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View Full Version : Free stereoviewer for color 3d images!



jumpjack
2004-May-25, 07:36 PM
I just invented a steroviewer which anybody can build by himself, even for free (if you already have required material).

Please take a look at my page (http://www.geocities.com/lcassioli/stereoviewer/index.html) and let me know what you think of it.

You can use this equipment even to view 3d image ON YOUR MONITOR, without even printing them! :D

dummy
2004-May-25, 08:58 PM
Cool idea :). Another more crude way is to just use two cardboard tubes.

I think I'll stick to my LCD shutter glasses though :o

jumpjack
2004-May-26, 06:58 AM
Cool idea :). Another more crude way is to just use two cardboard tubes.

Quite "headaching", I suppose... [-(



I think I'll stick to my LCD shutter glasses though :o
They are really the better solution... if you already have them! Else, they are too expensive.
And, with LCD shutter glass you can't see printed images!
I have a page explaining how you can easily take 3d snapshots with any commercial camera, even a 10$ one. Unfortunately, it is in Italian, and I never worried about translating it... :roll:
Stereovisore (http://www.geocities.com/lucassioli/3d.htm)
3d view explanation (http://www.geocities.com/lucassioli/stereovisore/costruz.html)

I'll try a short translation here:


You can have a 3d view when you look at something because you look at the same object using two eyes, each one with a different point of view. So, your brain recevies two slightly different images of the same object, compute them, and "gives you" a 3d representation of actual 2d images your eyes are viewing.
http://www.geocities.com/lucassioli/DADO.GIF

If you want to see a 3d photo of an object, you'll need two photos of it, taken from two different points of view: this is what Spirit and Opportunity are doing since several months: sending us couple of photos, which we use to build stereo pairs.

The interesting thing is that, as our eyes are 5-6 cm far one from the other, we can actually see in 3d only nearest object: actually we can't see 3d clouds or 3d mountains, because the difference in the two images seen by each eye are too little, as the subjects are far some kilometers, i.e. 100.000 times oour eyes distance!
But, if you take two snapshots of a mountain, one from a position, and the other from a position several meters far from the first one, when you'll look at the two photos with the stereoviewer you'll see, for the first time in your life (!), 3d mountains! :o
This is the method used by Mars Express to take 3d snapshots of Martian mountains, several hundred of kilometers far! Mars Express anaglyphs (http://www.marsunearthed.com/OMIndex/MarsMissionsIndex.htm).

With my stereoviewer you'll be able to see both Mars 3d images and 3d images taken by yourself.

Actually I don't know if this equipment already exists; I just invented it a couple of days ago, and it is an evolution of my first stereoviwer project (http://www.geocities.com/lucassioli/stereovisore/costruzione.html), born several years ago.

kucharek
2004-May-26, 07:16 AM
For Apollo, a stereo camera was designed, but never flown.
A mockup can be seen in te following Apollo 14 training photo:
http://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/a14/ap14-s70-46157.jpg
It was a project by Gene Shoemaker.

They figured out it's enough when the astronauts take a snap, make a sidestep and take another snap. Much easier proceudre, simpler equipment, less weight.
They took plenty of stereopairs, a few are in the ALSJ.

Harald

jumpjack
2004-May-26, 07:24 AM
For Apollo, a stereo camera was designed, but never flown.
A mockup can be seen in te following Apollo 14 training photo:
http://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/a14/ap14-s70-46157.jpg
It was a project by Gene Shoemaker.

They figured out it's enough when the astronauts take a snap, make a sidestep and take another snap.

This is the method I use to take my 3d snapshots. But with this method you can't take snapshots of moving objects. Fortunately (? :wink: ), there were no moving objects on the Moon.



Much easier proceudre, simpler equipment, less weight.
They took plenty of stereopairs, a few are in the ALSJ.

What is it?

kucharek
2004-May-26, 07:38 AM
Much easier proceudre, simpler equipment, less weight.
They took plenty of stereopairs, a few are in the ALSJ.

What is it?
Sorry, I sometimes take it for granted that everyone knows what it is. If you are at least slightly interested in the Apollo mission, but you are currently short of time, you should stay away from it. Highly addictive.
The Apollo Lunar Surface Journal (http://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/frame.html) is a commented record of all the lunar surface activities that happened during Apollo, with all the pictures, many in high-resolution.
Looking for stereopairs, I suggest to go to the image libraries and search for "stereo". There are also some red/blue stereo-images, mostly done by Jim Scotti.

Harald