native bush-type honeysuckle species, but there are also several widespread invasive species that are considered noxious weeds (although not in Ohio), such as Lonicera tatarica (http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=LOTA).

jlhredshift
2010-Nov-16, 12:17 AM
It may be some form of honeysuckle (genus Lonicera). There are a few native bush-type honeysuckle species, but there are also several widespread invasive species that are considered noxious weeds (although not in Ohio), such as Lonicera tatarica (http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=LOTA).

I think you got it, looks good. But something named Honeysuckle doesn't sound nasty. Thanks.

John Jaksich
2010-Nov-16, 09:56 AM
If you are interested in its innate chemical properties --try to enlist a someone from a local college or environmental lab---to attempt to extract a sample of it with a low boiling solvent, filter it, ---put it on a GC-MS and see what comes up.

It would make a good project for a sophomore independent study.


I am sure that you are aware that very many commercial products started out that way.---in industry --that is.

swampyankee
2010-Nov-16, 11:11 AM
Not likely, they are everywhere a mower dares not to tread, fence rows, forest edge, and riparian settings.

That doesn't mean that it's not a noxious invasive.

Ivan Viehoff
2010-Nov-16, 11:18 AM
I think you got it, looks good. But something named Honeysuckle doesn't sound nasty. Thanks.
Don't think so. In Lonicera the leaves are opposite, ie, every leaf is paired with a second leaf growing out at the same point of the stem on the other side. Now a lot of the leaves of yours have fallen off, but from what I can see it doesn't look opposite to me. Also, there seems to be a group of about four or five leaves growing out at the same point in one place.

Gardening forums are a good place for plant id.

jlhredshift
2010-Nov-16, 12:31 PM
Don't think so. In Lonicera the leaves are opposite, ie, every leaf is paired with a second leaf growing out at the same point of the stem on the other side. Now a lot of the leaves of yours have fallen off, but from what I can see it doesn't look opposite to me. Also, there seems to be a group of about four or five leaves growing out at the same point in one place.

Gardening forums are a good place for plant id.

Ok, I am so bad (uneducated) in regards to botany that there are trees in my fromt yard that I have no idea what they are.

Ivan Viehoff
2010-Nov-16, 03:34 PM
Ok, I am so bad (uneducated) in regards to botany that there are trees in my fromt yard that I have no idea what they are.
That is a situation I would not be able to tolerate. I have to know what everything is. Though "weed" is sometimes a level of identification that satisfies me, while I pull it out. There are a few weeds in my garden I've never identified more accurately than that.

Why not have a look at this plant again next year when it is flowering. That's usually the best time to identify things, though for some plants fruits are more useful. Identification of plants that very rarely flower, such as bamboos, can bamboozle even the professionals.

jlhredshift
2010-Nov-16, 03:46 PM
That is a situation I would not be able to tolerate. I have to know what everything is. Though "weed" is sometimes a level of identification that satisfies me, while I pull it out. There are a few weeds in my garden I've never identified more accurately than that.

Why not have a look at this plant again next year when it is flowering. That's usually the best time to identify things, though for some plants fruits are more useful. Identification of plants that very rarely flower, such as bamboos, can bamboozle even the professionals.

I appreciate that and I have my own areas of interest that I feel the same way.

slang
2010-Nov-16, 04:28 PM
Though "weed" is sometimes a level of identification that satisfies me [...]

Me too, but then again, I'm Dutch. ;)

rommel543
2010-Nov-16, 07:44 PM
Prunus virginiana (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prunus_virginiana) or chokecherry. I grew up with them around our house in the country. Animals wouldn't eat them either. They have an extremely bitter flavor that leaves a dried, sour, 'need a drink' after taste in your mouth. They make good wine and jelly though.

jlhredshift
2010-Nov-16, 10:19 PM
Prunus virginiana (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prunus_virginiana) or chokecherry. I grew up with them around our house in the country. Animals wouldn't eat them either. They have an extremely bitter flavor that leaves a dried, sour, 'need a drink' after taste in your mouth. They make good wine and jelly though.

As Charlie Brown said "That's it".

I thank all of you for your input.

ETA: Did you say "wine"? Uhh.. I will have to look into that, I got lots of these plants scattered over 15 acres.

jlhredshift
2010-Nov-17, 01:44 AM
As Charlie Brown said "That's it".

I thank all of you for your input.

ETA: Did you say "wine"? Uhh.. I will have to look into that, I got lots of these plants scattered over 15 acres.

I'm going to redact the above, I think that my plant is the Choke Berry not choke cherry.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/cc/Choke-Berries-IMG_2431_051013_121714.jpg/220px-Choke-Berries-IMG_2431_051013_121714.jpg

and specifically: Red chokeberry, Aronia arbutifolia (Photinia pyrifolia)

Wiki link (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aronia)


The chokeberries (Aronia) are two[2] to three species of deciduous shrubs in the family Rosaceae, native to eastern North America. They are most commonly found in wet woods and swamps.[3][4][5][6] Chokeberries are cultivated as ornamental plants and also because they are very high in antioxidant pigment compounds, like anthocyanins. The name "chokeberry" comes from the astringency of the fruits which are inedible when raw. The berries can be used to make wine, jam, syrup, juice, soft spreads, tea and tinctures. The fruits are eaten by birds (birds do not taste astringency and feed on them readily), which then disperse the seeds in their droppings.

The chokeberries are often mistakenly called chokecherries, which is the common name for Prunus virginiana. Further adding to the ambiguity, there is a cultivar of Prunus virginiana named 'Melanocarpa',[7][8] easily confused with Aronia melanocarpa. Chokecherries are also high in antioxidant pigment compounds, like anthocyanins, further contributing to confusion. In fact, the two plants are only distantly related within the Rosaceae.

Rommell543: I think that is what you meant in the first place, my thanks still stand. I would not have gotten here without all your help.

rommel543
2010-Nov-24, 09:40 PM
I'm going to redact the above, I think that my plant is the Choke Berry not choke cherry.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/cc/Choke-Berries-IMG_2431_051013_121714.jpg/220px-Choke-Berries-IMG_2431_051013_121714.jpg

and specifically: Red chokeberry, Aronia arbutifolia (Photinia pyrifolia)

Wiki link (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aronia)



Rommell543: I think that is what you meant in the first place, my thanks still stand. I would not have gotten here without all your help.

Nope, Chokecherry...

From Wiki (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prunus_virginiana)(My Bold)


The Choke Cherry (Prunus virginiana) is a species of bird cherry (Prunus subgenus Padus) native to North America, where it is found almost throughout the continent except for the deep south and the far north.

...


Etymology

The chokeberries, genus Aronia, are often mistakenly called chokecherries. This naming confusion is easy to understand considering there is a cultivar of the chokecherry Prunus virginiana 'Melanocarpa'[2][3] and a species of chokeberry named Aronia melanocarpa.[4] In fact, the two plants are not close relatives within their subfamily Spiraeoideae.


Although it's very possible that your plants are Chokeberry, not Chokecherry. As previously suggested though I would get them tested prior to making any of said wine.