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Fraser
2011-Jan-08, 01:58 PM
The Crab Nebula is one of the most popular targets for astronomers of all stripes. It is readily viewable in moderate sized amateur telescopes and wows new viewers at star parties when they’re informed they’re looking at the remnant of a supernova that exploded in 1054 AD. The nebula is also a popular target for [...]

More... (http://www.universetoday.com/82301/crab-nebula-flares/)

trinitree88
2011-Jan-10, 03:19 PM
The Crab Nebula is one of the most popular targets for astronomers of all stripes. It is readily viewable in moderate sized amateur telescopes and wows new viewers at star parties when they’re informed they’re looking at the remnant of a supernova that exploded in 1054 AD. The nebula is also a popular target for [...]

More... (http://www.universetoday.com/82301/crab-nebula-flares/)

Fraser. Interesting.Those three flares are seperated by ~ 16 months twice, kind of like Old Faithful in Yellowstone. So, let's try the neck in the guillotine trick....should be another around January of 2012, just in time for the nutcases to predict the end of the world...:shifty::lol::naughty: pete
It also suggests perhaps a real periodicty. Technically there should be a temporal accumulation of neutrino energy, as pulsars have a mean free path of less than a few meters for neutrino scattering, but I'm thinking the proportion of energy radiated away comes predominantly from spin-down kinematics.