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Cougar
2011-Mar-11, 03:15 AM
I just finished this book --A Tear at the Edge of Creation. That's tear as in rip. From the jacket, Gleiser has an endowed chair at Dartmouth College where he is a professor of physics and astronomy. The book was published in 2010, and the subtitle is A Radical New Vision for Life in an Imperfect Universe.

Radical, yes, in the sense that no other scientist has said these things. Well, he dedicates the book to Sagan, and he does carry on the theme of planetary preservation, but he's also very sensible and frank with his assessment of the position that the community of physicists and astronomers find themselves in post lambda. I thought the book was full of good points.

He also talks about life, how "intelligent life" might be pretty rare in the cosmos. For 150 million years this planet grew dinosaurs that never developed beyond... dinosaurs. Sure they were "intelligent" for what they did, but they never got into radio or spaceflight... or even telescopes. In contrast, I add from wiki: "Anatomically modern humans evolved... about 200,000 years ago. By the beginning of the Upper Paleolithic 50,000 years BP (Before Present), full behavioral modernity, including language, music and other cultural universals had developed.

To Gleiser, the ultimate symmetry, the notion of Oneness as Nature's unifying principle, the "Ionian Enchantment", the grandest unified theory that describes everything in our universe -- is never going to be "found" and may not even exist. It may be nothing more than a pythagorean myth, a platonic dream, perhaps bolstered by thousands of years of monotheistic culture. This makes particular sense since the only reason this universe containing matter even exists is not because of any perfect symmetry but because of a slight asymmetry in the quantum workings. As he puts it, "This imperfection is the single most important factor dictating our existence."

I could go on and on. I liked it. :)

Spoons
2011-Mar-11, 06:16 AM
That does sound interesting. Cheers Cougar!

astromark
2011-Mar-11, 09:34 AM
:razz:Yes it touches the subjects I find interesting...I will seek and find.A must have book. Thankyou..

Argos
2011-Mar-11, 08:38 PM
Great book. Marcelo does a wonderful job translating science for the masses. The Brazilian Carl Sagan.

Boratssister
2011-Mar-11, 10:00 PM
I just finished this book --A Tear at the Edge of Creation. That's tear as in rip. From the jacket, Gleiser has an endowed chair at Dartmouth College where he is a professor of physics and astronomy. The book was published in 2010, and the subtitle is A Radical New Vision for Life in an Imperfect Universe.

Radical, yes, in the sense that no other scientist has said these things. Well, he dedicates the book to Sagan, and he does carry on the theme of planetary preservation, but he's also very sensible and frank with his assessment of the position that the community of physicists and astronomers find themselves in post lambda. I thought the book was full of good points.

He also talks about life, how "intelligent life" might be pretty rare in the cosmos. For 150 million years this planet grew dinosaurs that never developed beyond... dinosaurs. Sure they were "intelligent" for what they did, but they never got into radio or spaceflight... or even telescopes. In contrast, I add from wiki: "Anatomically modern humans evolved... about 200,000 years ago. By the beginning of the Upper Paleolithic 50,000 years BP (Before Present), full behavioral modernity, including language, music and other cultural universals had developed.

To Gleiser, the ultimate symmetry, the notion of Oneness as Nature's unifying principle, the "Ionian Enchantment", the grandest unified theory that describes everything in our universe -- is never going to be "found" and may not even exist. It may be nothing more than a pythagorean myth, a platonic dream, perhaps bolstered by thousands of years of monotheistic culture. This makes particular sense since the only reason this universe containing matter even exists is not because of any perfect symmetry but because of a slight asymmetry in the quantum workings. As he puts it, "This imperfection is the single most important factor dictating our existence."

I could go on and on. I liked it. :)

I have always thought that perfection equals zero , which is balance , which is zero and its the journey to the balance where all the action happens, not the balance itself. Perfection is a flat line and that's not for me.
Thanks for the heads up on this book and I look forward to reading. All food for thought.