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Gamefreak89
2011-Jan-10, 11:34 AM
Ok I have another question what exactly is Strange Matter? Is it made from a neutron star or created in a large particle accelerator? Also what are the effects of Strange matter reacting to regular matter? Then of course what is Mirror matter? I've only heard of it once from a reference but couldn't remember what is was. I think it was another form of matter but similar to anti-matter can anyone shed any light on to this concept?

Hornblower
2011-Jan-10, 12:00 PM
Ok I have another question what exactly is Strange Matter? Is it made from a neutron star or created in a large particle accelerator? Also what are the effects of Strange matter reacting to regular matter? Then of course what is Mirror matter? I've only heard of it once from a reference but couldn't remember what is was. I think it was another form of matter but similar to anti-matter can anyone shed any light on to this concept?

I have never heard of either one. Could you give us some references?

tnjrp
2011-Jan-10, 12:23 PM
Wikipedia might be a good place to start:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strange_matter
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mirror_matter

See also:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strangelet

Both are quite hypothetical forms of "exotic matter" AFAIK.

Gamefreak89
2011-Jan-10, 12:46 PM
Yes I know I've read those a while back ago but they don't give me much insight on the subjects I just want someone to talk to someone who is more knowledgeable on these subjects.

Shaula
2011-Jan-10, 01:27 PM
What sort of insight are you after? But are speculative forms of matter, so the details of how they interact are not well pinned down. I'm no expert but have read a bit about both. Enough to know that you won't get exact answers to most questions on these subjects since there are probably N-1 theories of how they behave out there (where N is the number of research groups working on them!).

Gamefreak89
2011-Jan-10, 01:30 PM
The type of Insight I'm wanting is it actually possible or hypothetically possible to form strange matter from a large enough Particle accelerator? Then again Maybe Strange matter might actually form from Other types of stars, but since our satellites nor ground based telescopes can't see strange stars nor Neutron stars.

Shaula
2011-Jan-10, 02:39 PM
The problem is that, as has been said, the different and highly speculative theories disagree. If strange matter can only be stable under large pressures and in high energy densities then it is very unlikely we'd make anything more than fleeting observations of it. That is assuming that it is out there in the forms proposed. If it is actually the stabler form of matter then we could make some and have it around long enough to observe it. That is the trouble here: no one knows. There are a number of ideas floating around but too many unknowns to make firm predictions. We have issues solving QCD when it is non-perturbative, models break down or become intractable. And as an aside we have made direct observations of a neutron star. It looked like a dot :D

So basically the answer anyone would have to give to your questions is "Hypothetically it may be possible. But we have no idea what the odds are that we are right about this stuff. And no strong idea how it would actually behave."

trinitree88
2011-Jan-10, 03:30 PM
Strange matter contains strange quarks. "Regular" baryonic matter (you) contains just up and down quarks in your protons and neutrons. You have to add energy to ups and downs to turn them into strange quarks, and the resulting particles have short half-lives, decaying in know cascades with known branching ratios (see the Particle Data Group).
Mirror matter is antimatter, also well characterized by particle physicists, and there is no way to contain large quantities in a flask made of regular matter, as it will annihilate everything it touches....a problem beyond our engineering solutions. While Fermilab can circulate beams of counter -rotating protons and anti-protons , the total mass is less than that of an apple.

SEE:http://pdg.lbl.gov/2010/download/rpp-2010-booklet.pdf

eburacum45
2011-Jan-10, 04:18 PM
Actually mirror matter is an ambiguous term, as it can be used for antimatter (which Gamefreak69 may be acquainted with) and also used to describe a more speculative form of exotic matter which has never been observed.
see
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mirror_matter
it is described as 'parity reversed matter that does not interact strongly with "ordinary" matter' and is one of many candidates for Dark Matter. Whether or not it exists, or what it could be used for, I have no idea.

Shaula
2011-Jan-10, 05:46 PM
There is nothing that mystical about strange quarks though. They are just the most accessible of the higher generation quarks. Why don't people get as worked up about charmed matter? Or top matter? Or the other one. Which I cannot think of a way to name which isn't making me snigger.

trinitree88
2011-Jan-10, 08:43 PM
Actually mirror matter is an ambiguous term, as it can be used for antimatter (which Gamefreak69 may be acquainted with) and also used to describe a more speculative form of exotic matter which has never been observed.
see
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mirror_matter
it is described as 'parity reversed matter that does not interact strongly with "ordinary" matter' and is one of many candidates for Dark Matter. Whether or not it exists, or what it could be used for, I have no idea.

eburacum. Yep. Fair enough. I'll bet putative mirror matter is never found. Peanut butter and jellyfish sandwich. Goes right in there with polywater, phlogiston, caloric, and epicycles. But, I won't waste my breath stopping them from searching for it.

tnjrp
2011-Jan-11, 07:27 AM
There is nothing that mystical about strange quarks though. They are just the most accessible of the higher generation quarks.Hmm. I've assumed that there just is even less indication that other forms of quark matter actually can exist. The strange matter is as exotic as it gets, so to speak.

trinitree88
2011-Jan-11, 02:26 PM
Hmm. I've assumed that there just is even less indication that other forms of quark matter actually can exist. The strange matter is as exotic as it gets, so to speak.

They can exist if they are inside a neutron star or a white dwarf,but at sea level, and room temperature on Earth they only appear as transient phenomena in accelerator labs, or lightning bolts. The occasional cosmic ray might make some in the upper atmosphere....also transiently. pete

Shaula
2011-Jan-11, 09:51 PM
There is plenty of indication that all six quarks exist in particles we can make. Even if we hadn't seen stuff with them in they show up as second order terms in a lot of other things. We've seen charmonium and bottomomium IIRC. We've seen C, S and B mesons.

Gamefreak89
2011-Jan-12, 04:56 PM
They can exist if they are inside a neutron star or a white dwarf,but at sea level, and room temperature on Earth they only appear as transient phenomena in accelerator labs, or lightning bolts. The occasional cosmic ray might make some in the upper atmosphere....also transiently. pete

A white dwarf you serious? I never thought a white dwarf was possible of giving off such particles, and here I thought that white dwarf's doesn't give off any more heat nor energy.

Shaula
2011-Jan-12, 05:18 PM
They are not radiated by White Dwarves. Which, by the way, are very hot. And to reiterate - there is nothing particularly special about strange quarks. They are just heavier down quarks. They only weigh about 100MeV so might be light enough to be included as second order terms in the nuclear force. I haven't found any references to that - any particle physicists out there familiar enough with the residual force to give an answer as to how the mass of the mediating meson affects the probability of exchange?