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jdake
2011-Mar-29, 03:44 AM
Does our motion through the universe actually affect our perception of time? The faster you move, doesn't time slow?

If we are on a rotating planet, which is revolving around the sun, which is revolving around the center of the galaxy, which is moving itself... does all this motion impact our perception of time as compared to how we might perceive time should we be at rest in space.

Two other questions arise from this thought for me. First, do we know how fast our galaxy is moving (which I guess would require some identifiable point of reference in space). Second, is there some consequence in time perception if an object were to come to absolute rest?

Sorry to turn this into multiple questions, but I am really interested in how our motion through space affects the rate at which we perceive the passage of time, if at all.


Moved to Q&A by Tusenfem

CaptainToonces
2011-Mar-29, 11:18 AM
You are thinking in absolutes when there is no such thing. Yes, the faster you move, time does slow. But the word "move" requires two points in space. There is no such thing as "absolute rest." You can only have something that is at rest with respect to something else. For example, your hand is at rest compared to your arm, so time is passing at the maximum rate between your hand and your arm.

There is no such thing as absolute speed in the universe. You only measure speed in relation to some other specific thing like the Sun or the galactic center. Adding those together does not describe an absolute motion through space because there is no absolute speed.

If you have an observer at each of the two points, they will observe different rates of time passing if the two points have motion with respect to each other. If the two points are at rest with respect to each other each point will observe the same rate of time passage, which is also the maximum rate of time passage i believe.

cosmocrazy
2011-Mar-29, 12:30 PM
Hi and welcome to BAUT.

Everything is relative,

As Captain Toonces said there is no absolutes of time, motion and speed. These can only be measured relative to something else. The motions and speed of our planet is measured relative to our sun and the solar system in turn is measured relative to our galactic centre and so on. Time can be measured differently between different frames. For example you would measure a different amount of time to have elapsed compared to someone in motion relative to you (the relative speed would have to be a lot greater than we tend to experience in every day life to be measurably noticeable though) but you both agree that time had passed by at a rate of 1 second per second, just not how many seconds had elapsed between measurements.

Cougar
2011-Mar-29, 01:24 PM
If we are on a rotating planet, which is revolving around the sun, which is revolving around the center of the galaxy, which is moving itself... does all this motion impact our perception of time as compared to how we might perceive time should we be at rest in space.

I assume you are talking about our perception of our own time, in which case the answer is NO. Such motion only impacts our perception of somebody else's time who is not on our rotating planet, or not revolving around the sun, or not revolving around the center of the galaxy. Time is relative. :)


Two other questions arise from this thought for me. First, do we know how fast our galaxy is moving.

Yes. Its velocity relative to the CMB rest frame is reported to be 552 km/s


Second, is there some consequence in time perception if an object were to come to absolute rest?

Well, there is no "absolute rest," only comparisons to something else. How do you tell who's moving and who's at rest? The only 'time consequence' is our perception of someone else's rate of time who is in a frame of reference different from ours.

WayneFrancis
2011-Mar-30, 01:21 AM
Does our motion through the universe actually affect our perception of time? The faster you move, doesn't time slow?

If we are on a rotating planet, which is revolving around the sun, which is revolving around the center of the galaxy, which is moving itself... does all this motion impact our perception of time as compared to how we might perceive time should we be at rest in space.

Two other questions arise from this thought for me. First, do we know how fast our galaxy is moving (which I guess would require some identifiable point of reference in space). Second, is there some consequence in time perception if an object were to come to absolute rest?

Sorry to turn this into multiple questions, but I am really interested in how our motion through space affects the rate at which we perceive the passage of time, if at all.


Moved to Q&A by Tusenfem


Yes and no. Yes it does effect our time in relation to other time but it doesn't effect our local perception of time. We'll always perceive time passing at a rate locally of 1s/s. We can look out into the universe and see things slower and faster then we'd expect if they where happening locally.

The difference, time dilation, between our time here within the galaxy and any other average spot in the universe is very small. I've done the calculations before but we are talking about 1 part in like 100,000,000 or ~1x10-8 give or take 1 order of magnitude. Very easily measurable but not really perceivable.
this is picking a spot in intergalactic space with zero motion in relation to the CMBR. I'll note this can be used as a baseline and it is just philosophical why you'd use this as the baseline over any other point within the universe

RAMS57
2011-Apr-05, 09:55 AM
Does our motion through the universe actually affect our perception of time? The faster you move, doesn't time slow?

If we are on a rotating planet, which is revolving around the sun, which is revolving around the center of the galaxy, which is moving itself... does all this motion impact our perception of time as compared to how we might perceive time should we be at rest in space.

Two other questions arise from this thought for me. First, do we know how fast our galaxy is moving (which I guess would require some identifiable point of reference in space). Second, is there some consequence in time perception if an object were to come to absolute rest?

Sorry to turn this into multiple questions, but I am really interested in how our motion through space affects the rate at which we perceive the passage of time, if at all.


Moved to Q&A by Tusenfem


You are stating a postulate that is answered this way. In Astrophysics two references are used: Apparent and Precise. Because the main vector of this is time, we only can then state by the observed. By that motion is irrelevant. Hope that is helpful.

Robert