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View Full Version : First Full Images of Endurance Crater



Tacitus
2004-May-03, 08:03 PM
First images of Endurance Crater posted:

http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/press/opportunity/20040503a.html

Looks like some of the nearer (upper) outcrop to the right might be accessible. At first glance it may not be worth going into the crater unless they want to get as close to the inaccessible outcrop on the other side as possible.

beskeptical
2004-May-03, 09:23 PM
Do we know yet how an impact left bedrock outcrops on its crater surface? Is there a bedrock all over under tons of dusty material? Why would it be uncovered on the crater's floor? Wouldn't it be more likely to fill up with dust and such?

aurora
2004-May-04, 02:10 AM
Do we know yet how an impact left bedrock outcrops on its crater surface? Is there a bedrock all over under tons of dusty material? Why would it be uncovered on the crater's floor? Wouldn't it be more likely to fill up with dust and such?

The bedrock appears in the crater walls, not on the crater floor.

Presumably, it is the same bedrock that was in Eagle crater, and it lies underneath the loose surface material at least from Eagle to Endurance.

The reason the bedrock is exposed is that the impact excavated the crater, and threw the material that used to be where the crater is now out and away.

Did that answer the questions?

brownpau
2004-May-04, 04:08 AM
Wiggled! (http://art.brownpau.com/wiggle/wigglemars49.gif)

Tom Ames
2004-May-04, 04:39 AM
Wiggled! (http://art.brownpau.com/wiggle/wigglemars49.gif)

Wow! What a phenomenal way to visualize these landscapes!

Mayito 777
2004-May-04, 12:09 PM
Guys what do you think about this picture

http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/all/1/n/095/1N136619354EFF2000P1985L0M1.JPG

Look at the bottom of the crater, to me seems like sand, now notice how it creeps up to the right side, could be ice????

jt-3d
2004-May-04, 02:16 PM
I don't think it's ice. Martian sand seems to have some weird clingy tendancies and it's hard to really decide what causes stuff like that. I think the whole place suffers from static cling.

CrzyWeazl
2004-May-04, 04:48 PM
Perhaps Mr Crater Snot ate Mr Bunny... Something to investigate!

Amadeus
2004-May-04, 07:30 PM
Mars never fails to surpise at every turn.

P.S Mr Bunny could take on Mr Crater snot any day of the week :D

beskeptical
2004-May-09, 05:56 AM
Do we know yet how an impact left bedrock outcrops on its crater surface? Is there a bedrock all over under tons of dusty material? Why would it be uncovered on the crater's floor? Wouldn't it be more likely to fill up with dust and such?

The bedrock appears in the crater walls, not on the crater floor.

Presumably, it is the same bedrock that was in Eagle crater, and it lies underneath the loose surface material at least from Eagle to Endurance.

The reason the bedrock is exposed is that the impact excavated the crater, and threw the material that used to be where the crater is now out and away.

Did that answer the questions?Well... I was wondering then how one gets bedrock on top of the layer of dirt or sand or whatever the 'not bedrock' stuff is? I know I'm probably just having trouble seeing some normal thing but it is confusing. I know when you look at eroding cliffs you get that rubble pile at the bottom with some name I can't think of now. But the bedrock chunks are on top of the rubble in a way that just doesn't look right. Well, I'm sure it will look different in the morning.......

btimsah1
2004-May-09, 06:42 AM
I'm gonna say it's frozen liquid and sand.

-Robby

Ut
2004-May-09, 02:02 PM
Frozen liquid...?

Maksutov
2004-May-09, 02:27 PM
Do we know yet how an impact left bedrock outcrops on its crater surface? Is there a bedrock all over under tons of dusty material? Why would it be uncovered on the crater's floor? Wouldn't it be more likely to fill up with dust and such?

The bedrock appears in the crater walls, not on the crater floor.

Presumably, it is the same bedrock that was in Eagle crater, and it lies underneath the loose surface material at least from Eagle to Endurance.

The reason the bedrock is exposed is that the impact excavated the crater, and threw the material that used to be where the crater is now out and away.

Did that answer the questions?Well... I was wondering then how one gets bedrock on top of the layer of dirt or sand or whatever the 'not bedrock' stuff is? I know I'm probably just having trouble seeing some normal thing but it is confusing. I know when you look at eroding cliffs you get that rubble pile at the bottom with some name I can't think of now. But the bedrock chunks are on top of the rubble in a way that just doesn't look right. Well, I'm sure it will look different in the morning.......

It's called "talus". In its unstable form, it's something of a bane to anyone who's climbed mountains.

Meteor impacts tend to expose bedrock. We need look no farther than Winslow, AZ, as shown here (http://neo.jpl.nasa.gov/images/mcrater1_s.jpg).

btimsah1
2004-May-09, 02:56 PM
Frozen liquid...?

Yes, a frozen liquid. I don't know what kind of liquid.

-Robby

Ut
2004-May-09, 03:33 PM
Frozen liquid...?

Yes, a frozen liquid. I don't know what kind of liquid.

-Robby

Allow me a brief moment of speculation here. I'm going to guess that it's frozen liquid rock...

jumpjack
2004-May-09, 05:57 PM
Frozen liquid...?

Yes, a frozen liquid. I don't know what kind of liquid.

-Robby

Allow me a brief moment of speculation here. I'm going to guess that it's frozen liquid rock...
...or frozen CO2, or frozed NH3, or frozen what-the-hell-I-know...

Jumpjack

beskeptical
2004-May-10, 01:02 AM
It's called "talus". In its unstable form, it's something of a bane to anyone who's climbed mountains.

Meteor impacts tend to expose bedrock. We need look no farther than Winslow, AZ, as shown here (http://neo.jpl.nasa.gov/images/mcrater1_s.jpg).Talus, that's the name. I think I'm having trouble with the term 'bedrock'. I never thought of sedimentary layers of rock as bedrock. Clearly my previous concept of bedrock was too limiting.

01101001
2004-May-10, 03:31 AM
NASA released this image recently, and hasnt this so called frozen liquid moved? Makes me think maybe it is sand..
-Robby
Have you considered that the rover moved? You can see its tracks here (http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/navcam/2004-05-09/1N137331283EFF2200P1988R0M1.JPG) as it performs its clockwise traverse around Endurance.

Robby? That name sounds familiar...

Edit: Um... that looks like a counterclockwise traverse. I thought Squyres in press conference said they'd do clockwise -- but then we all know I can't type and listen. Anyway, it appears to be counterclockwise (or anticlockwise for people who speak real English), moving to the right along the rim, unless clocks run backwards on Mars.

The Bad Astronomer
2004-May-10, 04:10 AM
Robbythewoowoo was btimsah1, who reregistered after I banned him. I deleted his posts. If he does this again, I will notify his ISP.

TravisM
2004-May-10, 02:07 PM
And those REAL english speakers spell realization with a 'Z', not an 'S', right? ;)