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glappkaeft
2011-Feb-22, 03:25 PM
Do BAUT have a policy on people asking homework questions? I have been hesitant to answer some questions partly because I feel that it could often be considered cheating if you help people to much with homework questions but also because I've not been sure if a policy exists.

PetersCreek
2011-Feb-22, 04:17 PM
There is no formal written policy, however, our custom and practice has been to not provide answers or otherwise do students' work for them. It's usually okay to help with underlying principles or point them to references but please do not "solve for x" or do anything else to make a teacher reconsider using this site as an educational resource. We want this site to be friendly to both students and teachers.

slang
2011-Feb-22, 04:25 PM
It is sometimes frustrating when you suspect something is homework, ask the poster if it is homework, and maybe give a hint to the right answer, and then someone else spells out the entire answer without waiting for the original poster to reply.

Jim
2011-Feb-22, 04:45 PM
Yeah... but they usually give the wrong answer, so it evens out.

DonM435
2011-Feb-22, 05:04 PM
That reminds me: Can anyone help? Who the dickens wrote "Great Expectations"?

Jim
2011-Feb-22, 05:15 PM
Well, you could probably look it up through Google or at your local library, but, hey...

Jay Gatsby. In fact, this work was considered so good, it won him the epithet "The Great Gatsby."

HenrikOlsen
2011-Feb-22, 05:56 PM
I though it was Edmond Wells, or is that Grate Expectations?.

baric
2011-Feb-22, 06:03 PM
That reminds me: Can anyone help? Who the dickens wrote "Great Expectations"?

KISS

Van Rijn
2011-Feb-22, 07:14 PM
That reminds me: Can anyone help? Who the dickens wrote "Great Expectations"?

Wasn't it Isaac Asimov? He wrote everything, after all. if you don't see his name on the cover, he's using a pseudonym.

Van Rijn
2011-Feb-22, 07:16 PM
It is sometimes frustrating when you suspect something is homework, ask the poster if it is homework, and maybe give a hint to the right answer, and then someone else spells out the entire answer without waiting for the original poster to reply.

I've occasionally had the situation where someone made it clear they were asking a homework question, and I gave a hint, then in checking the next day found somebody giving a full answer. That, I don't like.

kleindoofy
2011-Feb-22, 09:44 PM
... Grate Expectations?.
Or Grater Expectations?

http://piczasso.com/i/17c1m.jpg

DonM435
2011-Feb-22, 11:33 PM
Tiger Woods? No, that was Great Expectorations.

Tobin Dax
2011-Feb-23, 02:35 AM
I've occasionally had the situation where someone made it clear they were asking a homework question, and I gave a hint, then in checking the next day found somebody giving a full answer. That, I don't like.

(Maybe I should quote PetersCreek and slang, too, but I'm not making a long post.)

Neither do I. Unfortunately, some newer members seem to feel differently. Hopefully they will see this thread and take note.



Wasn't it Isaac Asimov? He wrote everything, after all. if you don't see his name on the cover, he's using a pseudonym.

Asimov made quite crafty of his pseudonym "Clarke." :)

Jens
2011-Feb-23, 03:51 AM
The problem is that sometimes it's difficult to tell. Sometimes a poster will ask a question in a way that makes it very clear it's a homework question, but then you have the more sophisticated people who ask: "I'm writing an SF story and I'm wondering how far from the planet. . ." But in general, I think it's best to give people information on how to solve a problem, not the solution itself. And this is in general, not just for homework questions, because it actually educates the poster.

HenrikOlsen
2011-Feb-23, 03:56 AM
Or Grater Expectations?
Please don't tell me it was actually possible to drop a Monty Python reference that wasn't picked up.

kleindoofy
2011-Feb-23, 04:03 AM
Please don't tell me it was actually possible to drop a Monty Python reference that wasn't picked up.
Ok, I won't. ;)

Hlafordlaes
2011-Feb-23, 10:42 PM
That reminds me: Can anyone help? Who the dickens wrote "Great Expectations"?

Hope someone answers. I myself am still trying to get my stein back from the guy who wrote "Of Mice and Men," at least that's what he claimed over beer. Lost sight of him after he hit the john. Uncannery.

Luckmeister
2011-Feb-24, 06:48 AM
Hope someone answers. I myself am still trying to get my stein back from the guy who wrote "Of Mice and Men," at least that's what he claimed over beer. Lost sight of him after he hit the john. Uncannery.

I went to that same bar. I used to enjoy watching my friend Ezra pound the drinks down in the spirit of romance.

Jens
2011-Feb-24, 07:04 AM
It was a really wild night; the guy who wrote Salome was also there.