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Matthias
2011-Feb-23, 11:55 AM
Suppose you built a starship which could artificially speed up local time, effectively allowing it to achieve a high velocity with respect to an external obsever, but within local space was travelling at conventional (non-relativistic) speeds. Referencing known natural laws regarding general relativity, what might be the observed effects of speeding up time in a local "bubble" of spacetime centered on our starship, with respect to the rest of the universe?

Tensor
2011-Feb-23, 04:47 PM
Suppose you built a starship which could artificially speed up local time, effectively allowing it to achieve a high velocity with respect to an external obsever, but within local space was travelling at conventional (non-relativistic) speeds. Referencing known natural laws regarding general relativity, what might be the observed effects of speeding up time in a local "bubble" of spacetime centered on our starship, with respect to the rest of the universe?

I'm not quite sure what you are asking, as just because time gets sped up (how? Don't know), doesn't mean that would translate into a velocity. However, I think this (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alcubierre_drive) might be what you are looking for. However, although it is theoretically possible, there are major, major problems with the actual physical conditions that it requires.

chinglu1998
2011-Feb-24, 12:59 AM
Suppose you built a starship which could artificially speed up local time, effectively allowing it to achieve a high velocity with respect to an external obsever, but within local space was travelling at conventional (non-relativistic) speeds. Referencing known natural laws regarding general relativity, what might be the observed effects of speeding up time in a local "bubble" of spacetime centered on our starship, with respect to the rest of the universe?

It is consistent with SR that you can move at high relative speeds where you an cross the universe in a short local time as long as you are fast enough.

You do not need GR as long as the acceleration is constant.

baric
2011-Feb-24, 04:39 AM
Suppose you built a starship which could artificially speed up local time, effectively allowing it to achieve a high velocity with respect to an external obsever, but within local space was travelling at conventional (non-relativistic) speeds. Referencing known natural laws regarding general relativity, what might be the observed effects of speeding up time in a local "bubble" of spacetime centered on our starship, with respect to the rest of the universe?

People inside the ship would age very quickly and die?

Bob Angstrom
2011-Feb-25, 04:21 AM
People inside the ship would age very quickly and die?They would need to slow down (not speed up) their time within the spaceship and thus live longer. As "chinglu" said this is a part of SR at relativistic speeds. The only difficulty is accelerating to the proper speed and the time dilation follows.

pzkpfw
2011-Feb-25, 05:47 AM
Bob Angstrom, how many times do you need to be asked not to answer for the OP of an ATM thread? (Rhetorical question not to be answered in-thread).

Shaula
2011-Feb-25, 08:20 AM
I'm currently trying to get funding for a ship run on just such a principle. In the engine the chief engineer (job already reserved) gets to do fun stuff throughout the whole flight, making time run more quickly for the back of the engine than at the front. The push from it trying to overtake itslf will generate free acceleration. In version two the engineering second (job available) will have to read endless findings reports from large QUANGOs which should slow down time at the front of the engine enough to allow near lightspeed travel.

Anyone got a spare few million?

Bob Angstrom
2011-Feb-25, 02:06 PM
Anyone got a spare few million?It may not take that much with Einstein's idea and I can suggest some former heads of state to "volunteer" for the hot coals.
“When you are courting a nice girl an hour seems like a second. When you sit on a red-hot cinder a second seems like an hour. That's relativity.” -Einstein

PetersCreek
2011-Feb-25, 11:48 PM
The ATM forum isn't really the place for a "What if you built a starship..." discussion. Thread closed.