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brook
2011-Apr-17, 03:33 PM
Hello dear members :)

I read articles about new force of nature that some scientists from Tevatron collider are talking about. Let suppose that particle turns out to be real, How significantly will it change the standard model physics and Quantum physics? Which model is affected more? Even more, what kind of effect will it have on our whole understanding of the universe, Bing bang, dark matter, dark energy,...etc? I know it is just speculation but I couldn't help thinking about it. Please enlighten me as usual:) I am so benefiting from being in this group and am very thankful for all the members that kept me coming all the time:) The best group I have been in so far:) Thanks to everyone!!!

Shaula
2011-Apr-17, 06:33 PM
Links to the articles?

brook
2011-Apr-17, 06:58 PM
Links to the articles?

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2011/apr/10/new-force-of-nature-tevatron

brook
2011-Apr-17, 07:05 PM
Links to the articles?

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/06/science/06particle.html

http://arxiv.org/abs/1104.0699

csmyth3025
2011-Apr-17, 08:43 PM
Hello dear members :)

I read articles about new force of nature that some scientists from Tevatron collider are talking about. Let suppose that particle turns out to be real, How significantly will it change the standard model physics and Quantum physics? Which model is affected more? Even more, what kind of effect will it have on our whole understanding of the universe, Bing bang, dark matter, dark energy,...etc? I know it is just speculation but I couldn't help thinking about it. Please enlighten me as usual:) I am so benefiting from being in this group and am very thankful for all the members that kept me coming all the time:) The best group I have been in so far:) Thanks to everyone!!!
Assuming that this particle is real, we would first have to determine what kind of particle it is, what it's characteristics are and how it fits in with other known particles before any of your questions can be answered.

Chris

Shaula
2011-Apr-17, 10:18 PM
Yeah, I think the answer is *shrug*. It is exciting but at the moment it falls into the category of extraordinary claim. Even the researchers say that. It'll be fascinating to work out what effects it has on other particle interactions but the very fact that we haven't seen evidence of it before suggests a very weak force.