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View Full Version : What Will Airplanes of the Future Look Like?



Fraser
2011-Mar-31, 09:40 PM
Will aircraft of the future look something like this? Project NACRE (New Aircraft Concepts Research) from has this wide-body aircraft in mind for future flyers, designed for long-haul flights and able to accommodate up to 750 passengers. Measuring 65 meters long, 19 meters high with a wingspan of nearly 100 meters, the maximum take-off weight [...]

More... (http://www.universetoday.com/84554/what-will-airplanes-of-the-future-look-like/)

danscope
2011-Apr-01, 02:35 AM
Hi, I think the Boeing " Blended wing " concept will be a natural progression in efficient design . If batteries/energy storage
improves like I should hope, the concept of electric hybrid aircraft propulsion would be a positive boon. Heavy aircraft use
tons of fuel just on take off and boosting to altitude. Employing electric storage for this would allow lighter, less robust
main engines for normal cruise at altitude. This along with the efficiency of the flying wing makes for lower cost flying with less oil ..... read " cheaper passenger miles " . All in good time .
Best regards,
Dan

Hernalt
2011-Apr-01, 05:55 AM
Reaction Engines Lapcat (http://www.reactionengines.co.uk/lapcat_veh.html) ??

jhwegener
2011-Apr-01, 07:16 PM
Imagine: If planes could pick up and deliver their load to the ground without really landing or stopping time and energy could be saved. In other words: A plane in "endless" fligth.

BigDon
2011-Apr-01, 07:31 PM
Imagine: If planes could pick up and deliver their load to the ground without really landing or stopping time and energy could be saved. In other words: A plane in "endless" fligth.

You mean a aircraft in a constant state of extreme wear?

danscope
2011-Apr-01, 08:56 PM
Seriously, when a commercial aircraft lands at an airport, there is a lot which happens to an aircraft. There is a list.
Things to check. Stuff.

swampyankee
2011-Apr-02, 12:21 AM
You mean a aircraft in a constant state of extreme wear?

Actually, a big chunk of the wear and tear on an aircraft is from takeoff and landing and the associated cabin pressure cycles. Cruising is pretty benign by comparison.

BigDon
2011-Apr-03, 06:45 PM
Actually, a big chunk of the wear and tear on an aircraft is from takeoff and landing and the associated cabin pressure cycles. Cruising is pretty benign by comparison.

I'll have to talk to my powerplants friends about that one. :) I know the Spruce Goose was designed so you can change an engine in-flight.

danscope
2011-Apr-03, 07:29 PM
I don't think you could change out an engine in flight. But a mechanic could pass through the wing and get to an engine for inspection .

Dan

jhwegener
2011-Apr-04, 12:35 PM
I don't think you could change out an engine in flight. But a mechanic could pass through the wing and get to an engine for inspection .

DanPerhaps not, but we can imagine an engine as a separate "module" or "unit, able to connect and disconnect itself to the "main" plane.

danscope
2011-Apr-04, 11:29 PM
Hmmmm...... at 200 miles per hour ? And take a look at a 2000 HP aircraft engine sometime. ......Heavy, isn't it ?
And a little complex. Takes a dock side crane.
The spruce goose would have been better with turbo-prop propulsion and a large Consolidated B-24 style tail configuration.
Even better, a canard configuration, to put the control surfaces in "clean air" and avoid the severe toroidial effects of the
8 engines on that puppy.

Dan