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View Full Version : 7 Horrible Ways The Universe can destroy us....



dirty_g
2011-Apr-20, 09:49 AM
Pulled off an article at cracked http://www.cracked.com/article_19117_7-horrible-ways-universe-can-destroy-us-without-warning.html

Enjoy reading it! As always it may contain offensive language being cracked an all. I found it funny myself though.
:lol:

publiusr
2011-Apr-20, 06:43 PM
That's a nice sci-fi episode right there at the end:
HPL and the Collapse of the Vacuum

Arneb
2011-Apr-20, 07:27 PM
I stopped reading when they said defibrillators are for strokes.

dirty_g
2011-Apr-20, 09:18 PM
I stopped reading when they said defibrillators are for strokes. That's a shame then. It's a good read even if they got the stroke bit wrong.

dirty_g
2011-Apr-20, 09:29 PM
Here is a good comment on that site in response to this article:
This is a seriously bad article. First the title is completely bull Language as we would know most of these are going to happen way before hand. Rouge stars and rouge black holes would show their effects on us long before hand because of the way they would start effecting the orbits of planets.
Number 5 is completely stupid. We know this is going to happen and even the article says its going to happen 3 billion years from now, not exactly instant. Plus its very possible are solar system could go through completely unscathed.
Number 3 is on a level of such stupidity, the writer must also think that the sun gives off cognitive radiation because he saw it on Futurama.
Cosmic background radiation is whats left over from the creation of the universe. Its completely harmless because we have a magnetosphere and an Ionosphere that protects us from those types of radiation. The ozone layer only absorbs UV radiation, from the sun and thats its primary purpose.
Number 1 sounds scary but really its no deferent than the sun kicking up a solar storm and knocking out our power, which mind you is way more likely to happen.
Seeing as how this guy used Wikipedia for all his info he could at least, try to double check his facts, before putting out idiotic articles that require him to receive a savage beating.
If you really want to think about some cosmic things that can cause some major Language kicking destruction with little warning then heres some good ones:
1.Undetected asteroid
2.Massive Solar Storms
3.Earth consuming solar flares
4.Pulsars

emmylou
2011-Apr-21, 12:46 AM
Hehe well I enjoyed it :p might not be right but hey if it give you a giggle why mock it ;)

Arneb
2011-Apr-24, 05:26 PM
Kind of "Death from the Skies", cheapo edition.

Trakar
2011-Apr-24, 06:49 PM
...Rouge stars and rouge black holes would show their effects on us long before hand because of the way they would start effecting the orbits of planets...

beware the red stars and, and,....okay which are they, black holes or red holes? I guess for a collapsed object that was just shy of a black hole you might have some infrared escape and thus a "rouge" hole, but I'm pretty sure that even quark stars would emit more than just IR. Maybe if we are lucky a rogue rouge hole will be found to study and we can resolve these issues properly.

(no malice intended)

Rouge = red
Rogue = Large, destructive, and anomalous or unpredictable
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/rogue

astromark
2011-Apr-25, 08:22 AM
Nil issue with your Rouge and Rogue use... and explanations. Good.

but sometimes just understanding what is being said is enough...

as, Black hole is a risk as is a red giant star...

Very different objects can both be a risk..

thats all the mentioning of them implies. That all that was meant.

Its a little petty to be so pedantic... we are not a class room and we are many cultures... and languages...

When talking of the ways we could be in danger from the Universe is open for much speculative discussion...

Thats all this can be... and it can be interesting to Learn what others feel is a risk.

You all know that driving and crossing the road are more likely to kill you than any cosmic danger...

and I must change my diet and exercise... looking into the sky for dangers is excessive paranoia.

BUT very good for fiction writers and film makers.

Glom
2011-Apr-25, 09:46 AM
A hypervelocity star would not look like the Comet Observatory.

theville24
2011-Apr-28, 12:59 AM
i thought it was funny reading!

Roger E. Moore
2011-May-19, 03:23 AM
I love this stuff! You can never kill off the universe too many times!

rednymph
2011-May-20, 11:40 AM
They say an asterod/comet with a 1 km diameter can kill us all. It would be big enough to crush the crust into the magma core, vaporize our oceans and basically just kill everyone. I know we can fancy with the idea that at least a few could survive. If they did, in such a scenario, how long woild they survive? I mean, in this persons lifetime, Earth will be hell. There is nothing to go back to that is worth it. Is it safe up in te mountains, or down in underground bases? How long could peole go by on storaged food and water? And with no electricity, how could they live in the dark? What about all those nuclear plants Being destroyed at once? The world would be a mess, wouldnt it? So, could we really survive such an impact? Should we even try, or should we just accept the end of humanity?

Astron
2011-May-20, 12:43 PM
I think it was obvious that the writer wasn't trying to be serious or scientifically precise so don't be strict :)
It was funny read.
Hi to all by the way.

Ilya
2011-May-20, 01:30 PM
They say an asterod/comet with a 1 km diameter can kill us all. It would be big enough to crush the crust into the magma core, vaporize our oceans and basically just kill everyone.

Which is very false. A 1-km asteroid would destroy a medium-size country if it hit land. If it hit ocean, itr would flatten every city on that ocean's coast. Very very bad, but not end of the world.


I know we can fancy with the idea that at least a few could survive. If they did, in such a scenario, how long woild they survive? I mean, in this persons lifetime, Earth will be hell. There is nothing to go back to that is worth it. Is it safe up in te mountains, or down in underground bases? How long could peole go by on storaged food and water? And with no electricity, how could they live in the dark? What about all those nuclear plants Being destroyed at once? The world would be a mess, wouldnt it? So, could we really survive such an impact? Should we even try, or should we just accept the end of humanity?
You are talking about effects of "dinosaur killer", or approximately 10-km asteroid. Yes, that would end civilization. Yes, there would be survivors. "Should we try?" is a pointless question -- it is statistically unlikely that any survivors would have read BAUT forum, and in any case it is a decision they would have to make for themselves. Throughout history people HAD survived through disasters just as bad -- of course they were local, not global, but for people at ground zero that made no difference (and sometimes that WAS all the world they knew). So my guess yes, within a few centuries humans would bounce back. Especially considering all machines and books which would also survive and be available to help "kick-start" civilization.

Trakar
2011-May-21, 05:36 PM
Which is very false. A 1-km asteroid would destroy a medium-size country if it hit land. If it hit ocean, itr would flatten every city on that ocean's coast. Very very bad, but not end of the world.

You are talking about effects of "dinosaur killer", or approximately 10-km asteroid. Yes, that would end civilization. Yes, there would be survivors. "Should we try?" is a pointless question -- it is statistically unlikely that any survivors would have read BAUT forum, and in any case it is a decision they would have to make for themselves. Throughout history people HAD survived through disasters just as bad -- of course they were local, not global, but for people at ground zero that made no difference (and sometimes that WAS all the world they knew). So my guess yes, within a few centuries humans would bounce back. Especially considering all machines and books which would also survive and be available to help "kick-start" civilization.

For the big rock impacts the key is the difference between ones that make a big local disruption and those that make a big enough local disruption that it shifts the planetary climate into a new state of equilibrium. The impacts are bad locally, but in those that majorly shift the planetary climate, it isn't the impact that does the most global damage it is the shifted climate which kills life on massive scales, and keeps killing it for decades to many 10's of thousands of years later.

Life that survives will serve as the stock from which nature will evolve biomes tuned to new environments, but things won't return to pre-event "normal," for most types of really big strikes. You may be talking decades before you could even successfully raise outside crops. Global Thermonuclear War would be a snap to recover from in comparison.

noncryptic
2011-May-22, 01:10 PM
Cosmic background radiation is whats left over from the creation of the universe. Its completely harmless because we have a magnetosphere and an Ionosphere that protects us from those types of radiation.

CMBR (the article links to the wiki cmbr entry) is generally not equated to "cosmic rays" as the author of the article does. The commenter seems confused by that.

For all i know Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation is of such low intensity and relatively low frequency that it is harmless to humans even without a magnetosphere and an Ionosphere.

"cosmic rays"/"cosmic radiation" is rather different than CMBR in that it does not consist of photons but of high energy charged sub-atomic particles, which is what makes cosmic rays harmful to life.

I suppose it means we should not take scientific information on a "humor site" seriously.

neilzero
2011-Jul-22, 02:16 AM
A 1 kilometer comet could kill people throughout a country but would do little damage to the rest of Earth unless it hit at more than 70 kilometers per second.
A 10 kilometer comet with 1000 times more mass would likely kill everyone = cube law..
8 or 9 kilometers = likely a very few survivors/ perhaps not enough breeding pairs for an other century or two. An iron instead of ice or gravel comet would be significantly more destructive.
If the "comet" came from outside our solar system we could get less than 7 years advance warning. None have come in the last century, except dust to house size. Perhaps none house size. The odds are about a million times a million to one for a city destroyed in 2018. The error bar on that guesstimate is about a trillion, which is to say, there it is an excellent chance Earth won't be hit even if a big one does come from outside our solar system. The other possible disasters are much less likely even for the coming million years. Over the next trillion years, an extinction event is all but certain, but we are sick in the head, if we worry about things that far in the future. Neil

Trakar
2011-Jul-23, 07:50 PM
A 1 kilometer comet could kill people throughout a country but would do little damage to the rest of Earth unless it hit at more than 70 kilometers per second...

a 1 km sized object strikes the Earth about once every 100,000 years, if that were a comet travelling at average deep space comet velocity (~70km/sec) we'd be looking at a volume of about 5.24*10^14c^3 and assuming an average mass density of about 1g/c^3 we get a mass of about ~500B metric tons and an impact force roughly equivilant to 300,000Mt of TNT. More than enough to cause planetary scale effects. Wouldn't be anything like the dinosaur slayer, but would definitely cause global problems and would probably be worse if it hit deep ocean than if it hit continental land.
The biggest problem I see with your consideration, is that you seem to be limiting your thoughts to only the immediate and direct impact event and energies. The effects of these energies as they spread throughout the planetary system, however, act as destructive multipliers. It would not at all be unreasonable to consider that such an impact might ultimately kill off most of our species, not in the initial impact, but over the following weeks, years and decades as the total cascade of effects from the impact play out and equilibrate throughout the planet's various systems.

closetgeek
2011-Aug-02, 01:38 PM
That's awesome. I have to send my friend the wiki link about the false vacuum. Like me, she dabbles but doesn't dedicate (the warning at the top of the article was for people like us) but she picks up on key words. That Science Channel show about colliding galaxies sent her into a depression, never mind the fact that we will be long dead (by a few billion years), she just heard "ripped apart". She really goes into a tailspin on shows about asteroids and rogue black holes. I can't wait to tell her that any second, the universe could theoretically collapse without warning.