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ToSeek
2004-May-20, 05:52 PM
Halley's Comet Portrayed on Ancient Coin (http://dsc.discovery.com/news/afp/20040517/comet.html)


A rare ancient coin may feature an early record of Halley's Comet, researchers say.

The coin features the head of the Armenian king Tigranes II the Great, who reigned from 95 to 55 B.C. A symbol on his crown that features a star with a curved tail may represent the passage of Halley's comet in 87 B.C., say the Armenian and Italian researchers.

Master258
2004-May-20, 06:09 PM
Cool

Russ
2004-May-20, 09:06 PM
I am left wondering how, other than the supposed year, they decided it is Comet Halley. Perhaps it's just the reporters repeated reference to Halley's Comet (as apposed to the correct; Comet Halley) that makes me question credibility here but that may not be the historians' fault. There could well have been other comets within the supposed time frame. We have two right now, for instance. It might have been Comet Euclid or Plato for all we know. Yeah, I know, I know. :lol:



(edited to correct typos)

Charlie in Dayton
2004-May-20, 10:38 PM
The self-proclaimed StarGeezer, one Jack Horkheimer, gives a marvelous lecture about comets affecting our history by their being interpreted as portents...some of which are self fulfilling.

"It's a harbinger of doom, I tell you! Disaster is forecast for the house of Hassenpfeffer!" Local ne'er-do-well hears this, thinks it's a perfect time to relieve the Hassenpfeffers of large quantities of wealth. Presto -- the comet has foretold again...and on and on, into the deep dark reaches of history.

Mr Horkheimer gives a marvelous dated example from the Roman times, which was commemorated by putting a comet on one side of a coin. He has one of those coins, and after the lecture (the JREF's TAM1 in Ft Lauderdale) I got the cheap thrill of holding said coin...just a bit of ooky spooky, lemme tell ya... :o

StarStuff
2004-May-21, 04:25 AM
I am left wondering how, other than the supposed year, they decided it is Comet Halley. Perhaps it's just the reporters repeated reference to Halley's Comet (as apposed to the correct; Comet Halley) that makes me question credibility here but that may not be the historians' fault. There could well have been other comets within the supposed time frame. We have two right now, for instance. It might have been Comet Euclid or Plato for all we know. Yeah, I know, I know. :lol:


Actually, I was wondering the same thing. How DID they know that it really was that comet that was portrayed? :-k

I guess this reaction is to be expected, with all of us skeptics here on this board. :P

CJSF
2004-May-21, 02:16 PM
I am left wondering how, other than the supposed year, they decided it is Comet Halley. Perhaps it's just the reporters repeated reference to Halley's Comet (as apposed [sic] to the correct; Comet Halley) that makes me question credibility here but that may not be the historians' fault. There could well have been other comets within the supposed time frame. We have two right now, for instance. It might have been Comet Euclid or Plato for all we know. Yeah, I know, I know. :lol:


I was told by an several astronomers that comets named before the "official" comet {name} format can be "correctly" referred to by their old names. So Halley's comet is acceptible, since it has been called that since the 18th century.

CJSF