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naiveharry
2010-Nov-17, 10:32 AM
I have come to know about some section of Scientist that believe in Our Sun having a dark companion and being a binary star.
http://www.abovetopsecret.com/forum/thread540787/pg1
http://redxpro.com/articles/nsaie_1987.html

Does anyone have a explanation for Sedna's Orbit??

Daggerstab
2010-Nov-17, 05:33 PM
As one of the posters at Above Top Secret pointed out, a companion to the Sun has been hypothesized for a long time and part of the mission of the Pioneers was to find out if its was true. I think that the diagram in the encyclopedia describes the testing of this hypothesis: if there is a "dead star" or a tenth planet, its gravitational "pull" would affect the trajectories of the craft.

Wikipedia has a summary:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nemesis_(star)
Note that this is an unconfirmed hypothesis.

About Sedna, see the "Origin" section in its article:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/90377_Sedna#Origin

[Sedna's discoverer] Mike Brown and his team favored the hypothesis that Sedna was lifted into its current orbit by a star from the Sun's birth cluster, arguing that Sedna's aphelion of about 1,000 AU, which is relatively close compared to those of long period comets, is not distant enough to be affected by passing stars at their current distances from the Sun. They propose that Sedna's orbit is best explained by the Sun's having formed in an open cluster of several stars that gradually disassociated over time.

slang
2010-Nov-17, 09:41 PM
You might be interested in some research that puts a limit on unknown masses in our solar system. See here (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php/109155-What-is-the-nearest-Black-hole-that-is-closest-to-our-Star-System?p=1815941#post1815941).

Arneb
2010-Nov-18, 06:24 PM
Also, the discoverer of Sedna, alreadiy-mentioned Mike Brown, happens to be talking about Sedna and what it tells us right now (http://www.mikebrownsplanets.com/) - he interrupted his series for the Eris occultation, but you might be interested in following this miniseries.

naiveharry
2010-Nov-20, 07:45 AM
Thanks everyone for your replies.
@ Daggerstab,
I would say this, that wikipedia has recently lost all credibility in my eyes. It shouldn't be quoted in matters of science as it merely publishes the majority consensus and a bias associated with that.

AtomicDog
2010-Nov-21, 05:26 AM
Thanks everyone for your replies.
@ Daggerstab,
I would say this, that wikipedia has recently lost all credibility in my eyes. It shouldn't be quoted in matters of science as it merely publishes the majority consensus and a bias associated with that.

How is that different from, say, Encyclopedia Britannica?

Daggerstab
2010-Nov-21, 08:22 AM
I would say this, that wikipedia has recently lost all credibility in my eyes. It shouldn't be quoted in matters of science as it merely publishes the majority consensus and a bias associated with that.

I suggested Wikipedia as a summary accessible to a layman, not as an authority. In the case of Mike Brown's hypothesis about the origin of Sedna's orbit, Wikipedia provides a reference to Mike Brown's scientific paper. The reference links to a page that has a PDF with the full text of the article:
http://iopscience.iop.org/0004-637X/617/1/645/

Also, what Atomic Dog said. You question, "Does anyone have a explanation for Sedna's Orbit??", implied that you are interested if there is a mainstream scientific answer.