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Inclusa
2011-Apr-10, 06:54 AM
Let's talk about some of the repetitive games:
Real Time Strategy games:
Although good for training reaction time, they almost always feature unit building, unit diversion, stronger unit, etc. (Myth was a little "unique", since you are only given a certain number of units to defeat a certain number of enemies; than I can't handle the killing and the gore anymore.)
Role Playing Games:
You would look for the best equipments and skill sets possible. The "common" Chinese RPG games involve leveling by killing as many as possible (though this is somewhat "tamed" by "monster leveling"). I did admit that the "impossible without walkthough" games have lost their appeal to me.

(I am aware that hunting or fishing may be part of "Western" culture, but I don't enjoy anything that hurts lives directly now; most of the "ecological issues" come from our actions.)

vonmazur
2011-Apr-10, 07:16 AM
Yes: Many of them are the same old thing...Molochites or Mammonites...recruiting I guess..?? The only thing I have ever played that was not destructive was Pac Man.

BTW: As a combat veteran, I have no interest in "killing", or destruction any longer...I have observed that some people just love this stuff, but very few have actually experienced it first hand...Those of us that have, do not seem to be interested in such things....

A really good game would be something like railroad building or city designing or something useful and not destructive.

Dale

ravens_cry
2011-Apr-10, 08:22 AM
Well, such (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railroad_Tycoon) exist. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SimCity)
I play Pen and Paper Role Playing Games, like Dungeons and Dragons, and while Hack n' Slash is certainly an option, there are other ways to play.

Solfe
2011-Apr-10, 05:18 PM
I play Gemstones IV (an 18 year old MUD), which should be repetitive but some how it stays fresh. I do love a good turn burning game like Civ. When I am not socializing in Gemstones or turn burning Civ, I like to play pen and paper games.

To your point, Inclusa there are many games that break the repeat mold - Myst, URU, Obsidian, etc that become instant classics.

Solfe
2011-Apr-10, 05:29 PM
Rather than edit... I wanted to tack on another item about Gemstones IV. It is entirely text based, but you may be interested in the fact that it is possible to "Beat the game" without ever killing anything. They have a class called Empath that gains experience by healing instead of harming. It is hard to do, but you can make your first 10 levels by exploring, delivering messages, and mining, then move on to healing. You can also join a guild that will offer you tasks such as foraging for herbs, flowers and such and another guild that allows you to create weapons, shoes, arrows or magical trinkets for some experience.

Inclusa
2011-Apr-10, 08:59 PM
A really good game would be something like railroad building or city designing or something useful and not destructive.
That makes me think of games like Sim-City and Railroad Tycoon. Myst, URU, Obsidian; I didn't play them, but I heard of them.

Ara Pacis
2011-Apr-10, 11:12 PM
I am aware that hunting or fishing may be part of "Western" culture, but I don't enjoy anything that hurts lives directly now; most of the "ecological issues" come from our actions.

Actually, for many species, not hunting is more ecologically damaging.

Fazor
2011-Apr-10, 11:35 PM
Actually, for many species, not hunting is more ecologically damaging.

Right. Even cute-and-cuddly things like deer -- though you could argue that the over-crowding, over-population leading to desease and/or famine are caused first by our deforrestation and development.

Anyway; most games are repetative in some manner or another. To an extent, they should be. A game that introduces a new mechanic or new element every five minutes would be extremely hard for a player to follow. Even intra-genra titles need to keep some level of 'sameness' so that a player knows what they're doing when they pick it up.

ravens_cry
2011-Apr-10, 11:57 PM
Yeah, but MMORPG are repetitive in the extreme. They have to be because there is no way to make completely new and exciting content when you have players playing the game for months,even years. But the tactics companies use to keep players playing, despite the lack of fun, verge on the unethical (http://www.escapistmagazine.com/videos/view/extra-credits/2487-The-Skinner-Box).

Van Rijn
2011-Apr-11, 02:28 AM
Pong is extremely repetitive too. Arcade games are, in general, very repetitive, yet arcade games have been very popular.

SkepticJ
2011-Apr-11, 05:51 AM
If you don't like the games, why play them? There're plenty of other things you can do with your time.

I basically don't play video games anymore. I don't have anything against them; I mowed down game sprites by the tens of thousands back in my teens. Cost and change of priorities, I guess.

Some people go way too far with them, live them. World of Warcraft, what's the point? You're accomplished in a fantasy world, congratulations.

Tog
2011-Apr-11, 06:41 AM
Yeah, but MMORPG are repetitive in the extreme. They have to be because there is no way to make completely new and exciting content when you have players playing the game for months,even years.[/URL].

City of Heroes is probably in the best position to refute that.

A couple of years ago, they opened up a player created content tool that anyone could use. Players can create their own story arc, up to five "missions" long. The first week the system was in place players had manages to surpass the amount of content the developers had done in the previous four years.

The good arcs are as good or better than the best of the developer arcs. They've had "guest authors" from comic and fantasy writing come in and create content in the system as well.

But... Sturgeon's law applies. because it's an MMO, played by people who play MMO's a high percentage of the arcs are designed for max gain vs. time spent. Some of the early exploits could get a player all the way to the level cap in a few hours, not that there was anything to do after that.

Still, the number of arcs available is well over 100,000 at this point. Maybe closer to 200,000. It's hard to tell how many are actually active.

ravens_cry
2011-Apr-11, 02:53 PM
That hardly refutes it. You got thousands of people making new content, for free, compared to the developers in charge of that, developers who have to be paid. It still doesn't refute the next part of my statement, the rather nasty tactics used to keep players playing long after it really isn't fun. What makes this unethical for me is these are subscription based services. The longer the players play, the more money they make, even when the entertainment isn't doing it's job, being actually entertaining.